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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious, how far down the rabbit hole do you Garand enthusiasts go?

Do you own and use all the gauges and tools or do you just pay a C&R gunsmith to periodically inspect the rifle on a deeper level?
I ask because the gauges are available on the CMP e-store and I was considering buying them. I'm wondering if I'm geeking out a little too hard. :)
 

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depends,

Dad was a Small Arms tech in the USAR, and was one that did the inspections on the local schools and Army Reserve units in the late 60's thru the early 90's,

I have his tool box and at least one of every gage he used,

not just for the Garand,

but then again he taught me how to use them, and how to fix them, (as well as 1903's, A3's Carbine's, M14's and some of the belt feds etc etc)

so I can go really deep down that hole,

however, for the avg guy, collector, shooter,
if you are shooting a few matches, or plinking sessions a year, maybe get a field headspace gage,, and a micrometer/dial caliper to measure the piston,,

it takes a lot of rounds to shoot out a barrel, so those tools are handy, but most don't need them


if you are collecting, and want to make sure all is good, then a timing gage, gas cyl gage, the gage for the barrel dia at the port, headspace gages, and the piston gage , as well as the throat gage, would be nice to have (I carry one of each in my breifcase at gunshows , but I have tables)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@Lyman1903 Thanks.

I picked up an import M1. I'm taking it to a well known M1 smith in the area today for a butt-to-muzzle inspection. I was just wondering what to do after that. There's also a concern that this fellow is older and won't be with us forever. It makes sense to sponge his knowledge in preparation for carrying on in the future. I was wondering if I was just being morbid or paranoid.
 

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SKS GOD OF GUNBOARDS
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The average shooter will not need to gage his weapon. Remember in the military you are constantly firing ammunition either ball or blank through your rifle during training. That is the reason periodically weapons are checked on various levels.
 

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@Lyman1903 Thanks.

I picked up an import M1. I'm taking it to a well known M1 smith in the area today for a butt-to-muzzle inspection. I was just wondering what to do after that. There's also a concern that this fellow is older and won't be with us forever. It makes sense to sponge his knowledge in preparation for carrying on in the future. I was wondering if I was just being morbid or paranoid.

are you in Md? and would that old fella be Gus Fisher?
 

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@Ponder_Md

Are you good mechanically in general? Can fix things? If so you'll work out Garands in time, and the learning will add to the enjoyment.
I agree , don't believe anyone in the future will challenge the credentials of a Charles Maloney,Gus Fisher,or a Ted Brown.But thankfully these folks have shared much of their knowledge along the way that skilled gunsmiths or anyone mechanically minded willing to learn can follow in their footsteps.

The M14 is a passion of mine slightly more than the M1 but just slightly. I'm not a trained Gunsmith per say but I am a trained experienced machinist of 34 years.These two go together.That's why I went to trade school so I could learn to do my own gunsmithing.

Gages are great field service tool as that's what there meant for ,nothing beats actually physical measuring with precision measuring equipment though.

Jerry Kuhnhausin's .30 cal shop manual is a must ,mines about wore out as its been referred to many times . I have the 1970 AMTU Accurizing manual , US ARMY ORDNANCE sub courses on Shoulder fired and small arms ,good info in these .

Now I am not a match shooter and have never built a NM rifle .All of which is outlined in the above media . I'm considering learning this aspect as I have both an original SA NM M14 stock and a AMTU modified M14 stock that are waiting to be built .

My main focus has been acquiring and building service type as issued with best available parts .Which function and shoot as designed.
 

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Once it has been gone through and checked-out by a qualified Armorer, all you should have to do is clean it, lube it, and shoot it.

I wouldn't bother with buying gauges and such - save your money for ammo!

If everything is in-spec there won't be any serious work needed for a long time. Buy a few good books so you know how the rifle operates and can diagnose any issues if they arrise.
 

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Once it has been gone through and checked-out by a qualified Armorer, all you should have to do is clean it, lube it, and shoot it.

I wouldn't bother with buying gauges and such - save your money for ammo!

If everything is in-spec there won't be any serious work needed for a long time. Buy a few good books so you know how the rifle operates and can diagnose any issues if they arrise.
Agreed, these are pretty durable rifles.
 
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