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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a Greek 1903/14/30 carbine action for real cheap. Unfortunately I had thought it would be a 03/14 from stock pic.
Oh well. It's definitely something Rare! I collect ww1 only but will try to fix this one until I can get a war used example. Overall nice condition with trigger, bands, top guard. Ive got a bolt/mag assem coming.

I originally thought I might could mod a m95 stock to work, but action is too thick. Curious if anyone has one or somewhere I could get a custom new stock. Original will likely never be found
Door Wood Plank Rectangle Parallel
Wood Metal Pipe Plank Brickwork
Wood Rectangle Composite material Parallel Plank
Wood Door Tool Nickel Natural material
 

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There was one of these missing the rear sight on gunbroker a few weeks ago. That rear sight would have been useful. Some decent parts there. I personally wouldn’t even try to restore it but set it in the corner and wait for a more complete example to come along and rob the parts. That’s just me though. Good luck if you do decide to restore it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice find hard to come by in any condition I believe it is a 03/14/ 1930 model as stamped on the side rail..Stocks are really tough to find ...Sporter stocks are being produced though..How is the bore??
The bore is really good, it was still packed with cosmo when I got. Still a good pit packed in action. Ya its a 30. I expected a 03/14 or older.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes ill likely set it to side or trade off. I wanted a earlier example for my ww1 collection. But couldnt resist jumping on it. I'm looking at modifying a sporter stock. Unless someone with a original could get one duplicated
 

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So the star is then probably a greek or factory control mark, as i saw this on Breda pieces, but this is evidetnly Steyr marked behind the inscription on left receiver.
 

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Hi Andy - have just given my 1903/14 Breda 27 a superficial scan and a 5 pointed star is to be found on the tang, screw heads, nose-cap, butt plate, cocking piece and foresight.
There is a fancy cross within a small circle on the bolt release and a St. George motif on the bolt stem.
Of the theories on how Breda became involved, getting 1903's & 03/14's from the Turks sometime after the Turkish/Greek war in the 1919/22 and reworking them, seems to me to be the most likely.
 

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I dont known but have read when i remember correctly that Steyr salled of complete production line post 1922, so the simple way is this, personally dont believe turks in that period would be able produce or send so many rifles to Italy for conversion. Sct.George proof is well known i assume is on buttstock and receiver or barell. Prior this time i was in opinion that the five point star was located on Breda M03/14/27 bayonets, but this could be different way, i dont known that Steyr 1930 delivered even bayonets.
 

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These were original Steyr-made and sold to Greece. Breda had nothing to do with the 1930 System carbines. The small circular stamp on the side rail is Steyr's trademark. The Greeks loved this design, hence the original 1903s, the 1903/14s and the Breda 1927 rebuilds. According to www.hungariae.com/Mann03.htm

"In 1930, Greece purchased from Steyr Werke AG (SWAG), 25,000 6.5mm M1904/14/30 Mannlicher Schoenauer carbines"

I have a 1903/14/30 carbine that is littered with the open 5-point star stamp and suspect it was just a Steyr inspection mark. Hoffman & Schott's Handbook of Military Rifle marks" does not show this stamp in their summary of Greek rifles. Love the rotary magazine on these units, absolute genius design and fabrication!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'll get better pics. Almost all the parts are star marked.
Ive got a plan for a stock. Just need someone with a complete one willing to have it duplicated. Might can help others out with it as well.
 

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It would not surprise me if documentation were someday to turn up revealing that ALL the Greek military M1903 and M1903/14 rifles and carbines were in fact manufactured at Steyr, regardless whose name appears on them, or whether they have stars or crosses.

There is no question that Breda received a contract to supply the Greek government with 100,000 new Mannlicher-Schoenauer rifles, but one would have to wade pretty deep into the weeds of contracts, correspondence, and corporate histories, in both Greek and Italian (and probably German) --as well as to follow the money-- to figure out who really produced them.

M
 

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If one reads the Published History of Hirtenberger
Patronenfabrik, in it is a mention of Mandel, the 1920s-30s owner ( who managed to get out to Switzerland in 1938 Anschluss, being Jewish)
was involved with Italy with various clandestine shipments of " Austrian" made rifles (?M95 or M1903?).
It is thought that the Breda 1927 guns were A-H KuK Heer 6,5MS rifles, for complete refurbish, adding
" Breda 1927" to hide their origin ( after the War Reparations, Austria was prevented for Exporting Military weapons.).
Breda, at the Time, had a contract for 81mm Mortars with Spirit Levels sights, for Greece, and other Ordnance.
What the Italians found during the ill-fated Invasion of Greece in WWII, was that the Italian ( Breda) Mortars, with Water Level Sights, froze in the extreme winter conditions, whilst the Greek ( Breda) 81s functioned to perfection in the freezing climate.
( Water levels were cheaper, but corruption ensured they were charged at Spirit level costing.)

Doc AV
 

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Hintermeier is focused only on period up to 1918, so he dont have similar info. Anyway the bayonets were made by Italy. Question is the five star proof is a greek or austrian, as this is not typical for austria arms. When its greek so You will not find out it was made by Steyr or not. Austrian never stamped screw heads since 1895, as seen here are star marked all screw heads.
 

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Over many years I have examined dozens of Greek Mannlicher-Schoenauer rifles and carbines, and owned about a dozen myself. When found in original condition, the 03/14 rifles that are marked "Breda 1927" show absolutely no sign of being reworked or refurbished. There is no doubt in my mind they were delivered to Greece as newly-manufactured rifles. They exhibit a quality indistinguishable from earlier Steyr-marked guns. Even the machining patterns on individual parts are identical. That leads me to believe that Steyr in Austria was the actual producer, and had some "arrangement" with Breda for the sake of appearances, just as they did with Solothurn in Switzerland.

M
 
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