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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to trade some militaria I've accumulated over the past year this weekend and need help with three items. One is some type of communist pin commemorating 45 years between 1943 and 1988. The Japanese Peso bill, I was told, is currency used during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. I don't know if the coin is a peso too, but its old and has Asian characters. What's the worth of these three items?


 

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The silver coin is a Chinese one. The original value (the side without the head) says "One Yuan" also called "One Dollar" in those days. The upper character is a special cipher "1" the character below is "Yuan". There are many fakes, I don't have the impression that this is a fake but the photo is to bad to be certain. The head is of a famous Chinese General (I have one somewhere but the name escapes me (Shih Kai?)), it must be of the interbellum.
Sorry to be off topic but these coins exist with one more (or is it less?) character around the head of the General. Both varieties have different values.
And now you may laugh and not believe: there is a way to know if the coin is false or correct. I have seen it done many times in China by vendors and buyers. You take the coin (not to firmly) between thumb and index, the edge facing you. You blow as hard as you can on the edge, your mouth being practically against the coin. After that you immediately take the coin to your hear (without changing your hold) and listen. If the coin "sings" faintly it is not a fake. This is no joke I assure you. I wouldn't sell it, but that's probably nostalgia!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
It sings

Neat trick! - sure enough the coin rings after blowing on it's edge.



The coin and the ten peso note were included with a T99 Arisaka rifle I bought from a vet. He got the loot from another vet.
Edit: found this info online:

"The Yuan Shih Kai dollar, known as the Yuan's Head, was circulated in China during the early year of the Republic.

Yuan Shih-Kai was an influential figure in China at the turn of the century. After the Wuchang Uprising broke out in Hupei in October 1911, the Ching court reluctantly selected Yuan as the prime minister. Later, Yuan forced the Ching emperor to abdicate the throne and forced Dr. Sun Yat-Sen to surrender the position of the provisional President to him. At the end of 1915, Yuan declared that the monarchy would be restored next year. Due to the strong opposition across the country, Yuan had to declare in March 1916 that he abandoned the title of Emperor and that his presidency would be maintained. He died of anxiety and fear in May of that year.

Yuan Shih-Kai exerted tremendous influence not only on the political development of modern China but also on the country's economic and financial development. One example is the currency during the early years of the Republic.

The new coin was cast following the adoption of certain regulations. After the design was approved by the President, they were struck at all major mints across the country. The weight and purity of the new coins were uniform, 7.2 mace and 90% (later 89%), respectively. These coins were struck in 1914, 1919, 1920, and 1921.

This coin, commonly known as Yuan's Head became popular across the country because of its uniformity, new design, and standardized purity. The issue of Yuan's Head met the need for a unified state currency in the industrial and business development during the early years of the Republic. This was further ensured by the executive order of the government. The Yuan's Head gradually replaced the Dragon Dollar and foreign silver coins in China."
 
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