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I have a MO marked mosin. It was one of my first ones. The odd thing about it is it's practically new. The bore is mirror, bluing is like new. Best quality that i have scene on a mosin thus far. Did all mosins see action? i cant see how this could have been in WW2. Anyone else have anything like it?
 

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I have a MO marked mosin. It was one of my first ones. The odd thing about it is it's practically new. The bore is mirror, bluing is like new. Best quality that i have scene on a mosin thus far. Did all mosins see action? i cant see how this could have been in WW2. Anyone else have anything like it?
Pics please??... ;)
 

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I picked up a few months ago what I would call a couple of unissued 1943 Ishevsk's. I know common year ect. Well they dont have refurb marks and the bores are mint. The entire crate that the seller had all of them had a waxpaper "tube" in the bore. There is nothing that tells me this gun was used at all. I ran a patch down it and nothing came out other than an oily cosmo. There was no fouling and no carbon ect. I am not a newbie and realized what they had and snatched up a few. One is in progress of being turned into my "shooter" PU.
 

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MO marking is still not 100% surely meaning Ministry of Defense so it hard to say what this rifle was meant for use as. You fail to mention what year it is and that would help tell whether it saw action in WW2. Also all refurbs are basically parts rifles which means maybe the stock saw action and the trigger and sear but not the rest of the rifle. There are no guarantees or ways to surely tell what saw action for all intents and purpose. You can make a well educated guess looking at things on the rifle but really you are never sure what was with the rifle at that time.

Not having refurb marks doesn't in any way mean they have not been refurbed. Many early refurbed rifles came in with waxpaper tubes and liberal amounts of cosmoline down the bore and little or no wear on them. I have taken waxpaper tubes out of bores that were not in pristine shape and were obviously not new. That practice was just something they did with the early ones that came into the country. To me that means the crate had been stored for quite awhile and may have been bought at a very small price per rifle and the investment is now being used as many people are really tight for money in this day and age. Bill
 

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It is certainly possible your rifles were never issued nor fired in service. That the barreled action ended up never being assembled into a rifle, remained a barreled action and post war was put into the refurb chain with other used rifles and came out the end with parts put on it.. everything force matched and stored in cosmolene in those crates. I have seen some like this and all parts put on them were new old stock so essentially the weapon is brand new but not "original". The only way you could validate the bore was not shot is to use a bore scope.

My buddy took a bore scope and peered down the barrel of my first 91/30, a 1929 Tula which had all new old stock parts on it and the barreled action looked pristine. I could not get Sweets or Patch Out to produce any blue copper residue out of bore. The bore scope revealed the barrel had zero indications of firing besides perhaps a proof round. I am not a authority on bore examines but I will take his word for it the weapon has a perfect bore.. sure looks that way with my eye ball. Shoots wondrous.

The thing is, there are Mosins out there with mirror bright bores and when you find one... take it home !
 

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I picked up a few months ago what I would call a couple of unissued 1943 Ishevsk's. I know common year ect. Well they dont have refurb marks and the bores are mint. The entire crate that the seller had all of them had a waxpaper "tube" in the bore. There is nothing that tells me this gun was used at all. I ran a patch down it and nothing came out other than an oily cosmo. There was no fouling and no carbon ect. I am not a newbie and realized what they had and snatched up a few. One is in progress of being turned into my "shooter" PU.
Not having refurb marks doesn't in any way mean they have not been refurbed. Many early refurbed rifles came in with waxpaper tubes and liberal amounts of cosmoline down the bore and little or no wear on them. I have taken waxpaper tubes out of bores that were not in pristine shape and were obviously not new. That practice was just something they did with the early ones that came into the country. To me that means the crate had been stored for quite awhile and may have been bought at a very small price per rifle and the investment is now being used as many people are really tight for money in this day and age. Bill
I also have a '43 Izhevsk in similar condition to what nattcmars was describing. I've seen a lot of refurbs in every state of repair imaginable, but outside of unissued postwar M44s, I've never seen a Mosin like this one. All serials are complete with prefix, fonts exactly the same, you can tell it hasn't been scrubbed anywhere (no matter how strong or how oblique a light you shine on it). You can also tell the stock hasn't been sanded, anywhere there is supposed to be a sharp corner, there is, and it has deep, sharp CCCP cartouche and acceptance mark (although, sadly, they struck the cartouche crooked, and it's deeper on one side than the other. The shellac is a lighter color than usual, and is thinner. The rifle looks like they still manufacture Mosins and it was made about a month ago, with only a few tiny handling dings on the stock. It must have been made very late in '43 also, as it's the most smoothly machined and finished '43 I've ever seen by far-much of the receiver is as smooth as a prewar.

My theory is that 91/30 production had so much momentum going by 1943 that the sometimes ponderous Soviet bureaucratic machine allowed too many of them to be manufactured, especially since they were to be phased out very soon at this point. I believe that many of the late '43s that actually got issued were used very little but carried around enough to get beaten up and end up being refurbed (which would explain why you see so many refurb '43s with what are essentially brand-new bores. And it would stand to reason that the last batches made were probably never even issued at all, but put directly into long-term storage.

I bought the one I have at a gun show. The guy I bought it from told me that it was "brand new", and I thought he was BSing me. I thought it was just a refurb with an extremely nice bore, but that was enough to make me buy it(with an eye toward getting a good shooter that I could put some wear and tear on without worrying about its "relic" status). He had swabbed the bore out clean, but the rest of it was so slathered in cosmolene that I couldn't tell a lot about it. When I got it wiped off, I realized that he wasn't lying about it being "brand new"-at least to the degree that a 69 year old rifle can be.
 

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...everybody!!!...PHOTOS!...PHOTOS!!...PHOTOS!!!...this thread is virtually worthless without photos of ALL of the Mosins mentioned in the posts listed above...

...just sayin'...
 

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...everybody!!!...PHOTOS!...PHOTOS!!...PHOTOS!!!...this thread is virtually worthless without photos of ALL of the Mosins mentioned in the posts listed above...

...just sayin'...
Well, you're right, so here are some pics of the one I mentioned (forgive the poor quality-I can't take decent pictures of guns without help from sunlight from outside the window) . . .



EDIT: After seeing r0bb6ub9's post, I realized I forgot to post a pic of one of the main topics: the bore condition . . .

 

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I have a MO marked mosin. It was one of my first ones. The odd thing about it is it's practically new. The bore is mirror, bluing is like new. Best quality that i have scene on a mosin thus far. Did all mosins see action? i cant see how this could have been in WW2. Anyone else have anything like it?
Nice M O

I have a 1925 Ex-dragoon refurb that is in immaculate shape. Did it see action? Depends how you define action. Not everything went to the front ... lots of depots, bases, railways and borders to protect in an immensely large country. Was it in WW2? Well, it can be assumed it was in Soviet Russia during the time of the GPW so most likely yes. Everything else is pure speculation .. we will never know what our rifles did save for a tiny fraction with known verifiable provenance. We can make up stories but no one here will buy them, they might buy the rifle though.
 

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The possibility of a original unused 91/30 of late manufacture (1943) showing up in the stream of
tens of thousands of milsurp Mosins imported cannot be ruled out. Its probably long over due such an example did show up.

Its a nice rifle and if you believe it is what you think it is, then it is.

I cannot imagine how a barreled receiver could get blued without the interior of the action getting blued so I am no clear how Tplan can use that as a clue to its being a refurb. Or I don't understand his description or focus.

It may be made up of all original minty parts in post war refurb and Ivan did a marvelous job with his numbering of all parts. It that is the case, its still a wonderful example to own and shoot.
 

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tplan is correct, if the inside of the receiver is blued, then it is not original and has been arsenal refurbished. It sounds strange but look at a Finn rifle that has not been reblued or a Spanish Civil War rifle and you will see no bluing on the inside of the receiver. The refurbishment bluing was done by a different process from the original.
 

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It seems that there is a problem here. Some of the P38 "experts" seem to think that you can remove the Russian rework blue, "revealing" the original blue underneath. It looks like Vulch is saying that this is not the case. His conclusions make perfect sense to me and I believe him to be correct but "experts" say otherwise.
 
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