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The one on the toggle train is an eagle proof, a military proof marking. The finish looks like a WW1 era DWM pistol but you didn't disclose that info. the barrel is the same thing only very faint. Not sure if this was a light strike from the factory or a refinish from long ago (possibly at at arsenal, but we cant know without more info about the pistol itself).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The one on the toggle train is an eagle proof, a military proof marking. The finish looks like a WW1 era DWM pistol but you didn't disclose that info. the barrel is the same thing only very faint. Not sure if this was a light strike from the factory or a refinish from long ago (possibly at at arsenal, but we cant know without more info about the pistol itself).
First off, thank you very much for the info. Secondly, I honestly don’t know much about Lugers, nor this one. That’s why I posted those pics. Again, I appreciate the info you have given.

I will take more pictures of the pistol when I can.
 

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First off, thank you very much for the info. Secondly, I honestly don’t know much about Lugers, nor this one. That’s why I posted those pics. Again, I appreciate the info you have given.

I will take more pictures of the pistol when I can.
The barrel eagle marking is an imperial era proof test acceptance stamp. The toggle marking is basically the same marking although I don't know the specific acceptance meaning. There will probably be another eagle mark on the right side of the receiver at the rightmost position if this luger has a WW1 date on the chamber. The luger was police issued and maintained as indicated by the extra safeties on sideplate and behind trigger (trigger safety long gone--sideplate sear safety remains, both on left side). This luger was manufactured for the military then put to police use in the 1920s or 1930s. This is common.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The barrel eagle marking is an imperial era proof test acceptance stamp. The toggle marking is basically the same marking although I don't know the specific acceptance meaning. There will probably be another eagle mark on the right side of the receiver at the rightmost position if this luger has a WW1 date on the chamber. The luger was police issued and maintained as indicated by the extra safeties on sideplate and behind trigger (trigger safety long gone--sideplate sear safety remains, both on left side). This luger was manufactured for the military then put to police use in the 1920s or 1930s. This is common.
Sadly there is no date and no other markings on the pistol. But thank you for the info!
 

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The sear safety pretty much identifies it as a police issue piece from most likely the 1930's . Is there what might remain a small stamped piece of what remains of a mag. safety under the left grip panel? It appears to me there is a corner of the left panel missing where a piece of the mag. safety could have been. I have a 1917 DWM luger that was a police issue with these features. It must have been issued in 1937 due to the date stamped on a police type holster that contains the same stamped number on the back as the serial number of the pistol. You have a very nice piece there.
 

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The mag safeties were removed by policy and there are very few that remain uncut. This luger shows the modified grip that accommodated the mag safety. Under the grip you should see a round hole where the mag safety was installed.
 

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openfields ---- My police issue luger has the sear safety in tact and a stamped piece containing the round hole you mentioned. The hole is not in the pistol's frame but in the stamped piece. The stamped piece extends from the mag release button rearward and upward into the frame of the pistol where a "U" in the stamped piece has one leg of the U running forward. The extreme end of that leg contains a small tab in the forward end that is fitted into the pistol's left frame flat. Would this stamped piece normally have been removed when the mag. safety was dismantled?
 

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openfields ---- My police issue luger has the sear safety in tact and a stamped piece containing the round hole you mentioned. The hole is not in the pistol's frame but in the stamped piece. The stamped piece extends from the mag release button rearward and upward into the frame of the pistol where a "U" in the stamped piece has one leg of the U running forward. The extreme end of that leg contains a small tab in the forward end that is fitted into the pistol's left frame flat. Would this stamped piece normally have been removed when the mag. safety was dismantled?
I have viewed a luger that had the mag safety (removed when I saw the lugers) and there was a round hole in the left frame to accept the mag safety. It is possible there is more than one type of mag safety and I saw only one type of accepting hole. Your mag safety seems not to require the frame hole or, because the mag safety was long gone, perhaps the hole I saw had nothing to do with the mag safety. I am speculating because I have never examined an intact mag safety. Most mag safeties were removed by policy and, yes, I have seen both cut safeties and totally removed safeties. In both cases, there was evidence of removal of wood in the left grip to accommodate the mag safety, as in your luger. The cut safeties seem to be a stamped piece bent to functional shape, as you describe, but the protruding end that goes behind the trigger has been cut off.
I have never personally examined an intact mag safety.
 

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I dont' see the round hole I expected so the hole I saw on another police luger was either for some other purpose or your (former) mag safety was of different structure. I apologize for my imprecision and uncertainty but I have never examined an intact mag safety, only the traces of former mag safeties. These were removed long ago by German policy. The sear safeties remained.
Regardless, the photos depict a police luger with intact sear safety and a left grip that was cut to accommodate a magazine safety.
 

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I dont' see the round hole I expected so the hole I saw on another police luger was either for some other purpose or your (former) mag safety was of different structure. I apologize for my imprecision and uncertainty but I have never examined an intact mag safety, only the traces of former mag safeties. These were removed long ago by German policy. The sear safeties remained.
Regardless, the photos depict a police luger with intact sear safety and a left grip that was cut to accommodate a magazine safety.
You can see a repair that was done to the left frame--I recall someone stating this was done after the mag safety was removed to fill the empty slot but that was long ago and more recent scholarship may exist that is more informative and accurate.
 

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Someone just linked a photo of an intact mag safety. thanks to the luger photo angels for sending this photo. It shows exactly what I recall. There is a pivot hole behind the trigger in the left frame under the sideplate where the mag safety pivoted to block trigger depress. Your mag safety was removed, as you can now see, and the pivot hole is under your sideplate.
 

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Attached below are some photos of my luger with what remains of the mag. safety. I'll have to apologize for the quality of the photos due to their blurry condition. I hope you are able to see the part enough to recognize what remains of the part in question. Sorry again for the poor photo quality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Attached below are some photos of my luger with what remains of the mag. safety. I'll have to apologize for the quality of the photos due to their blurry condition. I hope you are able to see the part enough to recognize what remains of the part in question. Sorry again for the poor photo quality.
Thanks for the pics, interesting. What exactly does that do as a function on the Luger? Is that a police Luger? If so, how rare are they to find with that still attached to the pistol.
 

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Raizer125 ---- I've never seen a luger with the magazine safety complete. As I understand there was at least one additional piece to what is shown in my photos. That piece had an arm which pivoted in the small hole shown. When the magazine was removed the arm moved downward to block the trigger from being pulled. That is only my best estimate of how the contraption worked. Apparently the mag safety wasn't very reliable and was a source of problems. I believe that mag safety was only installed on police lugers and must have been dismantled by them. The luger shown is dated 1917 and initially was military issue in WWI. It must have been adapted into police service during the 1930's since the police style holster with a loading assist tool containing the pistol's serial number is dated 1937. Finding a pistol with mag safety intact would be very difficult, maybe only in a museum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Raizer125 ---- I've never seen a luger with the magazine safety complete. As I understand there was at least one additional piece to what is shown in my photos. That piece had an arm which pivoted in the small hole shown. When the magazine was removed the arm moved downward to block the trigger from being pulled. That is only my best estimate of how the contraption worked. Apparently the mag safety wasn't very reliable and was a source of problems. I believe that mag safety was only installed on police lugers and must have been dismantled by them. The luger shown is dated 1917 and initially was military issue in WWI. It must have been adapted into police service during the 1930's since the police style holster with a loading assist tool containing the pistol's serial number is dated 1937. Finding a pistol with mag safety intact would be very difficult, maybe only in a museum.
Interesting stuff. Thanks for the info. I’ve always wanted a Luger and I just got into them recently for collecting and researching. So I appreciate what you guys have written here, I’ll dive deeper now that I have something to look into to. Thanks again.
 
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