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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every now and then I have to patch a stock where a piece has broken off or to fill in an area that had once allowed a receiver sight to be mounted and have only been marginally successful to get the wood color to match. Most recently, a 1903 Springfield in some kind of sporter stock that had a sloppy cutout for a receiver sight, a lozenge shape cut in the bottom of the forend and a butt "pad" that was some kind of really rotten foam material wrapped with equally rotten cloth and held in place with numerous tacks. I selected a chunk of walnut from pile of old busted stocks and carefully fit the pieces pieces. I then file them down and carefully feather sand them to remove as little of the existing wood as possible which does lighten the wood around the filler piece some. I have an old can of mahogany stain that has become quite thick that I rub into the patch and surrounding area to hopefully make the patch nearly invisible. This time it did not work so well so I bought a fresh can of dark walnut stain and tried that. Same problem, patch is much lighter than the parent wood as is the area surrounding the patch where I had to feather it in to make it all smooth. I have applied stain at least a dozen times, let it sit until it's thickened and sticky then I rub it off with a cloth. It never seems to get any darker than it was after the first application of stain. Does anybody have a technique to get these patches to match better? I do realize that there can be quite a range of light to dark with different pieces of wood but I figure that the stain would make up for that but do try to choose a repair piece close to what it is going on. Thanks for any help or ideas!
 

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Recommend you watch this. Link set to correct time (54:35), starts at "STAINS..." (and is on a 1903).

 

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A few tips.
1. Use leather die. This is key! Find a source (Tandy) and get 6 or 10 colors. Black, dk br, light br, burgundy, red, yellow,, ...

2. Save all your old wood stocks for raw material and match as close as you can the color and grain.

3. Cut out multiple experimental wood patches prior to repair. Observe effects of different colors and mixed colors. Also see how the oil and finish alter the looks. Never oil prior to dying. Always test how oil (or finish) works alone and after dying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for those replies and the video! I do have a box full of assorted leather dyes - I'll have to see what colors are in there. And I always save my busted stocks just for this purpose.
I'll let you know if I'm successful.
 

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Most of the wood stains have a sealer with them, so you get one shot at getting the color you want.
Dyes can be diluted and applied many times till you get the color right.

Then you apply the finish coat and watch your perfect match go to hell........
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Feibings mahonay leather dye did the trick. While still very slightly lighter, they are not at all noticeable. Thanks again the help!
 
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