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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The rockets were all hand made, and they had a lot of trouble drilling the nozzles. That doesn't help consistency. Modern production methods would likely turn out better rockets, but I doubt that will happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Highrider,
It was a package deal, but the rockets made it more agreeable. It's only the third Gyrojet that I've seen in the flesh.
 

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Oh, you've got to shoot one! Very few have ever had the experience.
Use a big target.
 
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Talked to a couple SF guys who were with SOG.
At one time they even had a few of these that made it into their inventory in RVN.
Some were test fired. None were ever taken to the field, though.
I believe there may have been an issue with bits coming back at the shooter.
Accuracy was an issue as well.
 

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The Gyrojet had two disadvantages. Like any bullet it is likely that the rocket will tip or oscillate slightly in flight. But under Newton's first law it will continue in a straight line unless it is acted upon by an external force. A rocket will which doesn't have fins etc. will go on travelling in the direction where that oscillation made it point.

At a moderately long range the projectile had extremely high energy for a pistol round, imposed with very little recoil. As it's hard to make a soft-pointed rocket, it may not be used to the best advantage. But it has plenty.

That velocity and energy, however, are produced by acceleration beyond the muzzle. At extremely close ranges, such as often happen in real-life pistol confrontations, it would have relatively little.

Then there is the humanitarian aspect, if the rocket hits even a dangerous miscreant withthe fuel still burning. I should think burning was extremely brief, and it might have been no worse in practical terms than being shot in the normal way. But remember the furore about Eagle Claw bullets, with a jacket scored in such a way as to extend itself in little claws? I can imagine some pretty lurid interpretations of what police departments were ding to people, or what opposing forces were using in war.
 

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Thank You for sharing
I have only seen one of these, in person, in over 45 years.

An interesting concept that was probably ahead of its time.
Current manufacturing technology could probably improve the idea but I still don't see any real drive or need for the investment.
 

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Talked to a couple SF guys who were with SOG.
At one time they even had a few of these that made it into their inventory in RVN.
Some were test fired. None were ever taken to the field, though.
I believe there may have been an issue with bits coming back at the shooter.
Accuracy was an issue as well.
I would add that in 1965 as I was buying my Gyrojet at the factory, I witnessed staff unpacking what was clearly U.S. military shipping container, with TWO Gyrojets that had just returned from VietNam. And yep, they did not accept my offer to purchase one!
 

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I would add that in 1965 as I was buying my Gyrojet at the factory, I witnessed staff unpacking what was clearly U.S. military shipping container, with TWO Gyrojets that had just returned from VietNam. And yep, they did not accept my offer to purchase one!
Wow, it's interesting that you saw those two pistols "in situ".
This is one of them, then and now :)
It's a Model 137, modified with a 13mm barrel sleeve and loading gate.
It was used extensively as a test mule at the time, including a stint at the HP White Laboratory for rocket testing and development, before shipping to the ARPA Research and Development Field Unit, Saigon in Spring of 1965.



Brown Air gun Wood Trigger Wood stain


Air gun Wood Trigger Gun barrel Everyday carry
 

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somewhere around here I have a Gyrojet key chain,

leather fob with a dummy rocket hanging from it ,

picked up a big estate 5 yrs or so ago, Gent's grandfather was a higher up in that company

he had 3 or 4 pistols, I bought all but one,
and he kept the ammo, (he had several boxes)

I was amazed at how light they were,
and how the hammer works backwards, as in you pull the trigger and the hammer knocks the rocket/bullet back into the firing pin, and is reset by the rocket
 

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Back in the day, I had a customer who took his apart. Bad decision, springs and pins went flying. He bought it to me in the proverbial shoe box. It was built more like a cheap cap gun than a real pistol.
 

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Back in the day, I had a customer who took his apart. Bad decision, springs and pins went flying. He bought it to me in the proverbial shoe box. It was built more like a cheap cap gun than a real pistol.
That is because it is not a "pistol", per se, it is a rocket launcher in pistol form.
Build as lightly as possible, no real reason for much of anything heavy duty.
Review other launchers, such as the "LAW" or the "RPG" series.
Just well constructed enough to withstand the launch charge, nothing more.
OK, the RPG is a bit more HD because it is reusable but, still, it is fairly light weight construction.

Would still like to see this concept revisited with modern materials and propellants.
 
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