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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This weekend at East Texas' nationally-famous Canton Trades Day I saw a seller who had 2 very similliar Gewehr 98's, and I bought one. ( I own 2 RC K98k's, but this is my first G98 and I don't know much about them. ) It has all correct German markings, and nothing else, though only the barrel/reciever match, like on RC K98k's. ( There are NO additional numbers or markings like the Russians normally use. ) They both looked as though they had been refinished at some point, but only the bayonet lug's "in the white" and still bright; the rest ( including the reciever and bolt body ) have been lightly blued. Markings on the reciever are, top: crown/Spandau/1916; left: eagle proof/3100/V and Gew.98. The sight has been changed post-war at Oberndorf, indicated by the "S/42G" below the new K98k-type sight.

The oddest feature is that the stock still has the ID disc in the butt ( no regimental markings on it, though ) and NOT the takedown "eye"; but also has the finger grooves. Is that common for a transitional model? Bolt, barrel length, and furniture remain unaltered from standard G98's; though a fixed sling ring has been installed in the lower swivel mount on the bottom of the butt. Stock markings are all weak, but there; save a strong "3" on the comb near the buttplate screw. There seems to be a newer 1/2" round mark ( circlet ) of some kind superimposed over a couple of the 3 cartouches on the right flat of the butt, but any letters in it are so faint as to be illegible. The only real difference I noticed between the 2 of these he had was that the other, dated 1918, had both the finger grooves and takedown eye of later models; I went for the earlier date.

Both G98's this man had supposedly belonged to his father-in-law, who was said to have purchased them in the 60's or early 70's. Neither have import markings anywhere. ( And I forget when that became mandatory; anyone remember? ) According to Wikipedia, large numbers of these were imported from Spain around then. I suppose my main question is whether or not the condition I've described is consistant with the possibility that this is one of them. I'm mainly curious as when and why the parts were mixed - did the Spanish do that to their service rifles; or is another source more likely? Would Mauserwerke-Oberndorf have done anything like that when they changed sights?

ANY ideas and/or information would be most welcome! I have also posted this request over on the surplusrifle forum; but so far, no responses. I hope someone here knows more!
 

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James,

From your description, it sounds like you have a Gewehr that survived the war (WWI) and was refurbished in Germany during the 20's/30's. From what I've seen, the rear sight is the major modification on these along with some blueing to parts that were previously in the white.

The German stocks did have some modifications in 1916. The Stock disc was removed and the inlets were introduced. Some stocks "straddle" the changes and have both characteristics. The other 1918 Gewehr you saw had the correct type stock with the bolt take down disc. That rifle was very likely "turked" as well. Many 1918 Gewehrs (esp. DWM made) were lent to Turkey late in the war.

I don't know much about a Spanish connection. Your description doesn't seem to indicate anything that would point to time in Spain.

IIRC, import stamps were not required prior to 1968. So this could have been brought in prior to that time or even a bring back from WWII.

Post some pics - that will definitely help us "ID" the rifle.

T
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, Alamo!

That gives me some ideas; unfortunately, I have NO digital camera with which to post pictures, or I would've done so. As I said, this has apparantly no surcharge stamps like I've seen on Turkish or other foriegn-use post-WWI G98's. My main question is when and where it would've most likely been rebuilt from parts a'la the current abundant crop of RC K98k's? I didn't know if the Germans would've done anything like that when changing out the sights; or if the Spanish - if it WAS in Spain - would've bothered once their Civil War was over.
 

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No telling from where the rifle came if pre-1968, but Spain is a good bet from what you describe.. without images things can only be guessed at, but good signs of Spanish background is "painted black over metal", or "MP8 in bomb" marking in the stock, usually they are sanded and quite light in color.. usually total m/m, and a little rough but not as bad as Turks. Also they come in funky alterations, Mannlicher in appearance, shorties (cutdowns) poorly done, but often they are fairly normal.

As to the S42G rearsight, that was not done by Mauser, only the part was made by them. We have had this discussion before and there is no evidence or even reason to believe Mauser had anything to do with this process (actually it makes no sense that they would do such low profitability work)

As to rifles that are most prevalent seen Turked, that is not DWM, but rather their poor sister company Mauser who had a long relationship pre-war with the Turks. Starting in 1916 you see increasingly fewer and fewer Mauser products that are "German" utilized.
1916 its starts where about half & half are Turks and by 1917 its 90%, and 1918 near 100%, though you do see Weimar jobs of 1918 Mauser vintage occasionally.

Oh, mismatched is not German ordnance sop, field levels and depots you find a few small m/m parts, but primary parts would have been re-numbered (at least abbreviated).

Re Spain during the war, and post war, they did contemplated entry and sought German assistance (which Hitler vacillated over but every time arms and aid was discussed it changed his little mind), Spain was dramatically unprepared for war- completely- and small arms was just one of their short comings, post war they were the blacksheep of Europe for a time, over their poor behavior during the war and unlike Turkey who was quite practical this time around and got aid postwar (their Army was on a war footing long after the war ended, one of the last, and got US military arms..) Spain probably had to make due with what little they scrounged from the Germans (which in the scheme of things isn't much..) I am sure they salvaged parts & salvaged the junk too!

Anyway, Spain had a rough time of it right alter the war, and though they wrangled aid during the war from the "United Nations" (for behaving) the US especially was anti-Spain as the war progressed (The Brits always with an eye to the future more "understanding"..)
 

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Thanks for the extra info Paul. I knew someone with some real knowledge would chime in! ;)

I have a real passion for imperial arms, especially Russian and German rifles of WWI, I just don't have the funds to own as many as I'd like!

T
 

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Same here.. I study them more than collect these days... your comments were quite good really.


Thanks for the extra info Paul. I knew someone with some real knowledge would chime in! ;)

I have a real passion for imperial arms, especially Russian and German rifles of WWI, I just don't have the funds to own as many as I'd like!

T
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Now knowing what to look for, I'm pretty sure the faint circular mark in the stock is in fact the flaming bomb; it's stamped atop 2 of the German cartuoches, which themselves are illegible. ( What I'm pretty sure is a beechwood stock has apparantly been lightly sanded making the cartouches mostly dark blurs. ) I can definitely see the "M" in it, though that's the only one that really shows. There's NO black paint, fortunately, only a fairly thin and sloppy bluing job over the parts originally "in the white". With no import date, I feel confident it's one of the pre-1968 Spanish imports Wikipedia referred to. At least all the parts are German, and ( save for the loop added to the lower sling swivel ) conforms in appearance to the Weimar-modified G98's; which this was presumeably built from. It looks good on the wall along with the 2 RC K98k's; I'm looking forward to seeing how it performs compared to them, too.

Thanks again for the useful information!
 
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