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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up today a very nice Lebel 1892 revolver made in 1895. It was kind of thrown into a deal, and while at first I was not really thrilled over the pistol, the more I am reading, I am really liking the pistol and it's history.
Here is my stupid question, with the fall of France in 1940, did the Germans re issue the 1892 to the German army?, and if they did would their be any German proof marks to look for? I have looked my revolver over and I have found no import markings on it, so hoping it came here in 1945 in some ones duffle bag.
Thank you,
One of the few, Frank USMC RET
 

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Never say never, but I have never seen one. The Germans did however take over production of the French 1935A auto and many of them are Waffen marked. Most of the 1892s in the US came here in the 50s prior to GCA68 requiring import marks.
 

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99% of these don't have import marks, because they were surplused in bulk in the 60's prior to the 1968 import mark requirement.

Production of the 1892 stopped in 1924 so it is unlikely the germans would have restarted production and reproofed these.

Sorry, but odds are it was not a vet bring back. While it is possible a stray one or two could have been brought over by a vet, the 1892 stayed in french service at least through the Indochina war. Instead, the vast majority in the states today were bought from mail order catalogs like this one:

Newspaper White Publication News Font
 

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With few exceptions, captured weapons were not proofed by the Germans. The german nomenclature as Beute Waffen was : Revolver 637f for the French el 1892 revolver.
Enclosed is a link to a video on the surrender of an heterogeonous 20 000 men column led Major General Botho Elster. This retreating column elected to surrender to the US to avoid the humiliation of surrending to the French. but the true credit is due to the constant hassle by the French resistance.
General Elster is seen surrendering his handgun, a French 1892.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you!! for that information!!! I want to put the pistol on display with the weapons that were not German made but were captured and reissued.
Thank you again!
One of the few, Frank USMC RET
 
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