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Gold Bullet member
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Something tells me we'll be watching this one relist over and over... and over.

I'd personally like to see the USDA brand burned into the side of the buttstock, like they do to a side of beef in the commercials.
 

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A certain sized piece must be cut from the stock and sent it. Yep, I said cut. The one that I have that is pictured on Dutchman's site that is mahogany is cut in the barrel channel. About a 1/2" wide, by 1.25" long.
 

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Moderator/Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet member
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The certification is worthless to anyone but the original owner . He knows what piece of wood he sent to the USDA . As far as anyone else is concerned , he sent in a piece of fire wood . There is no proof the piece of wood sent in , was from the rifle , even if you see a piece missing from the barrel channel or butt stock . I would throw that info out when considering buying the rifle . It is a RARE 1898 antique & we have seen these sell for $700 and up . So , what is it worth to you , regardless of the wood type ?
 

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I was given that rifle, so it didn't cost me anything. :thumbsup:
 

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Moderator/Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet member
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I was referring to the 1898 American walnut stocked rifle in the first post .

We know the Dutchman as a honest & reliable person . No doubt your rifle is mahogany !!!!!!!!!
 

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Brings up a good point... an 1898 in M38 configuration: does this appeal to the rest of you? It's neat, and I'd certainly love to have it, but just not at that price.

Still, if I could find an 1898, I'd prefer it to be in original M96 configuration. I can't explain why.
 

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USDA Wood Lab, says it takes about 6 weeks for a response, if you send address and contact. They identify to genus, if they can.

http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/centers/woodanatomy/wood_idfactsheet.php


Specimen size:
Specimens 1 X 3 X 6 inches are recommended for purposes of identification. If only small specimens can be supplied for examination, as is generally the case with antique furniture, we will try to provide an identification. We do not identify charcoal samples, nor samples from archaeological contexts except by prior arrangement.
Technique for removal of small samples from valuable wood products (e.g. antiques like m96s):
Small samples must be split from large items rather than shaved or gouged. To produce a good sample, use a sharp knife or small chisel and cut across the grain to a depth of about 3/16 inch. Make two such cuts at least 1/2 inch apart. If a knife is used, a splinter can be split out by prying up at one of the incised points. If a chisel is used, the edge can be placed in one of the cuts and then angled to travel down the grain to the other cut. A sharp tap will produce a good specimen. If the specimen cannot be rolled between thumb and forefinger without crumbling or breaking, do not submit it.
Still agonizing over where to cut such sample from mine.
 

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Yep, looks like American Walnut to me. Bit pricey! Looks to be sanded too, the magazine box looks to be a bit proud, slight rounding on some of the scraped edges.


--my guns don't complain about my wife's new purses--
 
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