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Discussion Starter #1
How many bringbacks ?





Topic author: Austin
Subject: How many bringbacks ?
Posted on: 06/01/2007 10:22:30 PM
Message:
Has anyone ever come up with a reasonable estimate of the number of various model Arisaka rifles brought back by GI's during and immediately after WW2 ?

What percentage were ground mums ? Maybe 75% sound about right ?

Also, approximately what percentage of bringbacks were "sporterized" ?

Just being curious.​

Replies:

Reply author: DRB
Replied on: 06/02/2007 12:13:14 AM
Message:
Afew year as ago a vet posted that his outfit was responisble for gving every returning GI from Japan a rifle. They handed them on eas they steppped on the ship it was easier then destroying them. He claimes his outfit alone handed out 1.25 million rifles. I would bet 99% of those were ground the other 1% were conventric circle or training rifles with no mum to beging with. IMHO Arisakas were brought back in huge numbers several million would make sense. I see them everywhere course 95% of them are cut down into deer rifles.

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/02/2007 12:41:24 AM
Message:
DRB:

Any authority to support your figures as they don't seem reasonable. "One outfit" handed out "1.25 million rifles"?! 95% were sporterized?! Sounds like bull crap, IMHO.

Reply author: 03man
Replied on: 06/02/2007 10:08:13 AM
Message:
This is one of those questions that while 'interesting' has no answer- only opinions.

There were 'a lot' of rifles, pistols, and other stuff brought back! Closer than that is only a guess, SWAG or otherwise. Many were sporterized or lost.

There was a thread a while back and I believe we almost agreed that based on observation maybe 75% of the rifles were ground(plus or minus 100% of course!).

Reply author: Bushido101
Replied on: 06/02/2007 10:53:33 AM
Message:
I have no idea how many rifles were brought back and couldn't even begin to guess. But from the number of rifles I have seen over the years, I would also guess 75% were ground. There are a lot of ground ones out there, more than mummed, also the number with miss-matched bolts would be interesting. I think it would be interesting to know the number of T99's vs. T38's brought back. I know around here you see fewer T38's Than T99's. Also the number of T44's brought back would be interesting to know. I know that from the Vet's that I have talked to a lot of them said they were handing them out like candy. My dad has told me that a lot of rifles and other things wer traded and swapped on the ship home.

Reply author: Todd A
Replied on: 06/02/2007 4:32:05 PM
Message:
For what its worth my Grandfather's last duty station was le Shima,US Army Air Corps ,301st fighter wing ,507th fighter group,463rd fighter squadron.

He tells tales of open wharehouses,full of equipment ...rifles,pistols,swords,field gear.....all free for the taking.Unfortunatly for me he did not partake. Can't blame him though he enlisted active duty prior to Pearl Harbor (National Guard before that) and by then he was just ready to come home.

Reply author: Josh man
Replied on: 06/02/2007 6:52:44 PM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by DRB

Afew year as ago a vet posted that his outfit was responisble for gving every returning GI from Japan a rifle. They handed them on eas they steppped on the ship it was easier then destroying them. He claimes his outfit alone handed out 1.25 million rifles. I would bet 99% of those were ground the other 1% were conventric circle or training rifles with no mum to beging with. IMHO Arisakas were brought back in huge numbers several million would make sense. I see them everywhere course 95% of them are cut down into deer rifles.


I doubt 95 percent of rifles were sporterized, I see alot of intact rifles around here(but alot of bubba jobs too). I would guess somewhere between 30-40 percent of rifles were altered in someway(using my percentages from the rifles I have seen around here).

I have heard of rifle that werent ground on the ships returning home, I actually have a rifle that was brought home from japan after the war, and the mum is completely intact. I am guessing that later on during the occupation, the mum grinding rule was relaxed or not inforced.

Reply author: rcb
Replied on: 06/02/2007 7:16:00 PM
Message:
According to Mr. Ed at the Shoot Out every man in his outfit from Buck Sargent down got a rifle and I suspect that was standard procedure all over. Garfield, Doss has ground hundreds and I have sporterized truck loads so DRB may be close to right.
rcb.

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/02/2007 7:48:31 PM
Message:
rcb:

Don't be giving away those close kept secrets.

Reply author: Ronin48
Replied on: 06/02/2007 9:36:58 PM
Message:
Just sold several hundred mums I've ground from rifles to Odie in AZ. He's going to "remum" rifles.

Reply author: 03man
Replied on: 06/02/2007 9:40:58 PM
Message:
Like I said,
no way to know.

Anyone reading this thread should know that most of the posts on this thread are done in jest.



Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/02/2007 10:03:48 PM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Ronin48

Just sold several hundred mums I've ground from rifles to Odie in AZ. He's going to "remum" rifles.


Do youu grind them for him so he has something to occupy his time?

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/02/2007 10:04:50 PM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by 03man
.

Anyone reading this thread should know that most of the posts on this thread are done in jest.




I am not smiling.

Reply author: jarjarbinks11
Replied on: 06/02/2007 10:12:51 PM
Message:
keep in mind that most every imported rifle brought into the country was mummed as well. they tend to lack import marks since they were brought in before the stamps were made a law. with that thrown into the mix, it would be very tough to determine if it came home via a vet or importer. so really, without a direct purchase from the vet or bring back papers with the serial number on it....it is impossible to prove it is a bring back. ground mum rifles on the other hand, were only brought home by vets. its pretty much safe to say that all ground rifles were bring backs.

Reply author: pacific-war44
Replied on: 06/03/2007 01:46:28 AM
Message:
As far as the import issue on Arisakas,I think there's more on-paper info for those.Back in the glory days of imports(late 50s-early 80s)most all gun mags ran full page adds for them,to generate interest in order to liquidate the crates and crates of surplus guns.All you have to do to research this is to flip through some vintage G&A,Field&Stream and Am.Rifleman,like I've done with a friend's extensive old mag collection.Of note,there were TONS of k98's,G-43s,a few '98 snipers and of course lugers and p-38s galore.As well as guns of all other WW1 & WW2 participants.Strangely absent were arisakas and nambus.I didn't find any advertised in the old mags from post war till around the late 70s,then a plethora of 38 long and carbines,along with t14s in ROUGH shape,usually with Chinese or Korean markings showed up.By then import markings were obligatory.I concur that the European guns were piled on our shores before the importers had to mark them,but from what I can gather out of the period adds,few Japanese guns were imported till we started getting trade friendly with the Chinese.If I can find a scanner I'll post some old Keng's ,Klein's(Oswald's favorite importers)and Numerich adds from 50 yrs ago to present.Those old mags are like research gold!

Reply author: Edokko
Replied on: 06/03/2007 02:27:55 AM
Message:
Scott, would love to see scans of those import sale ads from back in the old days !

Reply author: p3skyking
Replied on: 06/03/2007 02:30:11 AM
Message:
As far as importing Japanese weapons in the fifties, consider you are an importer.

Other than what the Rooshins and Chicoms captured, where were any in quanity? Korea was using them, so forget that. Any not tagged to be brought back by GI's were destroyed. Ammo was non-existant for them as it had been destroyed also. On top of that, they had been labled as junk since the war started. People wouldn't pay money for "junk". I can see why no importers brought any in.

Reply author: jarjarbinks11
Replied on: 06/03/2007 10:43:51 AM
Message:
then how do you account for all of the chinese refurb rifles out there without any import markings on them? everyone i have seen/owned had a mum on it. usually mixed numbered parts but always with a mum.

Reply author: Ronin48
Replied on: 06/03/2007 11:30:21 AM
Message:
This has developed into an interesting topic, many of the mid-1980s Chinese imports, mostly 38s with a sprinkling of 44s, a number of "Is'and a sprinkling of 30s and Chinese-made Warlord T-38 copies,that originally had mums retined them. Some were ground, even one of the Chinese copies of the T38, a "6,5, Infantry, Rifle" that I kept is ground. Don't think Dugout Doug sent word/troops to China to grind or have Japanese surrendered rifles ground, so my guess is a Japanese act on orders from the Japanese high command. Have two Chinese import 99s, NRA wretched, but both have mums. The James Angle collection has two 38s a long rifle and a crbine that were brought back at the end of occupation, both have untouched mums.
Suggests the grinding rule/requirement was relaxed after the Emperor renounced his divinety. However there is a report of a sailor whose ship stopped at Okinawa and while was ashore spotted a warehouse full of Japanee rifles. He asked the Marine guard if he could have one and was told yes, but you have to take the file by the door and remove the 'flower." When did Hirohito become a mere mortal?

I have a 10th series, full mum, "Chuck Klaeysen, Oct 14 to Jan 25, 1945,Wakayama Japan" stamped in the stock. Wakayama is a port city SE of Osaka. While a single unground rifle does not establish a trend, "perhaps" troops leaving for the U.S. from Wakayama (and other, smaller port cities?)were not required to remove mums on take-home rifles ?

And to answer Garfield, yes it's to give Odie something to do, take his mind off how old and decrepited he is

Reply author: pacific-war44
Replied on: 06/03/2007 12:43:12 PM
Message:
Don't forget the "forgotten war",Korea.Lots of Chinese refurbed guns('38s were well used and old by the late 30's)were picked up in N.Korea along side t-38 and 44 nagants.Some were left as intact as when the Japanese abandoned them in place,many were restocked or refinished with that "ak"shellac in the various Chinese arsenals,some that were under Japanese control a scant 6 yrs earlier.Some were bored out to 8mm,or maybe even rebarreled to 7.62x39,though that one may have been done later.My so-so scientific theories come from literally dozens of period adds from the era that depict boatloads of German,Italian and Frenchie guns,along with WW1 era enfields and Springfields,but just not a hint of Japanese goods till the late 70s.Of course I have no info if those were imp.marked or not,I believe they began to stipulate the marking thereof in the 70s or so. Doss usually refers to his travels to the B'ham gun shop ,ect. in which he obtained some early copies of Chinese released Japanese guns in the 80's I recall? Were they marked then Doss?

Reply author: mariko
Replied on: 06/03/2007 3:01:55 PM
Message:
Heres an ad from 1968,I have more if anyone interested...Mariko

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Reply author: mike radford
Replied on: 06/03/2007 3:41:48 PM
Message:
mariko, That is highly interesting. I wish I could order a 1903A4, an 03, an 03A3, a G-43 and an M-41 at the very least(or several of all). I wish a G-43 was cheaper than a FN-49 these days. Cool. Thanks.

Reply author: Edokko
Replied on: 06/03/2007 3:50:22 PM
Message:
Wow, cool ad ! Do you have any with Arisakas or Nambus ?

Reply author: arisakadogs
Replied on: 06/03/2007 4:24:45 PM
Message:
Ah, if only I could take a time machine back to my junior year in high school. It was then I found a T-2 Hamada with both matching mags & a pigskin holster for $500. I was working a McDonald's then for $1/hr - so...
While I'm at it, that same year I had a chance at a Ford 1928 Coupe in excellent running condition for $600!

Reply author: mariko
Replied on: 06/03/2007 4:26:12 PM
Message:
heres the only Arisaka ad I could find from 1960.The other one is 1965....Mariko

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Reply author: Edokko
Replied on: 06/03/2007 5:02:54 PM
Message:
That's cool, and I bet those 6.5mm rounds in 100 rd lot are military surplus too.

Reply author: mike radford
Replied on: 06/03/2007 5:08:31 PM
Message:
Thanks again, I want some 1911s and A1 this time. Walkie Talkie looks like one I had about this time and used channel 7 as well. I thought it was totally cool.

I am with A-dogs on money. I started at a Dairy Queen/Brazier in 69 at $1 per hour. Bought a 55 Chevy for $150 but had to spend about the same on repairing the PG trans.. Traded that for a 66 Chevelle SS 396/360HP for which I paid $999. Broke the transmission in a week or 2. As we know, even a $40 1911 was more than a week of work. Wonder I did not kill myself with the Chevelle and did come close a few times. It had some modifications and was fast. I had no fear but should have.

Reply author: CW
Replied on: 06/03/2007 5:47:21 PM
Message:
Great ads! My father has an old milsurp catalog. Next time I visit, I'll try and scan some pages.

Reply author: BIG ED
Replied on: 06/03/2007 5:49:23 PM
Message:
How about the dewat chau chau for 20 bucks .I bet the receiver was intact.

Reply author: Nagoya10
Replied on: 06/03/2007 6:30:03 PM
Message:
Those are great ads. But look at the conditions listed, NRA Good, Fair, etc. An NRA Fair from Century Arms was basically a rusted pipe. Good meant you could tell it was a gun, but well worn. Also, back in those days, many of those weapons were not actually in stock with those dealers. They would take orders (and the money) and sit on it for months until the rifles made it to our shores and through Customs. Mismatched was the norm on so many of these, except maybe the Swedish rifles. I would be willing to bet that the G-43's were East German surplus, the K98k's may have been French post war production or surplused ones from other European countries that used surrendered German weapons till they were worn out then sold them to these importers. The prices are real low by our standards, but these weapons did not always turn out to be what they were advertised as. I remember back in the 80's a whole bunch of Imperial German Gewehr 98's hit the market, recently imported. They were out of Turkey and were horrible. All were mismatched, but the importer, dealer or "arsenal" polished the numbers off the bolt root so they would not have to advertise them as mismatched. Stocks were everything from well worn originals to crude made Turkish replacements. Also back in the 80's, a number of T-14's were imported from Indonesia. I never saw one in person but they were described to me as worn, most likely mismatched also. And don't forget that guy (can't remember his name now) who imported a crap load of Mauser 96 Broomhandles out of China in about 84 or 85. Some of those were great but most were relic. He also got some T-14's in that batch and he sent me one, which would not even function and had mismatched parts. I sent it back. He later was prosecuted (I heard) for mail fraud or something related to his dealings.

Fortunately many Japanese weapons were brought back by US troops, apparently in larger numbers than German rifles, so we have a good source on the market for the time being.

Reply author: pacific-war44
Replied on: 06/04/2007 01:18:42 AM
Message:
I wonder where they got the "small lot" of t-30s? I told ya they were rare back then,imported that is,note the absence of 38s,99s and pistols.Mums unaltered it states,nice. This is indicative of the mags I was rummaging through,thanks for saving me the trouble,heh.Some adds have g43s w/scope for $15 more,hmmmm,is it worth it? DUH!

Reply author: mariko
Replied on: 06/04/2007 08:49:12 AM
Message:
Glad you liked the old ads,$15 might not seem much for a scope for the G43 but in 1964 I was making $2.97 an hour as a IWA electrician.I bought a Jungle carbine for $24.95 in 1962,that was a days wages back in the "good old days".If only we could go back in time with todays wages........Mariko

Reply author: DRB
Replied on: 06/05/2007 12:01:04 PM
Message:
The t-30 probably came from Finland via Great Britain and Russia. I have seen several with Finish markings on them as well as British, The Brits gave them to Russia when they no longer needed them and Finland was part of Russia in WWI. In the 60s the only real supply of Arisaka other then the lot sold to GB in WWI was in China which were were forbidden to trade with. BTW the G43s came from Czechoslovakia they used them for a number of years. Even a ugly G43 will bring a grand now.

Reply author: oldgoat46
Replied on: 06/05/2007 5:46:51 PM
Message:
Regarding bring backs. My Father in law was on a ship that sailed into Tokyo bay right after the war. He has an arisaka complete with mum and bayonet. He said that every man aboard his destroyer and every one aboard all the other ships were given souvenier Japanese weapons. Enlisted men received rifles and bayonets. Officers got nambus and swords. One Battleship would account for 4000 bringbacks. Oldgaot46

Reply author: Vicasoto
Replied on: 06/05/2007 9:02:31 PM
Message:
Hello Mike Radford:
Based upon the recent automobile auctions on TV you would have a 50,000 + Dollar item if you had kept that 66 Chevelle..... :))
Some interesting things I have seen :
1) a T-38 Nagoya 28th series in the 84000 range with a Lazy splayed "M" instead of a mum in mint
conditio, matching parts, with a brand on the right buttstock that reads in Kanji " Aba Shiri
Gun Jin Bun Kai " ( Abashiri Soldier Branch Association ). Yes the "M" was partially ground
off !!!.
2) a T-30 Rifle all matching except the bolt in nearly mint condition, the mum was overstamped
with three circles only.
3) a mint T-38 Nagoya 4th series carbine in the 30,000 range, mum, matching, original proofed
bright Chigusa rod with a stock repair of 3 butterflies at the pistol grip area. Yes this one
is a vet bring back with papers.
4) a T-99 20th series in the 29,000 range, ground mum, matching numbers, no rod, pod, wings, it
was purchased in the early 1960s from a surplus Levis and sporting goods store, the rifles
were in barrels your choice for either nine or nineteen ninety five each.
5) a T-2 mum, matching including the dust cover, but mismatch halves, with blood stains running
across the halves, a vet bring back from Leyte Island 1945.
6) T-99 sniper Nagoya 6468, mum, match, found on Kwajalien Island in Feb. 1944, brought home by
a sailor of the California Battleship. It was reunited last year with its matching scope.
7) Kokura 97 sniper rifle # 6931 mum, matching, picked up during the 1944 Saipan campaign by a
Marine rifleman of the 2nd Div.
8) T-99 25th series, mum, match, a bringback from Guam.
Now for some generalities among the Chinese surplus Arisakas of the late 1980s, they have import markings, some have mums, others have ground mums, while others have mums overstamped with circles which are reported in studies as surplused out exports of Japan such as to England & Russia. The Chinese did not bother to change the markings unless they were changed in caliber to 8 mm Mauser, even the ones made into "carbines" in 7.62X39 were not changed in markings. Typically the Chinese rifles have brands of the buttstocks, most are in poor to wretched condition, and beware I have ssen now two with torched holes in the barrel chamber below the wood line.
In my experience and based upon my purchases one in three came with a mum, some vet bring back condition 99s with all bells & whistles either had no bolt left or else the matching bolt was missing the guts. Among the snipers most rifles are matching, and over 60% are ground mums. Here recently a number of snipers are starting to come out of the woodwork with missing scope bases in either complete rifles, sporters, or jusy barreled actions.
We as a Japanese collecting community have enjoyed access to thousands of rifles brought home as souveniers, yes GIs did refinish many ugly rifles to make them more presentable, some were made into hunting rifles, our people were not choosy as the trainers, schoool rifles, 7/8s, double circles, old Muratas & shotguns, antiques, etc. will attest. Other than the Red Chinese junk and some rare importation of Finnish 30, 35, 38s our market place has not been flooded as the US, British, and German marketplaces have been with imports from all over the world.
In a way it has been good until the advent of the "world-wide web", yes folks the internet, it is a 2 sided coin of both good and bad. Prices have doubled and tripled on many of our favorite items, it is killing the gunshows. The real money makers are now sites like e-bay (e-pay, etc.)and the major auction houses. Where the money is where the sellers and rip off artists are now gone into with gusto, in ten years it will be as bad as collecting Mausers is today. Ahhhh such is progress.
Vicasoto

Reply author: Austin
Replied on: 06/05/2007 10:04:23 PM
Message:
Wow, 34 replies and not one attempt to answer to my quetsion !
Not a slam, I've really enjoyed the input, stories and nostalgia of the old magazine ads.
I suspect the number of bringback Arisakas can't even be guessed at.
Here's a guess anyway, 1,000,000. High, low, in the ballpark ?????
Discuss......

Reply author: jangle
Replied on: 06/05/2007 10:35:58 PM
Message:
The entrepreneurial, souvenir hunting GI's brought back their fair share of goodies, but don't think that every rifle hanging on the wall has a direct link to a GI obtaining it. I had talked many times with an old timer who used to attend the old Ohio Gun Shows in Columbus, Oh. Some of you may remember Zane Wilson. When he came home from the war, he opened a gun shop on North High St. in Columbus. It was called Zanes Gun Rack. He mentioned that in 1946 he bought several pallets (at least 100 rifles per pallet) of Japanese rifles. Some had Mums, most did not. He said either Bannermans or Interarmco had brought these into the country before the ink was dry on the surrender documents. I cannot verify this as fact, because I wasn't around then, but another old timer who wrote a book called International Armament told me the same thing.

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/06/2007 12:14:34 AM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Austin
I suspect the number of bringback Arisakas can't even be guessed at.
Here's a guess anyway, 1,000,000.


A guess based on pure speculation is as worthless as teats on a boar hog, IMHO.

Reply author: arisakadogs
Replied on: 06/06/2007 12:33:13 AM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Austin

Wow, 34 replies and not one attempt to answer to my quetsion !
Not a slam, I've really enjoyed the input, stories and nostalgia of the old magazine ads.
I suspect the number of bringback Arisakas can't even be guessed at.
Here's a guess anyway, 1,000,000. High, low, in the ballpark ?????
Discuss......

There is no answer to your questions that isn't speculation, so what's the point?
Still, brought out some interesting stuff.

Reply author: 03man
Replied on: 06/06/2007 08:50:46 AM
Message:
What part of 'has no answer' do you not understand? No one knows, period.

If you want a range; more than 1000(I have seen this many in one place) less than 6 million, the approximate total made from T30 through T99.

Reply author: Nagoya10
Replied on: 06/06/2007 1:44:30 PM
Message:
42.7% of all statistics are made up. :)

Reply author: szeigler
Replied on: 06/07/2007 11:07:37 PM
Message:
Austin,

Very interesting thread, and civil to boot.

I will answer your question. Going from memory, according to "The Reports of General MacAuthor", approximately 2.4 million rifles, carbines, and I think pistols were surrendered. Of that 1.2 mil were destroyed and 1.2 mil were brought home as sourvenirs. That that does not account for the weapons brought back before the surrender or by the Allies (I think), and is only an approximation, but it does give an idea. It also helps explain why many of us have at least 50 in our collection. I just moved, so once I get my gun books unpacked, I will scan the page and post it.

I trust that helps, Shannon

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/08/2007 02:29:56 AM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by szeigler

Austin,

I will answer your question.
I trust that helps, Shannon


Well, now we know. I feel a lot better. Thanks.

Reply author: Ronin48
Replied on: 06/08/2007 09:06:36 AM
Message:
Those "snappy" replies come from complications associated with the FBV76 syndrome, "Frustration of Being a Virgin at age 76." (not "virgo dummy!")((or was it " virgo Stupid?"))

Reply author: garfield
Replied on: 06/08/2007 1:25:25 PM
Message:
Rodent48: Who in the world are you talking about? Odie?

Reply author: szeigler
Replied on: 07/09/2007 12:07:41 AM
Message:
Austin,

A tad late on responding, and I understand this may have already been posted, but wanted to put it up regardless. Both pages are extracts for the Reports of General MacAuthor. That are (maybe were) available for sale through the Army's Center for Military History. Take a look at the second page, footnote #46. Could explain why so many came from "a Naval base in Japan".

Best Regards, Shannon

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Reply author: Josh man
Replied on: 07/09/2007 3:36:10 PM
Message:
Thanks for posting this, this is very interesting.

Reply author: DRB
Replied on: 07/09/2007 6:21:58 PM
Message:
That looks awful close to my first post where I said a witness to the event claimed his unit handed out 1.25 million rifles. I bet that is where the number in the report came from. Of course I am sure many rifles were not officailly recorded so I would be more then 1.25 million rifles came back. Still say 90% were sporterized. Here were I live, untill a few years ago, sporterized Arisakas were one of the more common guns seen at every gun show. Of course not on ly is this a rifle state it is on the way back from Japan. Now since Kerley will buy all the junkers you can find the sporterized Arisakas probably only rank 4th or 5th in commonality at the shows. Cheapest I ever got one was $4 for one. It was a working gun just cut down. Made good parts and that was only about 4 years ago.

Reply author: Josh man
Replied on: 07/09/2007 8:45:33 PM
Message:
Sadly alot of bubbaed arisakas show up here, some are even recent bubbas which kinda shocks me because they are knowingly ruining the value of a gun.

Reply author: CW
Replied on: 07/09/2007 8:54:50 PM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Josh man

Sadly alot of bubbaed arisakas show up here, some are even recent bubbas which kinda shocks me because they are knowingly ruining the value of a gun.


I don't find it too shocking. These rifles used to go for cheap and I see the same attitude today with some Mosin Nagant collectors. Heck, there is an article in the rescent issue of SGN on how to Bubba a Mosin.

Reply author: Ronin48
Replied on: 07/10/2007 11:34:34 AM
Message:
I saw the SGN article. Suppose if you collect Russians, you might want a sporter to shoot/hunt with. I can remember the days when a lot of scoped 99s and 38 were around, excellent workmanship, nice sporters. Haven't seen one in ??? What you see now are the dregs of the 50-60 "I've a hacksaw, you have that old Japanese rifle your Dad brought back from Iwo, lets make it look like a hunting rifle."

Reply author: Josh man
Replied on: 07/10/2007 7:06:00 PM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Ronin48

I saw the SGN article. Suppose if you collect Russians, you might want a sporter to shoot/hunt with. I can remember the days when a lot of scoped 99s and 38 were around, excellent workmanship, nice sporters. Haven't seen one in ??? What you see now are the dregs of the 50-60 "I've a hacksaw, you have that old Japanese rifle your Dad brought back from Iwo, lets make it look like a hunting rifle."


For some reason every Japanese gun I have seen tapped for a scope doesnt have a scope on it. I asked some guy who bent a bolt on a gun what was the point in doing it and he said it was to make it look nicer. Now I believe bubbaing wasnt because bubba needs a deer rifle, but because bubba can make a deer rifle. I have a friend who wanted a japanese rifle, and he found one in the bulliten boards, it had a new stock on it but thankfully the guy kept the old stock and all the parts.

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