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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys , I have a couple of interesting flea market finds. I was wondering if you guys can help me ID these and maybe give me a value on them also.


The can is marked 8 cartridge 60 mm HE m888 w/fuze pd m935 for m224 mortar LOT ma-94d049-004.

Each tube looks to be made of cardboard with metal ends and read
tube cap and bottom reads FF 60 MM mortar 16 01 omg cont pa 73


This ammo can is marked on the lid . 20mm mk3 Mod1 Nord 7586 ,, WM 1945 Insp FN OR 329498 - 1 , The insp numbers are hard to read so i may have one or two of the numbers wrong

This is some kind of aircraft fire extenguisher , It was inside the navy can and i bought them together =) It is marked on the very bottom , not show in the picture.
KIDDE container Aircraft fire extinguisher , Bromochloromethane , Specification MIL-C-6386 ,, MFRs part no 870271 . It also has Overhauled 9-60 on it. It is still full and showing green on the gauge. Any ideas about this one?

 

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The mortar can looks new,Vietnam or later.
20 mm ammo can,WWII dated
The aircraft extinguisher is full of Halon, this may be of interest to a restorer or museum, they cannot get these refilled any more. I have several old Halon extinguishers that I am keeping, they will beat any other extinguisher hands down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Storkman , Any idea of the value of the extinguisher? It has the $436 showing on it but no idea if that price was realistic. the gauge does have a little piece of the glass over it missing but it still reads bottom of the green and you can feel the fluid move inside as you move the container around =)
 

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The fire bottle has no value other than a curiosity. They have life limits AND Halon is no longer used in aircraft................................... After a closer inspection I believe it to be an "Engine fire bottle. There are usually two per engine, electrically activated and can be a number of different extinguishents. I cannot tell from the pictures, are there electrical contacts? Has the unit been discharged?

ps Halon is not allowed in the cabin or cockpit areas anymore
 

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That could be the positive terminal and its probably grounded to the airframe. They are electricaly detonated, probably a 24 volt system. The pressure discharge varies between 750 psi to 1500 psi depending on the bottle. I'd treat it like a UXB!
 

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That could be the positive terminal and its probably grounded to the airframe. They are electricaly detonated, probably a 24 volt system. The pressure discharge varies between 750 psi to 1500 psi depending on the bottle. I'd treat it like a UXB!
Sorry, no offense but working pressures of most engine fire bottles is 650-800 psi.
Halon is indeed the current medium of choice for engine fire bottles. However this bottle has the old chloromethane in it, hence the liquid "sloshing around" that jboy reports.
You are correct that this is an electrically discharged system usually of 24 volts DC.
The "squib" which is in fact the little silver apparatus on top of the bottle is indeed the electrically activated cartridge that "fires" a small piston into the discharge disc internal to the bottle.
Said discs upon fracture release the agent out of the ports into the discharge lines plumbed to the engines.

jboy74,
What you need to do asap;
Mondragon has this most entirely right, voltage apllied to the squib can potentially "fire" the bottle, rapidly discharging the gas. In this case the bottle, normally held down with those three double lugs to the airframe will undoubtle become a rapidly spinning/carrening projectile, certainly highly dangerous and toxic, (chloromethane displaces oxygen).

While safe to handle (this thing has been laying around for 50 years) I would immediately remove it to an outside locked area.
Do not let any electricity come into contact with the squib.
I would then box it up in a sturdy wood (not cardboard) box and inform your local fire department/haz-mat team what you have and can they kindly come get it.

A safetying technique used on current installations (the squibs are life limited and require changing every 5 years) is to connect a wire between the locknout terminal and the squib base, however I`m not advocating you do this. Just treat it like a mildly potential explosive and get it away from immediate contact, contact the local authoritys and let them handle it.

I hope you didn`t pay too much for it my friend because I doubt you`re getting this back.........
FYI, I`m an aircraft mechanic, I change these things (bottles/squibs) out all the time, it`s a shame I`ll never see this one, it`s older than me!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Would the extinguisher be worth anything once discharged =) I have friends that are fire fighters and first responders, I can call them up to see how and if they will discharge it without destroying the container =)
 
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