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"assault musket"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently bought this interesting little Belgian or French 7mm(?) pin fire revolver. I've done marginal research on it, and it appears these little guys where made in large numbers thought Europe from the 1860s to the 1890s. Other than that don't know much.

The markings I can find on this gun are an "ELG" in an oval with a star, does that mean Liege? where it was made maybe? Also a "T" on the lower barrel with a little Germanic style cross over top of it. There's a 5 on the hammer, and a "VM" or "WA" I found on the inside of the frame after removing the grips.

I also wonted to note that it seems unusually ornately scrolled and detailed. I've been looking over pictures of similar ones, and most are very plain. Significant?

Last thing I wonted to ask, HOW ON EARTH DO I FIX THE MESSED UP DOULBE ACTION? I simply can't figure it out! Almost no one does videos or tutorials on how to fix these things it seems, and I'm just stuck. The issue is, when pulling the trigger, the hammer will pull back, but then the hammer is just just floppy. If you manually bring the trigger forward, the hammer moves down. Any answers Thanks...

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Can not help with the origin of your revolver, not in my wheel house by any stretch.

As far as the mechanical issue though, the mainspring is clearly disconnected from the mechanism.
It is resting on the frame, just behind the hammer.
Now, as to how it is supposed to be connected to the hammer depends on the design.
Some designs just rest the end of the spring on the bottom of the hammer, others have a "knob" that fits in a detent on the hammer and some have a pivoting link that hooks to the hammer.
I am unfamiliar with this specific model/design so you will have to examine it to determine how the spring attaches to the hammer.
Videos on line may help you there.
In any case, for it to function, that spring must be connected to the mechanism.
Once that issue is repaired, you can move on to other potential problems the pistol may have.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, I'm not as worried about the origin as getting it fixed. Ask for the spring, it appears to have a little curved hook on the right side of the spring like you where saying, below the hammer there's a small pivoting piece of metal with a little bar on the end. My theory is that the end of the spring and its hook are worn out and its just slipped off? Anyway, your info has go be farther than I was before...(y)
 

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Here is a start for your restoration - the French call this the triple action 1862 Lefaucheux type, the video is for a 12mm, but the action of your 7mm is the same.

Impossible Restoration of the Broken Revolver - YouTube

and another:

RESTAURATION D'UN REVOLVER LEFAUCHEUX ANNÉES 1860 - YouTube

You will likely need the help of a welder to repair/build up some worn parts, but outside of a few cheap needle files, and good small vice, and patience, you will be able to fix it.

Ammo more repair info here:

Reloading kit for 7, 9, 11mm pinfire cartridges - revive your vintage Lefaucheux revolvers - - H.L. Publishing (hlebooks.com)
 

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OK, the video link that MG08 provided for the 12mm version shows the end of the mainspring as split with a hook on either side.
This is generally what you see on these old revolvers.
If yours only has a hook on one side then it is possible that your mainspring has broken and lost a hook.
Look for evidence of fractured metal and cracking on the side that doesn't have a hook.
In that case I have no suggestions, except to try and find a replacement.
I don't know if a repair is possible without ruining the temper of the spring.
Perhaps there is someone out there that can still make a flat spring with the dimensions you need but I don't have a clue as to where to look for such.
As I understand it, such work is more of an art form rather than a job so, to me, it is no surprise that gun makers switched to coil springs.
Some one else may see it differently and, hopefully, they will chime in.
Let the hunt begin.........
 

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ELG is the Belgian Proof House at Liege...obligatory on all guns Produced and Sold in Belgium.
Does not necessarily indicate maker.
Doc AV
DocAV is right of course!

"ELG" stood (and stands) for: Epreuvé LiéGe. Meaning the gun was proofed at the proofbank in the Belgian city of Liége.
Sometimes (I don't know how often) the real producer's initials can be found on the gun.
Let's not forget that, in those days, a lot of elements of such guns were made "at home".by several individuals.
 
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