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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a rifle I just traded for, a light little small ring 7x57 Mauser by Greifelt. I have never seen another Greifelt in this configuration in my travels? The grip cap, butt plate and schnable end cap are carved from horn. Butternife bolt handle tucked in contoured to the side of the stock. Extra leaf on the rear sight base and very little engraving, very simple and slick! "Greif" logo to the bottom plate and butt plate. When do you guys think this one was made? I don't have proper screw drivers to disassemble at this time.. Has anyone seen another in this configuration by Greifelt?? Perhaps this was Greifelts answer to the Mannlicher Schoenauer??

As you can tell the claw mount uppers are State side remakes, but they are nice and tight and do feature the see-through feature as the period ones did.. :)

I have one issue to work out on this rifle..the set triggers are not functioning as they should..when the bolt is cocked the front trigger will not trip the sear without the rear set trigger being pulled first then it functions "hair" as it should. What would cause this? Could improper reassembly by a novice do this? Any insight on the triggers would be greatly appreciated!!

THANKS, Kevin.

 

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WOW, that's about perfect. Looks a lot like a BRNO 22f. There are probably some proof under the action that will date it. The B and U proof marks are german pre 1939. I am not a gun smith and I have never blown up a small ring mauser, but I have been warned by a trusted gun smith and mauser expert, so for what it's worth, there is a slight warning that goes with that dovetail on the front ring given it's a small ring. If it's a WWI small ring, then the caution should be doubled. I would shoot loads listed as 45,000 cup or below. And I would stay away from modern european loading and surplus ammo, can be hot or inconsistent. Federal makes some great ammo loaded for classic 7x57 guns, the 175 grain will shoot right thru an oak tree so I'm sure at moderate distances any american game would be handled.

Beautiful!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for comments Eagleye..and the warnings! This one is has the newer small ring action with the third lug on the back of the bolt, I hope it will be fine for any typical commercial hunting ammo? Kevin.
 

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I'm sure it will be fine. Here's the issue as explained to me. It's not a problem that's solved by a third lug. Lay your hands on some calipers. Start with the thickness of the front ring, you can see the thickness in that last picture, the front of the ejection port, measure right there. Now subtract down the thickness of that dovetail cut on the front ring, not super easy to measure but doing a little subtraction, you'll figure it out. The next part doesn't necessarily jump out at you unless your a gunsmith, subtract up the thickness of the lug race inside the front ring. Hard to measure in there but you know the race is at least as deep as the lug so just measure the lug. The number you have is a thickness of metal which is left in the top of the lug race where the dovetail cuts thru. It is probably a lot smaller than anyones original plan for a mausers' front ring. To compound the problem a bit remember that one of the Mauser's built in strength was the hardening system which surrounded soft with hard metal. The dovetail cuts right thru that outer layer. I don't know how much of a high pressure event it would take to rupture that front ring, small ring 98s with dovetail cuts aren't that common so we will probably never see one in our lifetime, even with the internet. I had a BRNO 21h with same situation, I kept the ammo mellow. I have some Norma 7x57 ammo which is wicked hot. It kicks like a 30-06 and flattens those primers right out!! That's the sort of thing I would avoid if it were my gun. It's far too beautiful.

PS- If you ever want to sell it, drop me a PM> Thanks!
 

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Seen the most beautiful shotguns but not the rifles...
Never heard of a 7 mm blowing up.... In a Mauser action?
USA ammo is usually loaded weaker.....I have read...
My concern would be bedding shrinkage next to recoil lug contacts...to wood...
I had a prewar Kornbush and sons...look as good very light weight .... Great condition 8 mm...
But had shrinkage in that area..
.if I had shot it before slight glassing it may have split the stock....?

And would imagine being old in good condition as it looks it will last a few more owners a life time of shooting pleasure.....
What is the value of such a fine gun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DK PHILLIPS, I'm not sure what the market would bear on this rifle? I felt like I did well on it though..

By the way, this rifle is marked on top of the barrel, "C.K. Ansorg Hof a/Saale", what do you guys know about that?? The shop that sold it in Hof Bavaria??

Kevin.
 

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Never heard of a 7 mm blowing up.... In a Mauser action?
DK- I am definitely not saying it's going to blow up, but before you throw caution to the wind, check that picture of the front ring from the left side and imagine the lug sticking up towards that dovetail. It looks similar to mine and I was amazed how thin that metal was up there. We aren't talking generic mauser, we're talking specifically about a small ring with a rather large cut out in the front ring over the lug race. I shot mine with no worries but I didn't shoot hot loads.
 

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I understand your caution is " needed to be heeded ".....and have read the same things you have....
but mostly in ....8 mm....

When any of us pull the trigger ."on a 100 year old gun..."
Things like this make you think.......
I may self sold that "two lug 98" no safety lug ....I guess small ring Mauser I had.....?

thinking....it's real old accurate....no scope but what if
It has hidden problems?
 

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A beautiful and quite interesting little rifle. I can't add to any knowledge base concerning the manufacture. Eagleye has a definite point concerning the 'strategic' metal of the receiver ring displaced by the front claw mount base. That would give me pause to shoot it regularly. I have a couple of these small ring "AZ mauser" based sporters where just the removal of nomenclature on the receiver ring gave me pause to consider! Such a scope mount system as utilized here does seem something of a concern for anything other than moderate loads!
In conclusion, certainly a rifle I'd appreciate owning!
Just my take.
 

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I have to agree with eagleye and iskra regarding their warnings. That deep of a dovetail cut in a small ring receiver has definitely reduced the strength in the most critical area. Don't depend on the third lug to save the old noggin. As far as the problem with the set triggers, a cleaning with some good solvent and a little lubrication may be all that is required. By the way, that really is a beauty from the old craftsman days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Alright my friends, I got around to grinding some screwdrivers to fit like a glove and was able to get the action out of the wood on this Greifelt. First are the marks on the bottom of the chamber, then the next mark is a strange one to me, looks like a weak strike..oval with small lines coming off the top? and possibly supposed to be something in the oval? Next, mark shown is on the receiver right where the barrel shank enters the receiver, its a "12". Last are a few more nice details to see..last 3 of the serial# inside the stock, and entire serial inside the butt plate.

O.K. I HAVE TO ADMIT, I was wrong about the front trigger not working unset also! Looked at it while unassembled and all was good, just not pulling the trigger hard enough after taking up the slack! Takes a harder squeeze than the Otto Geyger 9.3x62 I have that's for sure!, and the Geyger doesn't have the slack to take up either. Differences abound on these hand made guns I guess. WEll, look forward to your comments on these marks!! THANKS, Kevin.












 

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Already answered your question on another Forum:
This Greifelt rifle was proofed 12 35 = December 1935, obviously by the Suhl proofhouse. So the rifle is dated. 6.9 mm is the bore/land diameter of the barrel, not the groove diameter. At the proofhouse a cylindrical 6.9mm plug passed the barrel, while a 7.0 mm one did not. So the real bore diameter may have been as large as 6.999 mm. You have to add 2 times the usual groove depth of .1 mm = .2 mm to arrive at the groove/bullet diameter. The “7 mm” cartridges are named so for their bore/land diameter. “7 mm” bullets are actually 7.2 mm = .284”, as you know. The rifle was proofed for a nitro service load using the then popular 9 gramm = 139 gr steel jacketed bullet, essentially the same as the .275 Rigby High Velocity load. 57 (mm) is the case length, of course. The crowned letters stand for: B = proof load fired, U = inspected/viewed for defects, G = proofed for bullet use, N = smokeless proof.
I cannot make out the “crowned oval” stamp. It looks similar to the Liege, Belgium proofmark, but is most likely the mark of a Suhl barrelmaker. (import of firearms and parts was prohibited during the interwar years, and the Liege proofhouse applied this mark to complete firearms only) The other numbers and letters under the receiver, 12 and ND/5MYG/b are leftover factory internal control stamps from the original making of the Kar 98AZ carbine receiver at one of the German government arsenals, most likely the Danzig factory. They are unintelligible now.
 
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