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*The painting will carried out in all stations at home and abroad. Nov 27, 1940

7.When in use, fore-ends need not be removed from rifles having painted barrels until this is necessary for re-browning, or other repairs make removal essential.

Normally the rifles would be completely torn down for inspection once per year and afterwards everything below the wood line covered with mineral jelly (Vaseline). A war was going on so all the rifles were painted and the yearly tear down inspection was canceled. The rifles were only torn down if maintenance was required.

Mark Tropical Burma down as a "wondering zero painting requirement myth" and also only raw linseed oil was used on the wooden furniture or stocks (NO BLO) Sept 25, 1940


 

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It's great to see a new member cotribute so much informative information.

So green paint under the wood has nothing to do with tropical service.

Thanks Lord.
In tropical British colonies, gin was used to mask the bitter flavor of quinine, which was the only effective anti-malarial compound........


You three were only slightly confused, drinking green paint wont help fight malaria and Gin wont stop rust..............but the lime in the gin is green.
:laugh:
 

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In peace time prior and after WWII issued Enfield rifles were inspected by an Armourer four times per year, three mini visual inspections and one complete tear down inspection with even the bolt being disassembled inspected and re-oiled.

This painting procedure and skipping the tear down inspection was "If it ain't broke don't fix it" war time expedient.
 
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