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Discussion Starter #1
There's a lot of pictures.
I'll save the fun part for the end.

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That looks like a solid rifle
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
More......

As you can see, much of the bluing it now patina.

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Bolt does not match, but is also POF '60. The numbers are almost illegible, and I can only make out the last 2 digits, but they are not a match.

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Wish I knew what used to be painted here, green & white like the Pakistani flag.

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Buttstock says Pakistani P60, but I think it also says Savage (for some reason it won't let me type the "boxed S")

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Discussion Starter #5
Last one, full view in the sunlight:

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Scarce rifle. 👍
 

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is this another or the one you had with the cracked stock?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That looks like a solid rifle
And that is our problem right there.
I've been avoiding showing the damage, but you want to be shocked 😜

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Suffice to say, I was extremely disappointed to receive the rifle in this condition, as both the muzzle and rear sight had punched through the box as well.

However, as Richard notes, these are rather scarce rifles, so I did not refuse transfer & return it. Despite the fact the seller has no interest in replacing the buttstock, the one that's on it is interesting enough (and matching in character) that IMHO it is worth saving.

So...........

How do we do that?
I would like your guys ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice and spicy 😜👍😉
Did you color it over etc?
Like the darker look.
Cheer’s
Oh no, I haven't touched it. I think I'll disassemble it tomorrow.

is this another or the one you had with the cracked stock?
Same one, just posted pics of cracks, we just posted at the same time.
 
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Suffice to say, I was extremely disappointed to receive the rifle in this condition, as both the muzzle and rear sight had punched through the box as well.
It’s a shame about the damage. Careless sellers are infuriating. :mad:

Anyone who has ever purchased something from me can attest to the fact that that I go overboard to the extreme when it comes to wrapping and packing something for shipment. I’ll spend ten or fifteen minutes and use countless yards of packing tape to protect a ten or twenty dollar item that someone purchased. On the very, very rare occasion that I sold a rifle, my obsession with preventing damage in transit would cause me to spend 30 minutes or more to create a bomb proof package.

Sellers who drop a rifle in a flimsy cardboard box with a few handfuls of newspaper and a stingy few pieces of tape are guilty of wanton disregard and negligence. When such carelessness causes needless damage to good guns, they should be publicly named, shamed, and made subject to boycott by the collecting community.
 

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So...........

How do we do that?
I would like your guys ideas.
Did it fail in compression, where both sides of the stock mounting bolt well cracked lengthwise? Are the crack propagating all the way through to either the wrist socket, or the buttplate? Do you want to fix to make it shootable or fix for display only? For display only some carpenter's glue and clamp may do, but for shooting, you will need fasteners.
 

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Stock repair is, in essence, pretty simple. No I'm not being flippant.

1. Remove stock and all fittings (duuh, yeah, bear with me...)
2. Clean out mating surfaces with denatured alcohol to ensure no oil ingress.
3. Using carpenters cramps, close up split.
4. Mark out centre line of butt on nearest face to split.
5. Mark out points from before split and every 2" along centreline. These will be your dowel holes.
6. Release cramps.
7. Cover entire split surface with good quality PVA timber adhesive. The best type will be a waterproof PVA used for external timber. (Force in from side and carefully open up existing split just a little to allow full surface penetration, without increasing crack length.)
8. Cramp tight again, allowing excess PVA to seep out.
9. Drill vertical holes through from nearest (top?) surface of butt for length of repair rods - should be around 2.5"
10. Use epoxy glue around dowels and screw in fully to pass through split and anchor 1/2 length into sound timber below split.
11. Leave for several day until epoxy sets.
12. Remove cramps.
13. Cut protruding brass threaded rod off.
14. Scrape excess glue from split length using cabinet scraper or back of sharp chisel. Finish evenly to avoid local depression along split. Finish with fine sandpaper if required (260-320 grit at least)
15. Gently and carefully file and sand rod down flush with timber surface. Finish with fine paper, 320 grit in direction of grain only.
16. Refinish abraded timber with stain, if required.
17. Complete job by reoiling entire stock with Natural Linseed Oil.

Take time in getting it right. Do small bits and stop and think. You can't put timber back, but you can take a little more off next pass.

It's surprising what you can actually do. be confident, not overconfident, with yourself.

;) (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks.

I was skeptical about using threaded brass rod. I'll get her taken apart for further inspection & we'll go from there.
 

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Yes, that's a rare rifle, and a solid one at that.
 

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Could you buy another no4 stock and then put that on when you want to shoot it and keep the existing stock as is?
 

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Ahem,

Aren't we forgetting that this is two cracks, on both sides of a stock that has a center hole drilled through it, especially where the crack is on the side of the narrow point of the stock, in red below.

I don't think the centerline marks + dowels approach will work in that area. It would need to be done in two rows, on both sides of the mounting bolt hole.

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Stock repair is, in essence, pretty simple. No I'm not being flippant.

1. Remove stock and all fittings (duuh, yeah, bear with me...)
2. Clean out mating surfaces with denatured alcohol to ensure no oil ingress.
3. Using carpenters cramps, close up split.
4. Mark out centre line of butt on nearest face to split.
5. Mark out points from before split and every 2" along centreline. These will be your dowel holes.
6. Release cramps.
7. Cover entire split surface with good quality PVA timber adhesive. The best type will be a waterproof PVA used for external timber. (Force in from side and carefully open up existing split just a little to allow full surface penetration, without increasing crack length.)
8. Cramp tight again, allowing excess PVA to seep out.
9. Drill vertical holes through from nearest (top?) surface of butt for length of repair rods - should be around 2.5"
10. Use epoxy glue around dowels and screw in fully to pass through split and anchor 1/2 length into sound timber below split.
11. Leave for several day until epoxy sets.
12. Remove cramps.
13. Cut protruding brass threaded rod off.
14. Scrape excess glue from split length using cabinet scraper or back of sharp chisel. Finish evenly to avoid local depression along split. Finish with fine sandpaper if required (260-320 grit at least)
15. Gently and carefully file and sand rod down flush with timber surface. Finish with fine paper, 320 grit in direction of grain only.
16. Refinish abraded timber with stain, if required.
17. Complete job by reoiling entire stock with Natural Linseed Oil.

Take time in getting it right. Do small bits and stop and think. You can't put timber back, but you can take a little more off next pass.

It's surprising what you can actually do. be confident, not overconfident, with yourself.

;) (y)
 

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Ahem,

Aren't we forgetting that this is two cracks, on both sides of a stock that has a center hole drilled through it, especially where the crack is on the side of the narrow point of the stock, in red below.

I don't think the centerline marks + dowels approach will work in that area. It would need to be done in two rows, on both sides of the mounting bolt hole.

View attachment 3800445
There ya have it.
The cause of that crack needs to be addressed as well lest it happen again along another grain line.
When DDog gets it off the rifle we should know more.

Food for thought regarding a shooter stock: it doesn't always work as planned. Firstly the buttstocks should be properly fitted. They don't lend themselves to being changed often. Sure, one could swap them back and forth, but that could lead to cracking and chipping. The wood compresses when tightened. And again the next time and the next....

Keeping the original tucked away sounds good, but doesn't always work in reality. Very often parts get separated with the passage of time. Wood parts also go through changes while in storage.
While everyone intends to maintain absolute control over such things, only a few can actually keep things together.
Ive seen it go wrong more times than right.
 

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Something I've been experimenting with & having quite a lot of success is "Gorilla Glue".
2 caveats though.
De-grease inside the crack thoroughly.
Its water activated, so you need to get at the surfaces, which may involve opening it under control. then you dampen one surface & apply VERY sparingly & clamp together.
It takes long enough to cure that you have working time its not instant, which I like.
Downside: It expands & "foams" or "bubbles" as it cures, so you have to be there to remove the stuff that bubbles up before it gets hard.
Other than that I'm really liking the stuff, it even got a clear brownish color.
 

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Ahem,

Aren't we forgetting that this is two cracks, on both sides of a stock that has a center hole drilled through it, especially where the crack is on the side of the narrow point of the stock, in red below.

I don't think the centerline marks + dowels approach will work in that area. It would need to be done in two rows, on both sides of the mounting bolt hole.
Excellent, got you thinking about it. That was the purpose of the very crude approach.

It does require a little more thought in planning, procurement, setting out before action. Rather than allowing the arms to be thrown up in despair, I offered an approach. Glad you've identified a challenge to be solved.

You are, of course, quite right.

The centre line will allow for the known offset of the diameter of the stock bolt hole.

Now in reality, the stock bolt recess hole can be penetrated and obstructed by the pins to some extent. The stock bolt head does not need to be removed again (unless the stock is being completely replaced, when the effort of repair is then unnecessary. The clearance in the hole need only be for the width of a screwdriver sent down to turn the bolt.

I recall DDog looking for a replacement stock, so that would be the easiest and first choice. Repair of this one, the second.

In any case, the repair method above, with necessary modification to suit the actual damage, will still work. Its a common approach for armourers at Unit level for smaller stock damage. This isn't smaller stock damage, but then, DDog is not privvy to the expansive logistics chain of the said Army in 1961 either. ;)
 
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