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Discussion Starter #1
Some of us want to shoot the Vetterli-Vitalis; mostly in their (common) 6,5x52mm conversions from World War I, much less frequently in their original 10,35x47R caliber.

The shootability of the conversions has always been a topic of discussion since the First Board, and you are invited to peruse the pertinent specialised threads (which are again being made accessible here), before making a decision (I do shoot them).

But as to the heavy and rather undefined trigger pull of these guns, here is a suggestion from an old thread:

NoSugarTonight
Posted - 01/04/2004 : 1:24:05 PM
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Hi yall,how can I adjust or alter the triger so its not such a long and hard pull,the rifle is a 1870/87/15 swiss converted to italian 6.5



Carcano
Posted - 01/04/2004 : 2:56:11 PM
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The trigger pull is determined by a simple, strong blade spring. The screw on the blade spring can be turned to alleviate tension a bit. It will still be on the strong side afterwards.



twotoescharlie
Posted - 01/04/2004 : 4:51:16 PM
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use a shim under the trigger spring this will lessen the tension on the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Joe Turner
Posted - 03/26/2006 : 01:56:58 AM
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Also would polishing the sear and installing a lighter trigger spring help reduce the very heavy trigger pull? any help, cautions, tips are most welcome. Thanks you, Joe



airdale
Posted - 03/26/2006 : 08:57:16 AM
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Joe these rifles have a mainspring about the size of a valve spring for a small gas engine and a trigger spring about 1/16" thick and this will make for a very stiff trigger pull. I did make a new trigger spring from a long bladed flexible putty knife blade that lightened it some. Using the original as a pattern I scribed the outline and screw hole location on the blade and drilled the hole with a 3/16" carbide tipped masonary bit (a standard bit will not cut the knife blade) and slowly cut the outline out with a Dremel tool and cutoff wheel. This also makes for a great spare in case you break your original because they can be difficult to find. I would not mess with the sear on these old guns as once metal is removed it can't be replaced and parts are hard to get for them, its probably best to learn to shoot it with a stiff trigger.



Joe Turner
Posted - 03/26/2006 : 1:43:51 PM
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Airdale! Thanks for your response! I have gathered that parts may be hard to find for this rifle unless you bought a damaged or worn out one for parts but then you could have a pile of worn out parts! I will make a lighter trigger spring just to see if that helps. There is afair amount of bearing surface between striker detent and trigger sear and the mechanics of ths linkage may contibute to the stiffness but as you say parts are hard to find so I may have to live with a stiff trigger pull, which is OK but it would be fun to explore the medium power accuracy potential of this conversion



NebrHogger
Posted - 03/26/2006 : 7:14:44 PM
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The mechanism of the Italian Vett does not readily lend itself to lightening projects. I agree with airdale that a lighter spring is the most viable solution.



JPS
Posted - 04/20/2006 : 07:38:13 AM
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Yo Joe & Company,

One other word of caution regarding the sear on this and other black-powder period rifles. A lot of these older weapons were produced with mild steel. As a result, many of the parts that were expected to experience wear, like the sear, were case hardened to improve their wear characteristics.

I don't know for a fact that the Vetterlis fall into this category, however if the sear was originally case hardened, then once you break the surface, the metal underneath can be quite soft. Continued use once you get past the case hardened surface can result in very rapid wear and the resulting safety issues of a continually lightening sear are potentially very dangerous.

Case hardening does not always have the beautiful color that we tend to associate with the process, so even though the part may not have the traditional look to it, doesn't mean that the process may not have been used to increase the wear properties of the part. I would go the spring route if I were going to attempt to lighten the trigger pull. It's better to be safe than to potentially end up with a dangerous situation.

Hope this helps.

Warmest regards,

JPS

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