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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
first post here and I have a few questions but first i'll let you know what my plans are.

I plan on reloading .45acp and .223 about equally but I also want to reload 7mm-08 and .280 Remington and maybe some 8x57.

my .280 Remington and 7mm-08 are both Remington 700 bolts. the .280 shoots nickel groups of three and the -08 is barely scoped in. both rifles use federal hi-shok 150gr soft points.

I am starting to look for components and I think that the standard federal ammo I mention likely uses federal 210 primers and not the magnum 215 primers. please advise on that.

I also think it is likely that the bullets for each of these is the 150-grain Sierra SBT but of course I would like to someone to confirm or advise.

I have a $100 on-line coupon for walmart and I was thinking of getting a turret press but people keep telling me to get a single stage. I can order that Lee anniversary or another lee 4 hole turret for around $150 (minus the $100 coupon).

I should also mention that I mainly would be reloading my .45acp and .223 for the ar-15.

Which primers/bullets and sources to you suggest for these also? I don't want to spend a lot of money on a press so I am thinking a lee product.
 

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primers and powder in short supply everywhere. Recommend you buy several reloading books and start searching your LGS and gun shows for primers and powder.

Primers are more easy to find than powder, so you may want to buy powder first than start looking for primers.

I would go with a manual progressive press. Don't rush and for gods sake don't crank out hundreds of rounds. Make 10-15 rounds, go shoot, see how they perform, than make 50, go check those out, than make more.

Go slow, put your eyeball on each case, make sure it has powder. Weight your charges when you start out so you know the measure is throwing accurately.

Oh, and get several manuals before you do a dang thing!

VA-Vet
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
thanks sub, I plan on going slow. do you have any info for the questions? how about federal 210 primers vs. 215 magnum? any need for that for the 280 and -08?

can anyone tell me what the recommended powder is for:

.223
7mm-08
.280
.45acp

at least this way I can start a search for the powder
 

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My knowledge is this:

Magnum primers for magnum rifles. If you load magnum primers in something like a 308 you need to back off the powder load about 10% lower than using a standard rifle primer.

That said, I've not loaded magnum primers so my knowledge could be suspect.

I would stick with standard primers for now. You got a steep learning curve (I'm still learning all the time).

And one last thing, if you find powder stocked deep in a LGS, there is a reason for that. Maybe you should not buy it...
 

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Make yourself a spreadsheet to organize your thoughts.
You need brass, powder, primers and bullets for each cartridge.
Inventory your current brass and put into the spread sheet.
You need 3 different primers. The Federal #210 is an excellent primer for for the .280 and the 7mm-08.
I have used thousands of them in many different rifle loads.

The powder recommendations depend a little on the bullet weights and types of loads you want to shoot.

For a beginner I normally would recommend a powder that fills or nearly fills the case so it is difficult to over load the rounds.
I use extruded powders for the most part but some users want only ball powders for ease of running through a measures.
Refer to your manuals for powder choice. You can look at the top MOST common powders that produce the highest velocities with the bullet weights you want to use. I always recommend a common, readily available powder. Many brands and powders tend to come and go. Some like Norma powders never have a good distribution network or store inventories so they are always a PIA to find even in good times.
The Alliant, IMR, Winchester and Hodgdon lines are the established line of powders that I would use.

For the .280 look at IMR 4350 and IMR 4831 powders for guidance. Then you can look at the equivalent powders from the other brands.
For Alliant that would be Re 19 and 22. For Winchester the pickings are slim and require magnum primers.
Hodgdon has H4350 and H4831. The .280 Remington is not a popular round so you may not find the most up to date data for each new powder that flashes upon the scene.

For the 7mm-08 similar powders to the 280 can be used depending on bullet weight. Slow powders for the 7mm-08 are the faster powders in the 280. I would recommend IMR4350 but you can look at the books and ask more questions later if you want.

For the .223/5.56 with 55 grain bullets - Winchester 748, H335, IMR3031, H BL(C2), AA2230 (recommendations in about that order)

For .45 ACP - Unique or 231. ( I would recommend 231 since it goes through a measure easily) However I have used a lot more Unique.

Ask more questions if you need clarification or additional information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks vet. I know powder is not plentiful but if I don't start asking questions before I start buying then I'll likely have regrets....so that's why I'm asking.

Does anyone know a good powder manufacturer for those calibers?
 

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You need a complete understanding of the reloading process and knowledge of factors that influence pressure in any 'recipe' chosen for a given cartridge/bullet/powder/primer combination... The questions you asked here, and many you would ask in the near future, will all be answered in any reloading manual's instructional preface.

Get a reloading manual and or instruction manual. Even better a couple. It is a Science and the more you know...the less chance you will screw something up!
 

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As I posted upstairs, all Lee Classic Cast presses have cast iron bases. And don't think the aluminum presses aren't strong enough to do any job you want to do.

You need at least 3 manuals and read them from cover to cover. I suggest ABC's of Reloading, Modern Reloading, 2nd ed. by Richard Lee (you'll get a copy if you by a Lee reloading kit) and Lyman #49. These are MINIMUM requirements. Several of the powder manufacturers (Alliant, IMR/Hodgdon/Winchester, Accurate/Ramshot) have on-line loading data that is safe to use, and Alliant will send you a copy of their Reloader's Guide by requesting one on their website.

Be extremely leery of loading data from individuals on the internet. There is far more bad information out there than good! Any information you get from individuals should be compared with printed data from several loading manuals for safety.
 

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As I posted upstairs, all Lee Classic Cast presses have cast iron bases. And don't think the aluminum presses aren't strong enough to do any job you want to do.

You need at least 3 manuals and read them from cover to cover. I suggest ABC's of Reloading, Modern Reloading, 2nd ed. by Richard Lee (you'll get a copy if you by a Lee reloading kit) and Lyman #49. These are MINIMUM requirements. Several of the powder manufacturers (Alliant, IMR/Hodgdon/Winchester, Accurate/Ramshot) have on-line loading data that is safe to use, and Alliant will send you a copy of their Reloader's Guide by requesting one on their website.

Be extremely leery of loading data from individuals on the internet. There is far more bad information out there than good! Any information you get from individuals should be compared with printed data from several loading manuals for safety.
+1, I bought a copy of Modern Reloading about 6 months before I got a press. Read it from the front cover to the data section in the back. I too was nervous about reloading, but reading and understanding the risks put my mind at ease.

http://www.hodgdonreloading.com/ is a good source for reloading data that will help you with powder selection, but keep in mind that they only give data for the powders that they make (Winchester, Hodgdon, & IMR)
 

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The Lee Anniversary kit is a good starting point for equipment. It will get you going and you can upgrade equipment if you need to as you go. The "O" style press that comes with the kit is very sturdy and is still the press I'm using 15 years later. Works great!

I only have the one manual that came with the kit (not sure they still offer them?) and I've never had any problems, but I do check online sources for cross-reference on any new loads. If there is an error in the manual, it could lead to a dangerous situation, hence the suggestion for more than one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I didn't see the data right away so thanks for it. I did some checking and here goes:

100 .284 bullets = $33 or .33 cents per cartridge
1lb pwder - 7000 grain/55 per case = 127 cartridges. $35 w/shipping = .27 cents per cartridge
primers .04c ents
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to reload the .280 Remington will cost about .64 cents each or $12.80 a box.
new boxes I've seen for $33. I understand the federal power-shok are now called American white tail.


the 7mm-08 I can load 152 cartridges at 46 grains....which is saving .04 cents a cartridge on powder. to reload a box would be $12



the .223 I can get 269 cartridges per pound or .13 cents each
primer still about .03 cents
bullets are about .21 cents each for the 65 grain
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so about .37 cents /round for .223

keep in mind these are rough prices and based basically on what midway shows.

I understand that steel case is not reloadable? is that true?
 

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Kursk
There will always be some eccentric with a lot of experience that will tell you he loads steel cases.
The facts are the steel cases belong in the dumpster. They are just a cheap throwaway case used by the world's cash strapped militaries.

Your reloading costs are in the ball park though they do not peanut butter spread the cost of the cases over each load.
If you are a careful loader you will get anywhere from 10 to 20 loads out of each case so the cost of brass is minimal and is where you save the most money.

Brass and bullets, not having a shelf life or being chemically active can be purchased at gun shows from old stock or left overs from someone that is getting out of loading. These sources can reduce your costs. I would not buy primers or powders of unknown history until you have been loading a long time.

I will make this comment about costs of equipment.
Most of us were attracted to reloading by the cost savings. The initial investment seem huge if you have not been using the same press for 40 years. Low priced equipment works ok for the once a year loader. You do not need the most expensive stuff but money spent on cheap presses and cheap scales is money in the trash can.
I would recommend that you spend the time to identify the best 2 or 3 brands and models of each piece of equipment.
Then find that equipment used. You will wind up with mixed brands but you will have good equipment that costs less and lasts forever.
Purchase good equipment used and you can always get 100% of your money back if you decide to get out of loading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thanks va. I looked at the links and there is a lot of random items that I would have no use for. I'll keep looking for right now. As far as steel is concerned, I can pick up 20rnd boxes of Russian .223 for $5.27 at walmart so those come to .26 cents a round vs the .37 cents a round if I reload. of course this is all based off of my numbers up above which can vary a little bit.

I will have to check out the .45acp reloading item costs next. I have about 425 wwb empties right now and another maybe 175 left to shoot. I use to make my own lead jigs for fishing but it is a pia finding cheap lead now. maybe I could use a lighter bullet and stay away from the 230 grn'rs.
 

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Powder for .45ACP has been absent for a year now and no predictions on when it will be available.
My preferred load is 4.5gr Bullseye. There are a few others suitable for .45 but none of them have been available either.
Large pistol primers have been fairly plentiful. Buy boxes of 1000 when and where you find them.

Casting has been discussed many times over in the ARCHIVES. Dig through for valuable information.
If you cast your own, cost of .45ACP is about $0.05 @ for powder and primer.
Best choice for mold is Lee 6 cavity 230gr round nose. Many other sizes and shapes are not available in 6 cavity, which necessarily cuts down on speed of casting.

.223 is coming back fairly strong and at reasonable prices. Many reloaders have opted for factory vs all the work involved as savings are not significant. Many say working with those little bullets is a genuine PITA.

Don't waste TIME and money on anything less than a good progressive press where everything is accomplished with one pull of the handle! Repeatedly going through different stages just eats your time and energy.
The Lee Load-Master has proven to be a better press than the Pro-1000 for .45. You can buy a more expensive press but you may not wish to invest a ton of money until you master reloading.
USED equipment shows up often on Ebay and sometimes less than half the original price. Tons of people buy expensive reloading setups only to find reloading isn't their thing and dump them cheap.

If, and that is a big IF, you shoot in large quantity, reloading is practical and cost efficient as the initial investment in everything you need will pay itself back in very short order.
Reloading is not practical for the casual plinker and will be more frustration than worth. Do realize the cost savings do not account for your TIME, which is a serious part of the investment and be prepared to commit to the necessary TIME to do it!
 

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Just getting started, I'd buy a RCBS Jr. press, cheap, like $15-$20 bucks, your dies and a good powder scale, and a
powder dipper set from Lee.
Measure each charge, do a slow learn process; learn the mechanics of reloading. A progressive press for a beginner, in my opinion, is not wise. They have peculiarities which can cause a major malfunction, if you know what that means!
 

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I buy all my powder and primers locally. In order to have the hazmat and shipping fee not kill you wallet wise, 16lb minimum order has to be done if buying from a vendor and its being shipped..

I pay 10.7 cents per 45 ACP bullet (lead alloy), I have over 2200 in stock. 5000 9x19 rounds, 3000 9x18.

Bottom line, stock up, you are one shooting away from another run. I'm good for maybe 2 years.

I buy when I can, use a pound of powder, buy a pound of powder...

Also, I've standardized on particular products. I have one vendor for 45 ACP, one for 9x19, and one for 9x18 bullets. Assuming world doesn't collapse, I can get more within 3-5 days.

I buy primers in bulk, when I buy. I won't bother buying 200-300 primers at a time, its a waste.
 

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Excellent advice.
You can adopt a trolling habit anytime you are near a gunshop ot attend a gunshow. Keep a list of what you need in your head or on your phone.
Do not be shy to buy a few years a head or to carry the cash in case you find a bargain. I have many bullets that I bought for $.10 on the dollar. Occasionally you will hit a jackpot. There have been several times I have left a gun show with $200 worth of ammo and bullets. After selling a lot of the ammo that I could not use, the ammo I kept and the thousands of bullets were free. Those days may be gone but there may still be bargains for old boxes of bullets compared to buying at a retail shop.


I buy all my powder and primers locally. In order to have the hazmat and shipping fee not kill you wallet wise, 16lb minimum order has to be done.

I pay 10.7 cents per 45 ACP bullet (lead alloy), I have over 2200 in stock. 5000 9x19 rounds, 3000 9x18.

Bottom line, stock up, you are one shooting away from another run. I'm good for maybe 2 years.

I buy when I can, use a pound of powder, buy a pound of powder...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
va - where do you get your 45acp bullets? I see that sears sells 5 lb ingots of lead for $12.50 equaling 150 bullets for .08 cents each.

can someone explain what the gas checks are etc.
 
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