Gunboards Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
41 - 60 of 83 Posts

Registered
Joined
8,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #42
There鈥檒l always be the duct-tape option.
馃槵馃槣馃憤
I was waiting for someone to say that.

I could always fabricate a collar like some of those Ishapore GF rifles!
 
  • Like
Reactions: SDigger

Registered
Joined
11,683 Posts
There is also the option of threaded rods on either side of the hole. If need be.
I have a,ready PMd DD with another scenario.
Once the stock is loosens, removed from the rifle and the buttplate undone, should it be in two separate pieces (the crack shows on both sides) it would be easier and less noticeable to approach it as a total glue-up.
Dry fit the bits back together. Glue as any wood shop would and leave clamped for 48 hours. Making the effort to clean off any squeeze out naturally. Using the right adhesive the joint would be strong enough, maybe stronger than the wood itself.
No need for dowels or pins, or Heaven forbid screws.

I'm never been a fan of Gorilla Glue. It expands to fill voids which means it also wants to separate the joint. It brittles with age meaning it's prone to failure. Its a one way one time fix. Should it need attention down the road you're talking larger amounts of wood removal to get another repair attempt to even take hold.
I've used Gorilla Glue around the house. I tossed a few furniture items into the trash afterward. Cheap furniture justifiable as an experiment. Epic fail. It was impressive for the first few months to a year. Then total crap.
I learned not to trust Gorilla Tape as well. Grabs tight when fresh but doesn't stay fresh for long. Probably better to wrap the joint in rags and tie wire.

edit: I see Lyman and I are both on the same page at right around the same time
I've not had that experience either with old dry furniture fixes or a couple of stock repairs.
My biggest gripe is the "foaming", but once you know its coming, you're ready for it. Yes you do have to wrap, compress or secure it somehow, but that's just learning to work with the product.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SDigger

Registered
Joined
8,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
I got it disassembled today, the crack does not come out either end. But the screw is slightly bent. I'll get pics tomorrow.

 
  • Like
Reactions: SDigger

Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
52,423 Posts
It would hide the ring shank nail repairs from the 'Mountain Top Hadji Shop'.

Waiting for DDogs verdict. A hunch being just a hunch, I'm starting to guess transit damage.

he posted up some pics, may have been in another part of the forum you were invited too,,,,,, when he received it, that showed that it was likely transit damage, or the poor packaging made what was there a bit worse
 

Registered
Joined
8,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #49
he posted up some pics, may have been in another part of the forum you were invited too,,,,,, when he received it, that showed that it was likely transit damage, or the poor packaging made what was there a bit worse
That's about the gist of it. When there is enough free space for the rifle to move around and poke through the box, that says it was packed poorly from the get-go. It can't be ruled out as a possible contributing factor to the damage. Consider just the muzzle - poking through indicates the muzzle was not wrapped or protected, nor was the box reinforced at the muzzle end. IMO that's all the proof needed to place the burden on the seller.

Regardless of that, here we are.
 

Registered
Joined
442 Posts
Well, the K98k guys tell themselves that when the rifles were surrendered the bolts were separated , for safety, and when the GIs wanted to grab a souvenir they picked a rifle from one pile and a bolt from another. Still original... from the same pile that is....

Kinda hard to do that with a buttstock on an Enfield...


Hey guys, can't do that WHine and Cheese thing about a stock if you are good with mismatched # bolts.
 

Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
52,423 Posts
Well, the K98k guys tell themselves that when the rifles were surrendered the bolts were separated , for safety, and when the GIs wanted to grab a souvenir they picked a rifle from one pile and a bolt from another. Still original... from the same pile that is....

Kinda hard to do that with a buttstock on an Enfield...

slight difference,

98's and 1903's were made to have parts interchange,

as in bolt breaks, grab another, headspace, and move on,
no fiddling with the bolt head indexing etc etc, basically plug in play,

not the same on an Enfield
 

Registered
Joined
8,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #53
Hey guys, can't do that WHine and Cheese thing about a stock if you are good with mismatched # bolts.
Well it seems we can, since that's exactly what's happening! 馃ぃ馃槂馃槝
 

Registered
Joined
8,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #54

Registered
Joined
1,443 Posts
Ok I had a thought about another way to repair it.......How about boring out the bolt hole and gluing in a metal tube (or piece of pipe ? ) for strength and gluing and clamping the crack closed? it might be both strong and invisible...just a thought.....
 

Registered
Joined
5,786 Posts
Ok I had a thought about another way to repair it.......How about boring out the bolt hole and gluing in a metal tube (or piece of pipe ? ) for strength and gluing and clamping the crack closed? it might be both strong and invisible...just a thought.....
Are you forgetting about the shoulder inside the through hole? Then there's the little things like making sure the door functions and losing the stowage for the pullthrough weight. By that time the thought of slapping a buttstock on it doesn't sound so bad. it leans closer to being correct than the repairs to save a marking.

Your method is certainly a good way to repair old wooden lamps though :)
 
41 - 60 of 83 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top