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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I went back to the Udvar-Hazy Center today (the museum that's absolutely free for only $15) for the first time in about four years. I was wondering if any progress had been made on displaying the world's only remaining He-219. When I was there in '06, The restored fuselage was to be seen, with a note that they were working on the wings & engines. Today, the fuselage, engines & nacelles are there. Remarkably little else has changed. They have an F-14 now, that I don't think was there before. They traded off the Swoose to the AF Museum, and are supposed to get Shoo Shoo Baby in return when Swoose is on display. It's always seemed there should be a B-17 at the Air & Space Museum somewhere.
 

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Come on, it's completely free. All you have to do is walk a mile from the nearest public parking lot, over an overpass without pedestrian sidewalks and you're there! I was there a month ago and I thought the old engine display was fascinating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was there a month ago and I thought the old engine display was fascinating.
It is, absolutely. Unfortunately, the aircraft machine gun exhibit is about half the size it was when the museum first opened. For Ricky & anyone else who would like to go, this museum has some great exhibits, if not not the best lighting in the world. What David & I are referring to with the money is the fact that, although admission is free, parking is $15. The museum is located in an area that is essentially only accessible by automobile. There are shuttle buses from the downtown DC Air & Space Museum, if you are visiting there, or from the terminal at Dulles, if you have a layover. I don't mind paying for museums to help them operate, I'm just not fond of those sorts of games.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Went back today, almost a year & a half later to see if anything has changed with the Uhu. Nothing has changed.


They have, however, opened the restoration hangar, phase II of the museum complex. Some old friends from the Garber Facility at Silver Hill showed up there:

Sikorsky JRS-1 Amphibian, which was on Ford Island during the Pearl Harbor attack and survived to perform patrol work around Hawaii for the early part of the war.


Nakajima Kikka, the Japanese take on the Me-262.


Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver.

According to the website, these a/c were moved there in March. it doesn't appear anything has been done to them since. I think they have opened the new facility, but have yet to move any of the actual restoration work there from Garber.

The new walkway to the resto. center gives a new angle on the space hall.

Also, someone recently asked on another thread what happened to the Smithsonian's Me-163? Here it is today:

Not sure if the Connie was there before or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Uhu update, two more years later. One last visit before we move out of the area.
Saw the He-219, and not that much was different, except the ailerons are there.


But what's this? In the far corner of the restoration hangar, what's that I spy under the plastic? The wings have arrived.



The Pearl Harbor survivor, the Sikorsky amphibian, has been reassembled.



The Kikka is somewhat reassembled, and the SB2C seems to be well underway.



I don't think the Hun was there before, and the H-34 is just for Clyde.



And the Enterprise has been replaced by the Discovery.

 

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Uhu update, two more years later. One last visit before we move out of the area.
Saw the He-219, and not that much was different, except the ailerons are there.
View attachment 691392 View attachment 691393

But what's this? In the far corner of the restoration hangar, what's that I spy under the plastic? The wings have arrived.

View attachment 691395 View attachment 691396

The Pearl Harbor survivor, the Sikorsky amphibian, has been reassembled.

View attachment 691397

The Kikka is somewhat reassembled, and the SB2C seems to be well underway.

View attachment 691398 View attachment 691399

I don't think the Hun was there before, and the H-34 is just for Clyde.

View attachment 691400 View attachment 691401

And the Enterprise has been replaced by the Discovery.

View attachment 691402 View attachment 691403 View attachment 691404
I have little love for the CH-34, even in Marine guise. One curst near killed me (in France - perhaps it resented having to go there). They are also noisy and vibrate a lot. not pleasant aircraft to ride in.

Captain Eric "Winkle" Brown, RN mentioned that the Uhu seemed underpowered and sluggish to him when he did evaluation flying on them (among other things) after the War.
 

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I spent some time arguing with the curator about the aircraft gun display. It seems he thought the fact that the hotchkiss portative being labled as a british MkII browning wasn't a problem. Half the guns they had on display weren't what the data cards said they were. I'm sure at one time they had the proper guns and cards together but not when I was there last. I thought museums were supposed to do things right because people use them for research and as a basis for standards of ID of whatever they display. Apparently the curator thought museums were just places to work til they got another job higher up the list and the displays were a necessary evil til they retired on the govt dole.....

On the other hand, lots of good work is done by these museums and the volunteers who actually do a good part of the work. Without them we'd never see any work done and the 219 would still be in a pile somewhere. Glad to see things are moving even if its at a glacial rate.

Frank
 

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I was there MANY years ago while I was in the Boy Scouts. The museum hadn't been built yet. It was the weekend that the government had shut down to balance the budget. We were supposed to go to the Air and Space Museum, but it was closed. On our way back home we drove by Dulles and someone mentioned we ought to stop in and see if airport management would give us a tour of the airport. This being the early 90's, they did so without hesitation. We eventually made it to the Air Traffic Control Tower and were given a look see. While there, a buddy asked about a airplane parked at the other end of the runway. I heard a man state that it was a Lockheed Constellation. I almost broke my neck spinning around to see. I grabbed a pair of glasses and gave it a look for myself. There were a couple hangars and outside were the Connie and a C-130. The man told us that the Herc was the last one to fly out of Vietnam. He offered to take us to the hangars and we jumped at the chance. The first hangar was a Quonset Hut type and surrounded with chain link and razor wire. The man proudly told us that if it has been five years earlier, we'd be shot for being that close to the hangar. When the doors opened and the lights powered up. I found out why. There sat the SR-71 that now sits in the museum. In all its glory and still leaking fuel. You guys can probably imagine how a young aviation buff like myself felt getting to meet one of his heroes. He took us to the next hangar and opened the doors and there in the middle sat Enterprise. It was surrounded by "smaller" aircraft such as a F-4 Phantom, a G model B-17, an H model B-25, a B-57, some missiles, an Apollo capsule they used for testing, and an old Ford Trimotor. I took pictures of all of this, but have lost them in the passing years, but a memory still burned into my memory.

Fast forward almost 20 years to this past June, and I accompanied my mother and stepfather to Reno to attend the Habu reunion. There I met many of the flight crew and ground crew for the A12 and SR71 and U2 programs. These are some of the greatest and most humble men I have ever had the privilege to meet. I went clay shooting with a few ground chiefs and had dinner with several pilots. One of the pilots I met was the Ed Yeilding the pilot of SR-71A #61-17972. I talked him up a bit, got his autograph, and told him the story I just told you guys. I hope he enjoyed it half as much as I did. Of course, these guys NOT being fighter pilots, were rather interested in my own military history, so I got to go on and on about submarines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In the far corner of the restoration hanger, those are Horten 229 wings my friend.
Ah, yes, The wings that sort of go with the V3. I was trying to make sense out of something that didn't make sense, as the wings looked unfamiliar. I did recall, though, that the Uhu had had a spurious paint scheme applied, and those crosses are certainly not in the right place for most Luftwaffe paint jobs. You have good eyes, and maybe spent some time with the 'Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe' game that was popular back when? That seems to have made the Horten a star. I take it then that the He-219 wings are still being worked at Silver Hill.
 

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A few years back the military channel or something did a show on the Horton. Lockheed ended up building a replica of the Horton with original materials to test the actual radar cross section with the radars used at the end of the second world war. Turned out it had a pretty low profile and could have possibly defeated the radars of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, then, if you haven't been there, here's the Ho III f
 

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