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From the photos, that looks like a commercial Luger upper made shortly before WWI, sitting on a mismatched military frame. In its current configuration it is a shooter grade Luger, if it functions well, worth about $1000 or so. The thing is that if the upper assembly matches to itself, it may be more valuable split up as pre-war commercial guns are desirable. Hope this helps, more photos would help as would sending it to the dedicated Luger forums for their advice and observations. Jan C. Still Lugerforums
 

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I'd say it looks like a mismatched Commercial Luger from the mid-20s, especially because it has a stock lug and a suffix in the frame serial number (aka "Alphabet Commercial") but it could be a military frame. Let's see a photo of the right side of the gun if there are any Imperial proofs. Easy way to check caliber is with a No. 2 pencil. If it fits snug in the bore it's 30 Luger. If it's pretty loose, 9mm.
 

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I say that I think a military frame due to the military style numbering of the locking bolt. Cannon assembly has Crown/B, Crown/U, and Crown/G (BUG proofs) which is pre-WWI commercial markings and the same marks along with the 5 digit SN in the 40000 range on the barrel support that idea for the upper.
 

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Appears you have a good older luger, mismatched parts not withstanding. If you might care to take it out and try it, use commercial 9mm ammo produced in the US. Don't use military ammo or ammo produced in a foreign country, ONLY American commercial.
 

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Although not as common Tac - the Simson lugers were primarily aluminum bases (1925 on) - you do see Mausers more common in the 30's, but
During the Weimar period, new magazines continued to be manufactured with wooden bases. In 1925 the
Reichswehr issued a directive that new magazines would henceforth be made with aluminum bases although a
slightly later directive stipulated that army stores of wooden magazine bases available for repairs were to be
used up before these aluminum bases would be issued.
 
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Nice clean looking Luger

S usually stands for Simson, yet there are no Simson proof markings on the base of your mag. Simson marked up their magazines with acceptance stamps and the E/37 on the bottom below the serial number appears in your photo to be a TR proof mark.

You should determine the caliber of this pistol. If you have a 9mm cartridge, see if you can insert it into the chamber, if too big, then it is a .30 caliber. Most pre war commercials were made in .30 cal.
 

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Attached are some photos of my almost mint 1936 S/42 Luger with its 1936 dated very good holster. The original finish on the Luger is I'd say 98% + and the numbers all match including the aluminum bottom magazine, 775x There is even a stripping (loading assist tool) in the inside pocket of the flap. The tool is unmarked but was in the pocket when I bought the holster in 1987 or 88. The straw color on the small parts is also 98% to 99% and all original. The lettering on the back of the holster is "RYFFEL & BORN HANOVER 1936". The Waffen eagle stamp over WaA 380 is under the maker's stamp. There is no "P08" on the back side of the holster. This is one of my prize three Lugers and I've never fired it in the 35 years it has been in my safe. I must apologize for the blurry lines on some of the photos. Comments are welcome.
 

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Appears you have a good older luger, mismatched parts not withstanding. If you might care to take it out and try it, use commercial 9mm ammo produced in the US. Don't use military ammo or ammo produced in a foreign country, ONLY American commercial.
There is nothing wrong with quality European commercial ammunition. Sellier & Bellot, Prvi Partizan, Fiocchi, etc. Or even MagTech or Aguila from South America. I wouldn't shoot steel cased, military surplus, or +P loads in a Luger but any quality standard velocity 9mm ammo will be fine. Blazer Brass, Federal American Eagle/Ultra Target and Range, and Winchester White Box ran flawlessly in the 1916 DWM Luger that I previously owned.
 

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Kyle ----- I did not say foreign commercial ammo is faulty or not to be used in modern weapons. I'm only advising the OP that to fire ammo of unknown origin in a somewhat collector's piece (possibly 100 + years old) is not a good idea. I've fired a lot of Sellier & Bellot, Privi Partizan and Mag Tech ammo in several of my more modern pieces with no harmful effects and consider it very good ammo. If the OP really values his 100+ year old luger he / she should stay with US produced commercial ammo or shoot the ammo that is made up on their own reloading equipment.
 

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Kyle ----- I did not say foreign commercial ammo is faulty or not to be used in modern weapons. I'm only advising the OP that to fire ammo of unknown origin in a somewhat collector's piece (possibly 100 + years old) is not a good idea. I've fired a lot of Sellier & Bellot, Privi Partizan and Mag Tech ammo in several of my more modern pieces with no harmful effects and consider it very good ammo. If the OP really values his 100+ year old luger he / she should stay with US produced commercial ammo or shoot the ammo that is made up on their own reloading equipment.
I don't understand why you think US produced commercial ammo or any other US made product is superior. That is certainly not true in my experience. Any commercially made ammo is going to be just fine, it has absolutely nothing to do with the age of the gun. The steel and other metals that firearms are made of don't just magically deteriorate over time as some would like to believe.
 

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Kyle ---- You are reading your own ideas into my comments that simply are NOT there and NOT true. I haven't even mentioned one word inferring that US produced ammo or any other product might be "superior" to a foreign made product. It is true that JUNK products are produced overseas as well as some US made products are junk. As I've already mentioned above I've fired a lot of foreign made ammo and consider that ammo very good and of high quality. I have at least four (4) luger pistols in my humble collection that are over 100 years old and have not been fired within the last 40 years. They will likely not be fired as long as they are in my possession. My two (2) shooting lugers were both produced in the 1940's. I shoot only my own reloaded ammo in them.

I too find it a little hard to "understand" your lack of any comments on the photos I posted above of my 100% matching 1936 luger with its very nice 1936 dated original holster . You had to have seen the photos I posted above to get to the remarks I made on 9mm ammo. You seem to find a lot of interest in reading your misconstrued ideas into a few words I typed concerning a little advise I offered to one of the contributors in this forum. If you are even a little interested in lugers or any other military hand guns why no comments (good, bad or indifferent) concerning the photos ?
 

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I fail to see why I must comment on photos of your Lugers in order to comment on ammunition. In your first comment on ammunition it seemed to me you were saying non U.S. made ammunition was sub par. Considering the possibility that the OP may be new to firearms I was attempting to refute that as the OP may want to shoot the gun and with the current shortages may not be able to find any U.S. made 9mm ammo. Now I realize that is not what you were saying, and I agree junk and excellent items both come from many countries.

As far as Lugers go I find them very interesting and have owned two. An original finish mismatch that was a 1908 DWM commercial lower and 1916 Erfurt upper. It never functioned correctly and I sold it to a gunsmith for what I had in it. I also owned a all matching refinished 1916 DWM military model. But I am not very good at identifying the many models and variation of Lugers, so I generally do not comment on Luger posts. Being semi collectible in their condition I never fired either of mine over 100 rounds, but I did fire them because I won't own a firearm I can't shoot. I sold the second Luger for a $300 profit and bought a .45-70 Sharps which I'm overall much happier with.
 
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