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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently received a 1908 DWM Gew 98 in what I thought was going to be original condition. It is mostly a numbers matching rifle with only the firing pin, safety, and floor plate/follower not matching. It shows some of what might be termed battle damage, or at least some signs of rough handling. No sanding or other improvement to the wood, which matches, too. The buttplate (matching) has a "4" and a script "M" stamped in it, so can I assume it was repaired at some depot during WW1?
That seems to be the kind of marking previously identified on this forum as indicating repair at a depot.
Also, after I shot it, I noticed that the muzzle had been counter-bored about an inch back. Previously, I had only examined the rifling from the breech end. It is in very nice shape, otherwise.
It shoots very well at 100M with the Turkish surplus, but quite a bit high with Romanian or mid 50's Yugo ammo. I will probably hand load some 200 grain jacketed mild ones, or shoot it with cast bullets, because of the 400M minimum Lange sight.
Was the counter bore a depot repair also? It does not look like Bubba has had his way with this rifle.
 

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4 stands for Cologne/Koln.Usually if a Gew was counterbored there will be a crown on the barrel close to the receiver though, around where the calibre marking would be. Is there such a mark on your DWM?

Congratulations on the new gew by the way; you should post pictures if you can.
 

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I have the same markings on a 1905 Danzig, both on the butt plate and on the stock itself. My guess is that both of our rifles were "battlefield rifles" or ones that were scavenged from the battlefield, inspected, and most likely sent back to a repair depot for a proper refit. My rifle also shows some parts that were forced matched (floor plate and follower), does yours have something similar ?

Sadly, bubba had his way with my rifle but she is still full of history. I aim on restoring her to full military configuration as I am just finishing getting all the needed parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gew 98

4 stands for Cologne/Koln.Usually if a Gew was counterbored there will be a crown on the barrel close to the receiver though, around where the calibre marking would be. Is there such a mark on your DWM?

Congratulations on the new gew by the way; you should post pictures if you can.
Yes, absolutely, there is a crown just before the 7,91 marking on the breech end of the barrel.
Since it was repaired at the Cologne depot, then that would logically make it a western front rifle, though I suppose it could have been used in the east and sent there.
Thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the same markings on a 1905 Danzig, both on the butt plate and on the stock itself. My guess is that both of our rifles were "battlefield rifles" or ones that were scavenged from the battlefield, inspected, and most likely sent back to a repair depot for a proper refit. My rifle also shows some parts that were forced matched (floor plate and follower), does yours have something similar ?

Sadly, bubba had his way with my rifle but she is still full of history. I aim on restoring her to full military configuration as I am just finishing getting all the needed parts.
The parts that do not match on my rifle have not been re-numbered, if that is what you mean by force matched. They are simply marked with different numbers. I assume they are from rifles that could not be salvaged.
 

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Generally (almost always) when salvaged parts were used for repair by the German military, the old numbers were struck through and the "new" rifle's number was stamped on the replacement parts. This was even done at the unit level, not only at the repair depots.
 

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Thanks TP, I could never be sure as I have rifles that fit into both categories (ones with re-stamped to match parts and ones with mis-matched ones). I always wondered why the parts weren't always forced matched but I guess it comes down to time, experience, and if the equipment is available ?

The barrel on my 1905 also has a crown with a styled "2" stamped to the right of the land mark of "7.92". From what I have read, this indicates a repaired barrel bulge. Since this barrel was cut down, I will never know the truth though.
 

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". From what I have read, this indicates a repaired barrel bulge. Since this barrel was cut down, I will never know the truth though.
Nabs , Where did you read that ?. Some years ago it was figured out with alot of data with loads of help from TP & Simson Suhl. The crown mark on the barrel shoulder and on gew88 receivers simply signifies a counterbore - nothing to do with a bulge. The methods of cleaning used by the typical soldiers of the day lent themselves to crown wear to the point of accuracy detriment. Hence counterboring of up to 1.5" has been noted as being period repair when accompanied by the crown proof(s) in the proper location (s).
 
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