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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A quick question. I'm looking to make some display safe/loading ammo out of vintage rounds.
I would like 5 rounds per caliber, in a correct charger/clip. Or say 8 for a 1886 Lebel.
So I figure I'll pull the bullet, dump the powder.....Then reset the bullet by hand? Glue it in? Don't want to drop it into an empty case if the neck of the old brass expands when I get the bullet. I would use a bullet puller hammer common with reloading gear that I have.
Now what do to with the primer. Just fire it/pop it using the action of the rifle? Or other methods?
I would say decap/deprime the ammo but its all Berdan primed.
Not really looking to make them "snap caps" that I can dry fire. Just original cases and bullets that look nice that I could load or display.
Take some of my early rifles, use round nose cupronickled bullets, that new spitzer FMJ just doesn't look right displayed with.
What have you guys done? Any suggestions appreciated.
 

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Pull the bullets as you described.
Dump the powder.
Pop the cap in your rifle.
Reseat the primer with a hammer if necessary.
Drill a couple of holes in the case, deburr if necessary.
Resize, with the decapping pin removed from your die.
Reseat the bullets.

The holes are to prevent anyone from mistaking the rounds as duds.
If the cases are steel you should probably paint or otherwise protect the bare steel in the drilled holes.

I have several calibers done up this way, including a belt for the 1919, makes a good display.
Also they work for function testing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks much Bob. That's what I'm looking for. I want a good display. But not really sitting live ammo with any of my collection. I have a handful at a time out of the vault in my "war room" in a case that can be handled and appreciated. Some period correct rounds make a good display with slings/bayonets/equipment.
 

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I've done the same as BobM1919, always drilling holes in the brass to ensure everyone knows they're dummies.As an alternative, if you don't want to drill the holes in the cases but want to ensure people know the rounds aren't live,, you can remove the fired primer, drill out the pocket and leave it empty( the best way) or fill will caulk,resin, I've even tried a dab of spray in insulation, which of course then has to be filed or sanded down to size. all of these options allow you to paint the filler material a nice bright red or orange.
 

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yeah, IMO you don't have to go through the trouble of drill a hole; take the bullet out, dump the powder, pop the primer then put the bullet back in. these are going to be for display, right?

which means you are going to mount them in some kind of frame and hang on the wall, therefore no one is going to be messing with them, including you. now if you were going to use them as dummy rounds, then I whole heartily agree to drill them in the side, to distinguish those from live rounds, and maybe even paint them a bright orange to further distinguish those from live rounds


I did kinda the same thing back a very long, long time ago to make a display of 20mm rounds. while I was at the range, I took fired shell casings then I pried off TP projectile from live ones......then when I got back I just epoxied the TP projectile into the expended shell casings.

 

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The way they do it for movies is to pull the projectile , dump powder, pop primer , de cap the primer, size it , insert a dummy primer ( it's just the outside cup part)
put some plastic BB's inside the empty shell casing then reseat the pullet and crimp.
But that's just how it's done out west.
the entire outside of finished round looks 100% for film use, plastic bb's make noise when shell is shaken so you can tell live from inert / dummy rounds.
GW
 

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I've done 8mm Mauser (.323), I will just barely neck size with a .303 British (.311 if I remember right) size resizing die....you can feel it just begin to crimp the brass down, with a boat tail bullet I can slide it right in over the tighter crimp and have nice dummy round....
 

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Some old cases are "loose fit" when you pull the bullets. I have used Lee factory crimp die to ensure a good bullet fit. But you need a die for each caliber...
I would say that would be the way to go if he was re-loading them..........but he is making display rounds, where they won't be "functional", a bit of epoxy is all that he would need to insure the bullets stay put in the cases
 

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You haven't seen all the things people can do with a full (dummies, of course) Maxim belt.:oops:
what does that have to do with the price of tea in china?

he said these would be for display, not to use them as dummy rounds. even if he used them as dummy rounds, if you put some epoxy around the inside of the neck of the casing then put the bullet in it, wait until it cures....it would be much, much stronger then crimping the bullet in there
 

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I built a bunch of fake .30-06 for my 1917 WC dummy gun years ago. I used old brass and bought cheap fmj bullets to reload, I took the fired LR primers, removed the anvils and used a punch to flatten them out and reseated them back in the cases. I never bothered to drill any holes in the brass as they stay in the belt in my rebuilt ammo box. The steel plate is a mounting plate that l made. Still working on the 1917 build. Too many irons in the fire. As an aside, did anyone else notice that in Saving Private Ryan when you see Corporal Epham carrying the machinegun ammo belts around his neck they have no primers in the cases?
3795277
 

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That sounds legit actually, I’ve never thought about it. To be honest, I am doing pretty well in ammunition and stuff like that when it comes to buy the right ones, but when it comes to give a proper answer to questions like that one above, I am more of a rookie one. Nevertheless, I don’t feel pressurized about it because I can always ask the right people about it and be sure that I get the most useful tip. Here bulkmunitions.com you will not only get the best ammo ever, by quality and quantity, but also you have a very good service and an amazing staff. I’m collaborating with this store for more than a year now and I am happy with every aspect of what they do and sell.
 

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I built a bunch of fake .30-06 for my 1917 WC dummy gun years ago. I used old brass and bought cheap fmj bullets to reload, I took the fired LR primers, removed the anvils and used a punch to flatten them out and reseated them back in the cases. I never bothered to drill any holes in the brass as they stay in the belt in my rebuilt ammo box. The steel plate is a mounting plate that l made. Still working on the 1917 build. Too many irons in the fire. As an aside, did anyone else notice that in Saving Private Ryan when you see Corporal Epham carrying the machinegun ammo belts around his neck they have no primers in the cases? View attachment 3795277
Actually, I did notice the primerless ammo in those belts.
 

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I just use a bullet puller hammer, dump the powder, pop the cap and re-seat the bullet. An impact bullet puller won't expand the neck. If you like, wipe a bit of epoxy inside the case neck before reseating the bullet.

Also, once you pop the cap, you can drill out the primer and fill with an epoxy. I've read some guys will put a pencil eraser in, to make snap-caps.

Blue is the standard color for training or inert ordnance. You could probably use a blue permanent Sharpie and paint the whole inert round so it would be readily recognizable as a dummy round.
 
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