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Slam fires are not uncommon with Garands. Military rifles have free floating firing pins that move inside the bolt. When the bolt stops it's forward movement, the firing pin lags behind just slightly and continues forward striking the firing pin when the bolt comes to a stop. Slam fires are most common when single loading. The action of the bolt stripping a round out of the clip is enough to slow things down and keep the firing pin moving with the bolt. Don't dismiss a high primer in the ammo, but this isn't too often seen in MILSURP ammo.
A series of events is usually the cause, not just one mechanical fault or glitch. Most slam fires occur when the round is seated nearly all of the way into the chamber and the bolt has nothing to slow it down as it moves forward over the bullet guide. Easiest way to avoid a slam fire is to make sure the round is only about a third of the way into the chamber and to hold onto the oprod and let it go after the bolt face is about half way over the bullet guide. There is no guarantee that you will never get another, but these are the easiest things to do to reduce the possibility of them occurring in the future regardless of the source of the ammo.
Good luck in the future
 

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The strike on the slam fire case was a light strike that was just hard enough to set off the round so it's not going to look like the others.
Slam fires are not an out of battery occurrence. The pin strikes the primer just as the bolt locks into battery.
 

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I've did quite a bit of research and reading from various sources while developing a handload for the Garand. If you look enough for handloads, you'll start seeing a lot about slam fires.
 
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