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Discussion Starter #1
My Hall is ready to shoot. I would post pics if I knew how, but mine looks just like all the rest anyhow. The cast parts I received from The Rifle Shoppe were not bad and now the rifle is only missing the sling bands, and probably will be missing them forever. My replacement parts were the trigger guard, front and rear sights, breach latch and nipple. The rear sight was cast to small and did not snuggly fit in its place, in fact it was so small it just fell out during the test fitting, even before I began to clean up the casting. All the other castings were acceptable enough. I was able to use the replacement cast sight as a pattern and I made my own out of steel which came out perfect. My question today is, what size percussion cap do I order? The replacement nipple was an exact match to the original. Thank You
 

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Ditto the musket caps. To post photos click the picture icon at the bottom of the comment box; it is the one between the chain links and the camera shaped button. That will open a box that allows for drag and drop photo attachment or you can click on the new box and attach a photo from your files.
 

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G, thank you for the info. Do you own a Hall conversion? Since I am only months into my steep learning curve about this antique rifle, or any percussion devise, I need advise. I need a cap #. My neighbor has a repro Hawkens 50 cal and his primer cap is smaller than what I need. So when I order, wouldn't musket cap be rather generic? I have seen nipples for sale and one must order by size. My nipple OD at the very top = .225. At todays times, looking for and securing black power items seems to be difficult, but not impossible, therefore I do not want to order incorrectly. Thankxxx
 

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G, thank you for the info. Do you own a Hall conversion? Since I am only months into my steep learning curve about this antique rifle, or any percussion devise, I need advise. I need a cap #. My neighbor has a repro Hawkens 50 cal and his primer cap is smaller than what I need. So when I order, wouldn't musket cap be rather generic? I have seen nipples for sale and one must order by size. My nipple OD at the very top = .225. At todays times, looking for and securing black power items seems to be difficult, but not impossible, therefore I do not want to order incorrectly. Thankxxx
Presently I have 5 Confederate percussion converted Halls. I've owned a number of others at different times.

Prehaps musket sized caps have a number, but I've never hear of them described that way. They are literally sold a "musket caps". Something like this will work perfectly: IA0604 CCI U.S. MUSKET CAPS (100)

I own one rifle that has a smaller than musket sized cone on it at the moment, and have had a couple of others that way too, but the overwhelming majority of percussion conversions, including all Federal conversions, take the musket sized cap. If you like I can measure the diameter's of some of the cones on my examples.

G
 

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G, Thanks for your time and now I have solid information I am confident of. My rifle is a Federal conversion if I am to believe what I have read, which is the Confederates ground down the breach flat while the Feds left a chunk of metal in front of the hammer. If I had an extra $900 I'd buy The Rifle Shoppes replacement repro complete flinter breach, they are so cool looking but impractical at this moment. Thankx again, now I know!!!
 

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G, Thanks for your time and now I have solid information I am confident of. My rifle is a Federal conversion if I am to believe what I have read, which is the Confederates ground down the breach flat while the Feds left a chunk of metal in front of the hammer. If I had an extra $900 I'd buy The Rifle Shoppes replacement repro complete flinter breach, they are so cool looking but impractical at this moment. Thankx again, now I know!!!
No problem.

There are actually a number of different Confederate alteration styles. Some do have the breech block ground flat, on others it is untouched, and on others they sort of did a half way job. The easiest way to see if you have a Confederate conversion is to make sure it isn't Federal. Federal conversions are very consistent and always have the frizzen toe filled in and the top of the block milled flat except for a lip at the rear of the block under the hammer. The right side of the block will retain the pan's overhang as well. The percussion cone is installed at roughly a 70 degree angle, and a new made percussion hammer with a distinct spur on the back of it about half way down rounds out the conversion.


Here are a few of mine, though I no loner own the one on the right end. Left to right they are a Jackson (Mississippi) State Arsenal conversion, a Holly Springs (Mississippi) Arsenal conversion, a South Carolina alteration, a Charleston (South Carolina) Arsenal conversion, and an exceptionally crude unidentified alteration.
3800835
 

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Discussion Starter #8
According to your description mine is the Federal. Your collection is stunning, everything looks original! With repro replacement parts completing my rifle I'll call it a shooter, and its probably not worth much. It has the patina and look of your rifle, 2nd in on the right but has the Federal breech conversion. If my phone would cooperate I'd send a pic to my computer and I would post it, but I am struggling here.
 

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It is interesting that the Confederates did not fill in the breech. Mine was so expertly filled in you would never know that there ever was a hole there, the flint hardware was also cleanly removed. I wonder how many of these rifles are still around?
 

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Thank you, I've spent quite a while assembling it. Not shown in the photo is a M.D. Holloway North Carolina alteration.

It is interesting that the Confederates did not fill in the breech. Mine was so expertly filled in you would never know that there ever was a hole there, the flint hardware was also cleanly removed. I wonder how many of these rifles are still around?
Some Confederate alterations also filled the frizzen toe. The Holly Springs alterations are quite well done with a filled toe and a breech block that was neatly milled on both the side and top. Some South Carolina alterations also fill the toe, but usually the whole of the pan is retained, so the fill isn't quite flat across the top.

Counting the antebellum issues of Hall's Rifles to Southern States and the ones in storage at Federal Arsenals in the South that were seized in 1861 there would have been between 6,000 and 7,000 Model 1819 Hall's Rifles in Confederate hands. Usually a 10% survival rate is considered pretty high for Confederate arms.
 

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How are you able to identify the arsenal that did the conversion? Mine shows no trace of the flintlock pan so based on what's posted here it seems to be a Confederate conversion. Would be interesting to find out where it was converted.
Hope the OP had fun shooting his Hall.
 

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How are you able to identify the arsenal that did the conversion? Mine shows no trace of the flintlock pan so based on what's posted here it seems to be a Confederate conversion. Would be interesting to find out where it was converted.
Hope the OP had fun shooting his Hall.

A number of alteration types were identified by Dr. John Murphy and Howard Madaus in their book Confederate Rifles and Muskets. The book is turning 25 years old this year, so some more information has surfaced since publication that clarifies some of the information they speculated on.

If you post some photos here, or in another thread, or just pm them to me I'd be happy to take a look.
 

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This is a Federal altered Hall rifle for reference. It might be a little hard to discern, but in addition to the pan fence under the hammer, there is also an overhang on the right hand side of the block.

3801538
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is a Federal altered Hall rifle for reference. It might be a little hard to discern, but in addition to the pan fence under the hammer, there is also an overhang on the right hand side of the block.

View attachment 3801538
G. Yup, that is exactly what my rifle looks like. On my rifle the front of the breech rests a few thousands below level with my barrel/receiver, should this be a problem or should I shim it up a tad to level it up? My next hurtle will be purchasing some FF powder, so far I can't find any in stock anyplace. I am hoping to find one vendor who has caps and powder so the Hazmat shipping charge will cover both items. The percussion caps at Dixie were only $12, and in stock, but the Hazmant shipping fee was $30! I might have missed it but I could not find powder at Dixie. Monday I'll get online, look around some more and make some calls to see what I can find. I called a few shops near where I live in New York State and I was almost laughed at when I inquired about powder, then I gave up. Thank you for your knowledge and your willingness to pass it on.
 

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If you can't find black powder you could shoot it with Pyrodex or another brand of black powder substitute. They work just fine in percussion firearms. Much easier to find than black powder. No matter you still need to clean right after shooting as the residue is also very corrosive.
 

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To clean my Hall after it is shot what is the procedure? Since there is blow-by between the breech and receiver I assume the breech must be removed and everything in sight must be cleaned with hot soapy water every time the rifle has been shot. So, should the interior of the stock get a scrub down where the breech sits, and then hot soapy water will get all over the stock? After cleaning what type of oil should be used down the bore or is there some other product more suited for the job? I assume any kind of oil will do on the exterior of the rifle when wiping it down. So little knowledge and so many questions, thanks, I don't want ignorance to destroy this rifle. I have caps and .526 round balls on the way, my brother in-law has an extra can of FF for me.
 

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To clean mine after shooting I remove the breech block so I can clean it thoroughly and get clear access to the breech. I run the block under hot water and use a toothbrush to clean the chamber. To clean the barrel I use a washing machine hose - the kind with two female ends - and I cut off one end and tapered it so I can shove it into the breech. Then I connect the other to the faucet on my slop sink and run warm water though the barrel. By doing it this way I don't need to take the barreled action out of the stock and I don't get water all over the place. After giving the bore a good rinse I clean the barrel like I would any other black powder gun. Run patches down until dry, then swab with Hoppes then dry again and oil it. I just use household 3:1 oil. With the action removed I wipe clean and oil all metal I can reach on the receiver then put the block back in.
 

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To clean mine after shooting I remove the breech block so I can clean it thoroughly and get clear access to the breech. I run the block under hot water and use a toothbrush to clean the chamber. To clean the barrel I use a washing machine hose - the kind with two female ends - and I cut off one end and tapered it so I can shove it into the breech. Then I connect the other to the faucet on my slop sink and run warm water though the barrel. By doing it this way I don't need to take the barreled action out of the stock and I don't get water all over the place. After giving the bore a good rinse I clean the barrel like I would any other black powder gun. Run patches down until dry, then swab with Hoppes then dry again and oil it. I just use household 3:1 oil. With the action removed I wipe clean and oil all metal I can reach on the receiver then put the block back in.
Steve and Greylock, I now know enough to proceed forward with confidence garnered from all the responses to my questions. Steve, your washing machine hose rinsing method solves my biggest mystery , how to clean the barrel without getting water all over the stock. When spring has sprung in upstate NY I am going to get outside to take a trip back in time and and put some life back into this rifle, with half loads of 50 grains. I simply can't wait! Thankx again!!!
 
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