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Been looking for a decent Glisenti 1910 & while researching I read "Pistols of World War I".
It states that only about 50,000 of these were made, everyone I have seen had a different letter prefix before the serial number or maybe it was just the letter F (getting old & can't remember). Why have a prefix if only 50,000 were manufactured.

I can't find very much on the history for this pistol, even "Axis Arms" has very little to say except they state 50,000 - 100,000 produced & that includes the Brixia model. Anyone have a serial number range, what parts were marked, etc. Just about any info would help.

Don
 

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Glisenti M910 Numbers

Italian Military Serialling procedure required a FOUR digit number with letter prefix(s), so all serials will start with a Letter or letters ( allocated according to manufacturer) followed by up to four digits...I have Glisenti revolvers with two letters, two or three digits, etc. But I have never seen an Italian Rifle or Pistol Without a Letter/s prefix. Except for the Beretta produced Auto-Pistols, and some of the heavier equipment (MGs etc).

So it seems that whilst the Germans and the Austrians used "a/A" to denote 10,000 to 20,000, the Italians used "A" to denote 1 to 9999, B to denote 10,000 to 19999, etc.

Glisenti (9mm G)M1910s are uncommon collectors Items, even in Italy, as many, to excape "prohibition" in civilian hands, were converted by re-barrelling in the 1920s-70s to 7,65 Parabellum/Glisenti cartridge, a "Non-Military" ( or permissible ) calibre.

And if anybody was foolish enough to use 9mm Para ammo in them (they are interchangeable), the gun would soon "give up the Ghost" ( come apart).

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Glisenti Model 1910

Thanks for the information. It's a little more than I had before.

Don
 

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Serial numbering patterns

Italian Military Serialling procedure required a FOUR digit number with letter prefix(s), so all serials will start with a Letter or letters ( allocated according to manufacturer) followed by up to four digits...I have Glisenti revolvers with two letters, two or three digits, etc. But I have never seen an Italian Rifle or Pistol Without a Letter/s prefix. Except for the Beretta produced Auto-Pistols, and some of the heavier equipment (MGs etc).
Dear DocAV, this is certainly hepful as a rule of thumb, and as a valid general observation.

However, for collectors as us specifically, I would like to add that some Carcanos will show exceptions to that rule. Not only the Moschetti TS "S" series (in 7,9 mm resp. 7,92 mm), but also some Moschetti TS 91/28 and even a very few M 91 long rifles from Beretta may bear, as an exception from this general pattern, only the bare serial numbers without letter prefixes.

Regards, Carcano
 

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Beretta 91/28TS without letter prefix from the period 1929-1934 seem to be often carrying Regia Marina (Navy) stamps or lack miliitary acceptance stamps, suggesting that maybe they were made under specific contracts for the Navy and for the TSN (National Shooting Association). There are also FNA-made 91/28TS from 1931-32 without letter prefix. However in the great majority of cases what DOCAV said holds true.
 

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In my small assortment, I have a 1929 Beretta M91-28 lacking a letter prefix. Serial number 4926. Having looked it over closely, I found no military acceptance marks or a navy cartouche.

I don't know what the TSN mark is, but the Beretta is quite bare of marks other than the serial number and a 'few' assembly marks under the receiver.

I have another ( a Brescia TS, I think) without a letter prefix, but since I can't find it, it's probably buried at the back of the safe. SW
 

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I don't know what the TSN mark is,
Tiro a Segno Nazionale, the national target shooting association. The "crossed rifles over a bullseye target" marking can actually have two significances:
- selected accuracy (most common);
- production destined for the national shooting association (there is an early Vetterli Moschetto TS 1870 in the NRA Museum, which was produced by Glisenti in exceptionally high quality of civilian finish, and which also bears this marking).

Edited: Here, this old thread proves to be informative w.r.t. the question :) :

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=4015

Carcano
 

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DocAV, Have another one for you. Any idea why Beretta used "F" prefix serials in 1942 and "G" prefix in 1942/43 on their Model 1934 pistols?
David
 
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