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Hello everyone,

I am trying to find out when these guns were first made, specifically whether they were used in WWI or not. Also, is there a way of establishing a precise date of manufacture based on the serial number of one of these guns? Finally, are there any good sources of information about the history of these guns?

I've tried multiple Google searches but they only returned a limited amount of information, much of which was contradictory in nature!

In case it helps, the particular gun that I'm interested in was made for use by the British military (it has the broad arrow acceptance mark) and has a serial number in the 3000s.

Hope you can help.
 

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WWII H&R flare guns with broad arrow are seen from time to time. Most are as new and came out of Canada (through not C broad arrowed). There is not much published about these because no one cares. It is a fertile field to research.
 

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British Order

For what it's worth these Mark V1 broad arrow marked H&R signal pistols are part of an order for 15,000 pistols, placed by the British Purchasing Commission on 25th September 1941. H&R are not referred too, only that the order was 'placed in U.S'.

Strangely the designation on the contract ledger is given as No1 Mk1V, even though this had already been given to the I.L. Berridge alloy pistol. I don't think the H&R pistol ever recieved an official designation in List of Changes.

Most of the examples I have seen have been in good condition. I have yet to see an example with the Bitish military crossed pennants proof mark, or an FTR'ed marked example. I suspect these H&R pistols were disposed of after the war. Quite a few turned up New Zealand when I was living there.

Regards

AlanD
Sydney
 

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According to "Flare Guns & Signal Pistols" by Robert M. Gaynor Jr., the MkV H&R pistol came out in 1941, as a replacement for the Remington MkIII used in WWI. He gives no date for the MkVI, but it had to come after the MkV. Primary WWI US signal pistols were the MKIII, and various French issue, and copies thereof. Of course, troops operating in the British sectors, would use British designs.
 
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