Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
With the current ammo prices going up and up not down, I am thinking of getting into reloading. What are some good references to start with? I've started keeping my brass from the range. What is a good reloading press for a beginner? Something easy to use and maybe upgradeable. I would be reloading rifle and pistol. .223, .308 and 30-06 would be the most frequent rifle. .40 AND .45 most frequent on the pistols. Also what are good sources for components? Any hints and guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
Every novice reloader should start out with a single-stage press. Loading one round at a time is slow, but until you learn the basics of loading ammunition and all the safety procedures that go along with it, they are still the best. And besides, you're always going to need a single-stage press even after you graduate to a progressive type press.

While most people here will suggest brands like RCBS, Lyman, Hornady and the like (and there is certainly nothing wrong with these brands) do not overlook Lee Precision equipment - especially now that they have their Cast Iron Classic line of presses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
Cant go wrong with the big,solid Lee press. a LEE or a RCBS single stage will do anything most reloaders need. any of the major brands of press will do fine ( I like the LEE's price) where you dont want to cut corners is your measuring equipment, and a lot of the simpler stuff is best there also, dial calipers,beam scales etc over the fancy electronic/digital stuff, accuracy is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,855 Posts
get the lee turret press you can take the spinner part off till you get to learn the basics then put it back on for more speed and the head is good you set up your dies and just pop it out to change calibers, you just get heads for all the dies..i have a pro 1000 and has had over 20,000 rounds and turret press for the big work all my dies are in heads ready to go..about 20 sets and counting,, works fine and did not break the bank saved the money for a good scale currently a rcbs scale with the dial for my bad eyes and trembly fingers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Just to throw an extra idea out there, why not the:
Lee Hand Press
for the utmost in portability? I've got one myself, and it gives plenty of leverage to resize and such, yet it packs away into any place convenient for you.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
550 Posts
+1 on the Lee Classic !!


regards....roger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
you can have the quick change always ready option with most singlestage presses also, RCBS makes a system called "lock-N-load' and its readily adaptable to most other manufatures presses (I have a couple Lee's set up for them) you can change between dies in about 10 seconds ,all set up and ready to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
It all depends on how much money you want to spend. Just like restoring a car, you can spend as much as you like, as long as you don't want to try and re-sell it for what you have in to it. FWIW-

RCBS- Very nice quality equipment, very sturdily built, very expensive.
Redding- Same as above.
Lee- Good quality equipment, built pretty well too, not quite as sturdy as some of the higher priced brands, very inexpensive.

I don't have any experience with Lyman or Hornady, so I can't comment on that. I use Lee dies for most of my reloading (other than 7.62x39 [RCBS] and 7x57 [Herters}) and I never have any issues. I have several presses (two by Lee and one RCBS) and it is the hand press I use the most in my small mobile home. Try starting out small, with a single stage press as reccomended above, and work your way up to a turret or progressive press if/when you are ready for high volume reloading. Try searching the auction sites (NOT CommiEbay...) or the trader for deals on equipment, when it comes to a press, I've found that the older ones seem to be built better than the new ones, so used is just fine by me.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the help. think I'm going to start with a lee classic and take it from there. What about reference books? I'll pick up a copy of ABC's but any recomendations for a reloading manual? I've been watching the trader boards and missed a set of swede dies already.

JIm
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,234 Posts
Thanks for the help. think I'm going to start with a lee classic and take it from there. What about reference books? I'll pick up a copy of ABC's but any recomendations for a reloading manual? I've been watching the trader boards and missed a set of swede dies already.

JIm
Really any of the top powder or bullet manufacturers have good manuals I have always liked Speer's reloading manual .
Just remember start off into reloading slowly to you get a feel for it and feel confident in your abilities this way you force yourself to pay attention to details Good luck and welcome to a great new hobby.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
You should get a Modern Reloading manual with a Lee Anniversary Reloading Kit (version one or two, makes no difference), and it's a really good manual with a wealth of reloading information. Then I would get a Lyman's #48 manual. There are several manuals from some of the bullet/powder/cartridge manufacturers that can be downloaded from the net for free.

Whatever you decide, I would start out with no less than THREE different manuals so that you can cross-reference between them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
loading manual

Lyman Loading manual is great and also NRA loading manual if you can find one. As for the press, a Lyman Turret press has been loading for me for 25 yrs without a hitch and you can pick one up used somedays for a good price.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,191 Posts
You should get a Modern Reloading manual with a Lee Anniversary Reloading Kit (version one or two, makes no difference), and it's a really good manual with a wealth of reloading information. Then I would get a Lyman's #48 manual. There are several manuals from some of the bullet/powder/cartridge manufacturers that can be downloaded from the net for free.

Whatever you decide, I would start out with no less than THREE different manuals so that you can cross-reference between them.

I agree with this advice whole heartedly. The Lee book, Lyman #48, and Hogdgon Annual are my must have references.

For what it is worth, I started out with a RCBS Rockchucker (which I still have and use), and I use a Lee Turret Press now for my handgun loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
^Vihtavuori, Accurate and Alliant have loading data on their sites as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
reloaing

Go to Midway and look at the RCBS reloading kit w/the Rockchucker Press. I bought one 3 years ago when I got started. You pay for what you get. The Lee presses are not that great. I have no problems w/ their dies but for me RCBS has a better product. Start off w/a single stage before you get into anything else.
PJ308
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
The new challenger breech-lock press in Lee's anniversary kit looks pretty good, at least alot better than their previous challenger press. And at $150 less than the RCBS kit, it would be a much better deal, especially if you decide that reloading really isn't your bag. The RCBS kit is very good, but it is expensive, and it doesn't even have their latest/best stuff (e.g. their quick-change uniflow PM or their universal hand primer). Either way, you're likely to end up upgrading some of the equipment per your tastes anyway. Why not start out for less money, and save more for when you have some experience and a better idea of what you really like/dislike?

Andy
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I've settled on getting the lee classic cast iron. Challenger felt too light to me. I'm also going to pick up a lee hand press as well. I'm going to start with a RCBS 505 scale and I'm shopping for dies on the cheap. I just picked up a RCBS 30-30 set on the trader for a good price. Next is a couple of three reloading manuals, figure out what powders and start getting components. What are the benefits of two die sets vs 3 0r 4 die sets. I'm really liking the lee dies but just curious. Also are any of the lee loader dies convertable to be used on a press. I found some at at local shop in some of the more obscure calibers I'll eventually reload in and they were cheap but I don't want to mess with'em if I can't use them in a press. Thanks for all your feed back and opinions.

Jim
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top