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I am considering buying a mosin nagant and would like to see some pictures of a "good" vs a "bad" mosin nagant. Expecially curious to what a bad and good muzzle looks like. Also are there any other things I should look for to determine a good one? And one last question to this is it worth paying for an ex sniper?
 

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Good vs Bad means different things to different people around here. Shooters want the best "shooter" they can get. Collectors might turn down a real nice refurb for a little money, and purchase a rifle that might not even be shootable for a lot more money if it is rare and unique. Which camp are you in?
 

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I don't have any pictures, but I'd say keep these things in mind when looking at mosins (Note that these are MY personal things I look for).

Good condition stock
No overly obnoxious pitting on the outside of the rifle
No cracks in the receiver, barrel, etc
Matching numbers, no Electro-Pencil (This is a personal preference)
Muzzle is Good, rifling is not worn through the bore all the way to the (especially) muzzle.
Bore is not overly pitted. The less pitting the better :)

Ignore anything you hear about passing up a rifle that is counterbored. I'd rather have 10 counterbored rifles than 1 rifle that isn't and needs it. It was done to help the accuracy in a gun that had a worn muzzle.

Ex-Snipers are cool, but don't guarantee that the gun will be super accurate. They can be worn just as any other regular infantry grade Mosin.

If you can go to a local gun show and handpick through a few rifles for one that appeals to you. Once you do that shoot it and see how she does! Mosins are awesome rifles, get as many as you can :)
 

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Good vs Bad means different things to different people around here. Shooters want the best "shooter" they can get. Collectors might turn down a real nice refurb for a little money, and purchase a rifle that might not even be suitable for a lot more money if it is rare and unique. Which camp are you in?
+1 "Which camp are you in?"
The funny thing is a couple years down the road your idea of a good one may change. I have 2, M39 Finns for example. One has a real "nice" stock while the other one is well worn. I've come to really like the character of the worn one. They both shoot fine though and that is "my" camp. I'm a shooter. On the other hand I have a 33' Tula Hex 91-30 with a fresh laminated stock and like it just the way it is. Go figure!!
Motor
 

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I am considering buying a mosin nagant and would like to see some pictures of a "good" vs a "bad" mosin nagant. Expecially curious to what a bad and good muzzle looks like. Also are there any other things I should look for to determine a good one? And one last question to this is it worth paying for an ex sniper?
Good:
http://www.7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinM39.htm

Bad:
 

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. . . Expecially curious to what a bad and good muzzle looks like. Also are there any other things I should look for to determine a good one? And one last question to this is it worth paying for an ex sniper?
The gist of your post leads me to believe you're shopping for a shooter rather than a collectible, so I'll proceed accordingly. First thing on the muzzle is to look for any bad nicks, etc. on the crown (end of the barrel). Along with your flashlight or bore light, take yourself a round of 7.62 x 54 with you when you shop and do the "bullet test" like this:



The first picture is a bullet test on a "mint" bore (on a '43 Izhevsk 91/30), the second a pretty much clapped-out 1937 SCW veteran Izhevsk. On a really good muzzle, you'll also be able to actually see the lands and grooves of the rifling showing in "cross section" as you look at the muzzle closely.

Also use your bore light to look at the rest of the bore-you're looking for a bright finish, and nice sharp edges on the lands of the rifling (as a bore starts to get tired, the edges begin to round off). All this is no guarantee that you'll get a good one, but it definitely helps your odds.

As far as ex-snipers, they're usually excellent shooters as long as you get one that isn't worn out. And there seem to be a lot of near-mint ones. Maybe a little hard to find, though.
 

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All good advice above.
How much do you want to pay? Is it intended as a shooter for target use or hunting or is it a collection beginning? Most people start off with an arsenal refinished Mosin from someplace like Big Five Sporting Goods at about $129 or so, safety checked and headspaced at the arsenal, imported by CAI, with force matched numbers, a refinished stock and a box of goodies like a nice bayonet, a cleaning kit and oiler and ammo bags. some prefer hexes, some round receivers, but these all are a good start. They also have been refurbed to look really nice and "new" and, other than an occasional front sight adjustment, shoot very well. Scrub off some cosmo, clean the bore really well, and go shooting.
Then the trouble starts because you start to learn more and want at least another two dozen of them in all their rarer variations, which means you get a C&R license. I'm up to over 35 Mosins and the boxes keep coming, each different from the last!
 

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I can't remember the source of this, but I think this is what the OP is asking.

LMyer

Here are a few old pics which I hope to help you a little. Dunno about the rest of the guys but I'd classify the bores like this:

Bore 1: corrosion rate 0 & (no wear, lands with sharp edges, intact crown)
Bore 2: corrosion rate 2 & (minor wear, lands with relatively sharp edges, intact crown)
Bore 3: corrosion rate 3 & (wear, slightly rounded lands, somewhat worn crown)
Bore 4: corrosion rate 3 & (severe wear, lands completely rounded, badly worn muzzle with almost no crown)
Bore 5: corrosion rate 4 & (notable wear, rounded lands, worn muzzle, distension in front of the front sight)


Here "0" means new bore and "4" is bore with bad pitting. This method follows a manual called Kivääri 91, rakenne, hoito ja käsittely (Rifle 91, structure, maintenance and handling) published by the Ministry of Defence (Finnish) in 1926. The book qualifies rates of corrosion as a scale from 1 to 4 and goes like this:

1. Incipient. Visible dark spots without niches
2. Little. Small niches visible
3. Sizeable. Same as grade 2. but with larger, distinctive niches
4. Severe. Large corroded pits with clearly visible edges




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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how does it shoot must have hell of kick.
 
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