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How do collectors feel about swapping parts and such on guns? I'm talking like switching stocks or handgaurds, barrel bands, or any other part to make it more correct or correct appearance.
 

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Correctness is an OCD mine's-better-than-yours affliction of collecting hobbies in a quest for the mythical objective of perfection.

Practically speaking, I daresay most everyone will concede some repair, replacement, or swapping of parts is reasonable in some circumstances, but generally to be avoided unless necessary.

I buy Mosins and Turks because I do not care for the Garand Collector mentality. Interchangeable standardized parts exist for the purpose of easy rebuild and replacement to achieve functionality, not so that you can construct a frankenstein of components that share a manufacture date according to a fold-out chart in the back of an Official Collector Guide.
 

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Correctness is an OCD mine's-better-than-yours affliction of collecting hobbies in a quest for the mythical objective of perfection.

Practically speaking, I daresay most everyone will concede some repair, replacement, or swapping of parts is reasonable in some circumstances, but generally to be avoided unless necessary.

I buy Mosins and Turks because I do not care for the Garand Collector mentality. Interchangeable standardized parts exist for the purpose of easy rebuild and replacement to achieve functionality, not so that you can construct a frankenstein of components that share a manufacture date according to a fold-out chart in the back of an Official Collector Guide.
I LOVE that first line...!

When I replace parts, it's for functionality, to get it up and running for the range.

The 'Garand Mentality' is in no way limited to Garands...I like both my Garands the way they came to me: as legit, DCM rebuilds with great barrels. I bought them to make nice little groups of .308" holes in paper targets, and they achieve that admirably. They are no less a battle rifle than a rebuilt Mosin, but worth every penny. It may not be popular on a (mostly) Mosin forum to hold the Garand higher than a Mosin, but that's the way I feel.
 

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Umm, the answer is "it depends". Some guns had matching numbers in service, others didn't (a non-matching Luger is generally considered a shooter, while a matching Mosin-Nagant is considered suspect). Some collectors want matching numbers, some don't, some don't care. I would leave an all-matching gun matching, but not worry about swapping parts on a non-matching gun.
 

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I have become a raging purist, I guess...because, I just don't see the need to take a correct-for-when-it-was-exported firearm and change it around with other parts to make it "look-correct-for-the-era"...

...in my mind, that firearm just became a "REPRO" and not an original...

...that being said, it's your firearm...do as you see fit...
 

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In a fantasy world, refurbed Mosin's are all original matching. I suppose it could happen by luck or some other aberration, but if I found one that way, it would only be a small plus, in my book. I would probably suspect some well-meaning, but misguided individual did it, unless I bought it from a mass dealer who buys from the importer.

That being said, for my own purposes, I've swapped stocks to sell off a crappy one in the past. I've found that the fit isn't necessarily better, and don't waste any time doing it now.
 

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I swapped out the original magazine of my Finn M91 with a "jam free" modified one, and bought two replacement barrel bands, because the originals where missing the locking/tightening screws(I still have all of the original parts in case I decide to sell it)
 

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First, I would say, correct, for a Mosin is as it was when it left the arsenal. So, mis-matched parts is correct. I tought at times to swap parts around to make them match but never did it. I have swapped a few stocks from the refurbs to the era correct. That would be all for myself.
 

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When I buy a refurb (m38, m91/59, m91/30, m44), I intentionally only buy the best condition ones, no line outs, all matching (forced or non forced) numbers and outstanding bores and tight muzzles (except my lone M38 counter bore). I don't care if the bolt was a NEW and the magazine was a Tula , I don't even look at any of these parts to even ponder who made them. The weapon is what it is: post war rebuilds and I am happy with them as they are... I bought the best ones I could find, if they shot well, I kept them and if not, one of you has them now. No... I won't play that Garand Game of making a All Correct rifle and I lose no sleep for not doing so. I have many service grade (mix master GI parts) Garands and two Correct Garands (sold as such by CMP) and basically... A Garand is a Garand if high quality condition.

I understand those who want their Tula to have all Tula parts but I don't waste my time on such trivial matters. If that chase of parts and swapping about makes your collector senses pulse, I can respect it but I am not going to copy that waste of effort, time, money etc etc.
 

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In the world of Mosin's, why bother? Finns are always made of spare mismatched parts. As far as refurbs go, who cares? Unless a part is broken or otherwise unserviceable, I leave them as found.
 

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Most collectors would not bother. I have precious few original matching numbered firearms, esp Mosins. It is what it is, enjoy it for what it is.

Now if I found a Dragoon P series barreled action, I would put it in a correct stock as soon as I could find a correct stock/etc.

Pahtu.
 

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When I first started collecting MILSURPS, I picked up 2 M1 Carbines from CMP. I was facinated by the level of detail available on the parts supplied to each of the manufacturers and I decided to "chase parts" to get them as close to as-issued as possible. It was a challange and I enjoyed the hunt. Those were the only 2 of my collection that I swapped parts for. I also have a 98% correct M1 Carbine that I stumbled on and bought from an estate lot.

I don't collect for show - I shoot all of my MILSURPS. Like others, I will generally look to purchase weapons that have the "big matches - bolt, receiver, etc but that's not set in stone, either. If I like the looks of a rifle, I'll buy it and leave it as it is.

The only area where I would look for correct parts would be in a restoration project. I've only done one so far - an Enfield No.1 Mk III* that had been butchered, painted and discarded. I found it on a junk guns table for $40. In restoring it, I generally looked for correct parts as they were available. It's not a perfectrestoration but it certainly gave the old girl some dignity - and she shoots like a champ.
 

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I could swap parts between some of mine trying to make them more "correct" (example, I have a '37 Tula that's in an Izhevsk stock and a '37 Izhevsk that's in a Tula stock), but in the final analysis, that would make them less, not more, correct. Most of mine are refurbs, and some would say not that historically important, but the way I look at it even a refurb has been in the form it is now much longer than it was in its original form, and like Pahtu said above it is what it is.
 

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I'll always believe "correct" is how it comes from the arsenal. Anything else is, what? For instance, it was not uncommon for any manufacturer to purchase/receive parts from other manufacturers to correct shortfalls. So, for instance, if Saginaw needed some parts to finish a week's worth of carbines and they got some Inland parts to finish them up, those rifles are 100% correct as they came from the factory that way. Any guy that removes Inland parts to replace them with Saginaw parts is making what he thinks is correct, but how can he know? To really know, you have to know EXACTLY how the arm was made at exactly the week it was made (perhaps even the day). Otherwise, it's all just a guess. I imagine the same happened with the Soviets (and we know it happens with the Finns). Who's to say the 1944 Izhevsk 91/30 with Tula bands is incorrect? If it came from the factory that way, is it STILL incorrect? Do you know what that serial number block had originally? Really?

Now, some might be easy to tell, some manufacturers NEVER received parts from other suppliers. But many run low and have to purchase what they need from another company (it happens all the time, even today - do you really think you are getting Shell gas every time at the Shell station? Sometimes, you are not - at least according to the petroleum engineer friend of mine who worked with Texaco. Was that chicken really grown by Tyson? That package might really have Piglrims Pride chicken, because Tyson was running low that week and out-sourced).

But, that is just my opinion. There is perhaps a handful of really, truly, correct Garands and m1 Carbines in America. The rest are just assembled parts by some guy who has searched, sought, and gathered, then declared correct.
 

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Depends on the ovrall result _ I had picked up an all matching Hungarian M44 a few years ago but the stock was awful with no markings ---- I was at another show 2 years later and found a all mismatched m44 Hungarian on a perfect B2 stock ------------ Switched out the stocks -- Now have a perfect M44 and a shooter ----- Dont see any problem with that
 

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Depends on the ovrall result _ I had picked up an all matching Hungarian M44 a few years ago but the stock was awful with no markings ---- I was at another show 2 years later and found a all mismatched m44 Hungarian on a perfect B2 stock ------------ Switched out the stocks -- Now have a perfect M44 and a shooter ----- Dont see any problem with that
I agree with most of the above posts, and even agree slightly with your post...

...however...once altered like this, it has lost its historical significance and, as such, its collector value...

...just my two cents...
 

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I have no problem swapping non numbered parts on REFURB rifles since all the parts are jumbled anyhow.
Usually bolt parts to get them to operate smoother.

However this is only done to rifles in my collection I know I am not selling because some people find the "refurb" process a valuable part of a rifles history.
 
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