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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tac,

Did I read that right, you've come across a K31 that has been chambered to 30 30 Winchester ? I have never heard of such a conversion and wonder where / when it was done.
 

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Tac,

Did I read that right, you've come across a K31 that has been chambered to 30 30 Winchester ? I have never heard of such a conversion and wonder where / when it was done.
Where there is a Swiss Buechsenmacher, there is a way. Conceivably, the chamber of a standard K31 barrel could be reamed out to accept an insert, and the bolt head would need to be enlarged, along with a modified extractor. Or maybe a spec built barrel? Magazine feeding is an entirely different proposition though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
These were sold sporterized in US 1950-60 gun magazines. Thought 1889 version, didnt think K31.
That got through my torpedo nets. As a kid, I thought I had every 1950 to 1969 gun advertisement of milsurp rifles memorized by heart. How in blazes did this happen.......... I am humbled to hear I missed this conversion...might have happened when I suddenly got real interested in girls.
 

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These were sold sporterized in US 1950-60 gun magazines. Thought 1889 version, didnt think K31.
This is true and accurate.
 
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It seemed VERY odd to me, TBH, but like a dwas, I was too busy to take a couple of photos. .30-30 is very uncommon over here - I've only ever seen another one. A lovely Savage Model 99, made in 1906, it belonged to a pal who gave up on loading for it after the correct bullets ran out. I twigged there was something odd when putting the bolt in - that hole at the breech looked a mite too small.

Needless to say, he took the gun back to the dealer the following day, not only because it was not what eh'd thought he'd bought, but because here in Merrie Olde UK he was breaking the law by having it in his possession. Notwithstanding that it had been sold to him as 7.5x55 rifle, it was, nevertheless, a calibre for which he did not have authorisation, and he was therefore 'acting criminally'.

I'd love to know what happened in the gun store the following day, with the dealer, who had sold it, trying to figure out how to explain away the serial number of a K31 going hand-in-hand with a calibre that did not match it, he having bought it as a 7.5x55.

The poor owner, having given it back to the dealer and hopefully had a full refund, would have to get a variation to his Firearms Certificate to enable him to acquire and possess a K31 that WAS in 7.5x55 - IOW, begin the whole process again. Explaining to the FEO would have been worth listening to, from both parties involved.
 

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About 25-30 years ago you had Swiss rifles but no ammo except from Norma and some small lots of Swiss ammo that made it here to the U.S. Norma was expensive then and even more so today. I well remember seeing Swiss rifles (1889 and possibly the K-11) being rechambered for the 30-30 cartridge and the K-11 for the 308 cartridge. Since obviously something had to be done with the conversions. A good gunsmith told me they had bushings that were setup and installed for each of the two cartridges, could be wrong but I believe they were pressed in place then chambered for 30-30 or 308.Then whatever alterations were dome to the bolt faces,extractors,ejectors and stuff like that..Funny I never saw one at any of the local rabges I useed to frequent. Frank
 

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Tac; re "dwas" : "Doctor Who Appreciation Society?" Not too many forum members are proficient in middle high Cornish.
Alas, none of those things. My Welsh grandfather, born in Caerestyn, near Wrexham, and for whom English was a second language, had a selection of regional expletives of a derogatory nature that were used to describe people with a less-than-towering intellect who did something clumsily. As my keyboard is Japanese, I have no facility to crown the letter 'a' with a circumflex accent - thusly - ^ - which would elongate the 'a' somewhat, making the word sound more like 'dwahs'.

This is the problem I have when writing to friends in Welsh - the word for water, dwr, and their address on Anglesey - Ynys Mon in Welsh - and many other words like 'lon' - lane - and so on, have to go hatless. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tac, we speak American, English would be a foreign language. I need a translator when I am in UK due to the fact Brits talk with marbles in their mouth and then use unknown words. Its that or they're all drunk.
 

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Tac, we speak American, English would be a foreign language. I need a translator when I am in UK due to the fact Brits talk with marbles in their mouth and then use unknown words. Its that or they're all drunk.
Reminds me: the US Army sent me back to Germany in 1977, after first sending me to the Defense Language Institute in beautiful Monterey, CA to learn German. I had an enjoyable time there, and did well in my studies, mainly because I had previously spent 4.5 years in Germany and had amassed a working vocabulary already. Monterey added mastery of the wonderful German grammar!

In Germany I was assigned to a Belgian Army kaserne with a US Army artillery detachment. We were close to a British garrison in Paderborn. Anyhow, these Belgians spoke Flemish, and I resolved to learn it so I could communicate with my Belgian counterparts. So I plopped myself down at the Belgian officers' club bar, learned to drink Trappist ale, and chatted with the barmen. I soon was able to understand the conversation at the daily staff meeting of the Belgians, and could express myself reasonably effectively. Being able to deal with the Belgians in their own language, or "tal" was a big advantage for both of us. Things were going swimmingly until a detachment of Dutch infantry arrived for a tour of security duty. Well, Dutch is about the same as Flemish, but they speak it 50% faster, and I was lost!

Anyhow, with some effort I was able to get along in Dutch and was a regular guest at their weekly Rijstaffel dinner. The Dutch soldiers in Germany received a bonus pay for "overseas service" and this unit spent the extra funds on their Rijstaffel feast. Good times!
 

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An Army mate, Londoner, and self called on my maternal uncle, broad Derbyshire/Moorland dialect and vocabulary. I stood slightly behind my uncle and nodded to Pete - yes or no, smile, nod head etc as needed.
He couldn't understand very much of what was said, but acquitted himself wello_O.
 

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An Army mate, Londoner, and self called on my maternal uncle, broad Derbyshire/Moorland dialect and vocabulary. I stood slightly behind my uncle and nodded to Pete - yes or no, smile, nod head etc as needed.
He couldn't understand very much of what was said, but acquitted himself wello_O.
Notwithstanding the assertion that accents and dialects are a thing of the past, I recently listened to a regional programme in which the narrator interviewed locals hereabouts, or, as it sounds in 'local' - 'lookles'. It was pretty funny to listen to one of the interviewees trying the interviewer in verbal knots with his Cambridgeshire/Suffolk accent - so thick you could sole your boots. 'Us'n doos allus tark like this'a'toom...' he avered seriously to the interviewer - ' we all talk like this at home'. Far from being an ancient ol'cudger, he was barely out of his teens - and a student of modern languages at Cambridge University.

We live at the top North-West corner of Cambridgeshire, and I know and mix with lookles on a daily basis, but going about ten miles into rural Cambridgeshire - the so-called Fenlands - and you could not only be in a different country, but a different century, too.
 

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Tac: maybe you have more info relating to this.
I don't remember where I read this, but during WWI Welsh soldiers were forbidden to speak their native language unless away on leave at home. This was until one British officer figured out that the Germans were listening in on their field telephones. The wires were not tapped; they didn't need to be physically connected to a clandestine monitor. Field phones used one wire between them, and the other terminal went to an earth ground, basically a rod pounded into the ground (or mud.) The Germans could pick up these telephone communication by sticking ground rods at intervals along the front and wiring them to their field telephones. So the enterprising British officers used native Welsh speakers to pass operational orders by telephone.
 
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