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Colorful Luftwaffe pic.
 

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I love the Focke-Wulf. I believe it with a few more modifications it would have given the P51 a run for its money.
 

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nice

Very interesting. A tight unit. Planes appear to be in alphabetical order, props all in line, very neat.
I wonder what unit it was and where. Looks like the channel/sea in the back ground.
 

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Pretty ship shape looking group of planes.

Regards
Art
 

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Definitely. Very squared away.

Poot
 

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Short engines....early war years. Dr.tank sure did build a workhorse there, and they were improved with a longer, stronger engine.
There werent many years the Germans could line them up outside that way.....and not see them burning.
 

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There werent many years the Germans could line them up outside that way.....and not see them burning.
HAHAHAHA!!

Very nice picture!!
 

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The TA 152 was the late war follow on to the FW 190, longer fuselege, longer wings/round tips and an inline engine.

Somewhere I've got a photo of 2 restored FWs setting at an airfield, I believe, in Texas. I can't find it.
Here is an FW whose pilot thought he was a jr birdman. Got this out of the WW 2 Luiftwaffe magazine Der Adler.
Well I guess I won't put up a photo. It's to big and I can't resize it.
Sarge
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Somewhere I've got a photo of 2 restored FWs setting at an airfield, I believe, in Texas. I can't find it.
Here is an FW whose pilot thought he was a jr birdman. Got this out of the WW 2 Luiftwaffe magazine Der Adler.
Well I guess I won't put up a photo. It's to big and I can't resize it.
Sarge
Send 'em to me. I'll re-size 'em and put 'em up for you.

Jay
 

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russian front. denoted by the yellow band on the fusalage. did well at modarate altatudes. but the '51 ruled up on high. ive seen pics of the long nose ones. they used the radials for fighter bombers.
 

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I read an article about the Ta-152 a while back. I loved the part in it where it said Tank took the 152 up for a flight and was jumped at high alt. by 2 P-51s. To escape all he did was open the throttle, with a top speed of just over 470mph it made his escape easy.
I think the Ta-152 was developed to attack high alt. recon flights. I'm not sure about how nimble it was, I think the wings were too long for that.
 

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I have a book that was written by a RAF test pilot. During and after WWII his job was to analyze & fly captured German aircraft. I don't remember exactly what he said about the FW190's but in general I remember that his analysis of German aircraft was very good. But naturally not as good as the Spitfire.

Remember too that during WWII (especially after 1943) that all German fighter aircraft were made by slave labor with almost no quality control.
 

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Quality control was good enough for most of the aircraft to fly right and do the jobs assigned, slave labor in the factories or not

Eric Brown was probably the RNAS (not RAF) pilot you are remembering, Mr. Golden. He wrote two or three books about his test flying, both during and after the war. He thought well of the FW-190, considered it essentially the equal of any contemporary Spit or Mustang, outcome of a fight depending on quality of pilot since the airplanes were essentially equal in combat quality.

I'll disagree about the Ta-152 being the prettiest of the FW-190 line and suggest that "Langnase Dora" (FW-190D) deserves that. Some consider the Dora the bird most equal to the P-51. I'll have to defer to others in that regard as I don't drive airplanes.
 

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Built to do a job.
The English didn't call the FW190's 'The Butcher Birds' for nothing.
Designer Kurt Tank named it "Wurger" which means Shrike,a bird which impaled its prey on thorns to make it easier to eat,the Shrikes nickname is Butcherbird.
 

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The Ta-152 was the finest-looking of the Fw's -- a picture is worth a thousand words-
JohnB/
I think the TA-152 was one of the most technologically advanced a/c in WWII.It was used to experiment with the ejection seat. The engine was taken from their bomber forces (JU-88), b/c the daimler benz 603 high altitude engine had teething problems especially with turbo-supercharging.The engine was the Junkers Jumo 213 used. It had some trouble but it worked ok. The a/c also had bladder fuel cells not commonly used. The wing was designed like they are today with round access panels underneath to remove fuel cells and inspect for stress cracks in wing ribs .There's a lot more advances the a/c was used so therefore I think it was a wonderfully beautiful bird if you're a gear head like me.Ha!
 

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Quality control was good enough for most of the aircraft to fly right and do the jobs assigned, slave labor in the factories or not

Eric Brown was probably the RNAS (not RAF) pilot you are remembering, Mr. Golden. He wrote two or three books about his test flying, both during and after the war. He thought well of the FW-190, considered it essentially the equal of any contemporary Spit or Mustang, outcome of a fight depending on quality of pilot since the airplanes were essentially equal in combat quality.

I'll disagree about the Ta-152 being the prettiest of the FW-190 line and suggest that "Langnase Dora" (FW-190D) deserves that. Some consider the Dora the bird most equal to the P-51. I'll have to defer to others in that regard as I don't drive airplanes.
The DORA 9 was a nice bird. It's best attributes was , it could dogfight with the best of them . Actually the DORA and the 152 was almost identical. The 152 was about 1.5 ft. longer and wingspan was in some models (high altitude) about 6 ft. longer and thinner to accomodate the higher altitude. The 152 was'nt designed to dogfight at low altitude. It was made to shoot down B-29 bombers when they arrived in the european theater of operations.It's altitude was about 50,000 ft.as a service ceiling.
 
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