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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I am hoping that those of you in the know can tell me a bit about my Smith-Corona 03-A3 (pics viewable at below links).
On the top of the barrel, next to the breech: stamped “Smith-Corona MODEL03-A3” ser# 3682790
On the top of the barrel, next to and under the front sight: “SC” sticking out from under the front sight is a “3” (guessing there is more under it).
On the bottom of the barrel, near muzzle: “P”
On bolt release: “ON” on the outside and “OFF” on the inside
On the rear facing edge of the flip safety: “BUEMLER” or “BUEHLER”
I see no other markings other than the front sight is a LYMAN and the rear is a flip-down with no name. The butt pad is a Pachmayr Gun Works brand. I can't find any brand markings or otherwise on the Montecarlo stock.
I love this rifle, it was given to me by a relative who was a veteran of several theaters and a lover of anything that went bang. I am embarrassed to admit that I know nothing of Smith-Corona though and any information you can provide about the markings and where/when it was made would be greatly appreciated. I could never sell it but I would be interested in knowing the value if anyone has any idea. I’m guessing it was either sporterized after production or SC had a sport line.
Thanks all.
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A301.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A32.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A33.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A304.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A305.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A306.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A307.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A308.jpghttp://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A3.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A309.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A310.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A311.jpghttp://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/shakes1976/03-A309.jpg
Be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi all, found the below reference on another thread so it looks like maybe it was produced 5/43.

"Smith-Corona Serialization Date ChartLast Update - 03/20/2005Smith-Corona M1903A3==================Month-end Serial Numbers (Compiled by William Hansen - Used with Permission)1942 Dec 36137111943 Jan 3623568 Feb 3633908 Mar 3647887 Apr 3665790 May 3684449 Jun 3701851 Jul 3707999 C3711999 4718902 Aug 4742368 Sep 4765852 Oct 4789047 Nov 4809923 Dec 48261601944 Jan 4840077 Feb 4845831Approximately 28,000 additional serialized receivers were produced but not made into rifles by S-C."
 

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You have a sporterized M1903A3. I also have sporterized Smith Corona that was given to me by my grandfather (a WWII Vet) I was his deer rifle and when he got too old to hunt, he gave it to me. Now it's my deer rifle. I own 90 guns, and to me, my grandfather's SC is my most valuable piece. But, that's sentimental value, not monetary value.

To be completely honest with you, you'd be hard pressed to get much more than $250 for it. In the 1950 and 60s sporterizing military rifles was the poor mans way to get a sporting rifle without paying top dollar for it. One could buy a military surplus rifle for $20, put $80 worth of work into it and for a $100 investment have a rifle that could compete with any $200+ Remington or Winchester in terms of accuracy. But, "Bubba" ruined the value of sporterized military rifles. Bubba is a term for the DIY gunsmiths who butchered their rifles. Since there is no way to tell how competent the person who sporterized the rifle was, Bubba has created a feeling of suspicion towards sporterized military rifles. Since the supply of cheap milsurp rifles has dried up, military surplus rifles in original, unaltered condition are worth hundreds of dollars. So people who don't have sentimental values prefer to buy commercial hunting rifles nowadays.

Now, more about your rifle... The safety on your rifles was replace by a "scope safety" The original safety flipped over 180 degrees from "SAFE" to "Fire," but the eye piece of a scope would get in the way, so a modified safety that only moved 45 degees was developed. You can buy one today for between $10 and $20 dollars. The barrel of you rifle was shorted by cutting off the last 1 1/2" that included the original front sight. A replacement front sight was solder onto the barrel. Also the rear sight was originally on the rear of the reciever. It mounted on the dovetail where the rear scope mount is now. Someone also added a sporter rear sight onto your barrel. This was most likely added as a backup incase the scope fogged up. Someone drilled and tapped the barrel and screwed the rear sight to it. Under the front sight on the barrel is the manufacturer, month and year the barrel was produced. Most likely, if you removed front sight, you'd find the markings SC over a Flaming Bomb over 5-43. Due to production schedules the month on the barrel may vary by +/- 1 month. I have a 2 Smith Coronas both serial numbers fall near the end of April '43. The serial numbers are 407 apart. The lower numbered one has a SC 5-43 barrel, the higher numbered one has a SC 3-43 barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you MP517PRCT for all the info, it's really nice to know a bit more about it. The rifle has far too much sentimental value to sell so it's not discouraging to find that its monitary value is low. The relative that passed it on to me fought in WWII as well, unfortunately he had a stroke history and was unable to give me much for details about it.
Thanks again!
 
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