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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired a Lithgow No1Mk3* 1943, FTR'd in 1955 for the Air Force. All matching numbers, apart from the lower handguard timber which was close (rifle E72963, handguard E72398). I suspect that during FTR the wrong timber was incorrectly replaced.

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Anyway, the trigger was single stage, very creepy and unpredictable.
I started by reassembling the rifle without the wood, and by careful bending of the magazine housing to alter the trigger angle, I achieved a nice 2-stage trigger.
Good, until I reassembled it with the wood and it returned to single stage.
Peter Laidler's notes suggested the only way to fix it was to stone down the first hump on the trigger. I started doing this, then realised I would need to just about remove the entire hump to achieve a workable trigger.
Other books suggested the trigger guard needed to be dead straight. I did this, and it made it worse.
I eventually realised I was on the money with my original plan of bending the magazine housing, but when I reassembled it with the (non-matching) wood, the poor fit resulted in it being bent out of shape again.
The correct angle for my rifle, I found, was a straight line along the magazine well to the top of the hump where the trigger pivot pin goes. This gave a perfect 2-stage pull.

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I then had to remove some wood from the magazine cutout using a tiny chisel, all the time worried I might be buggering the whole thing up. Eventually I achieved a good fit by trimming these areas:

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The triggerguard could now be fitted without any tension, so it kept the necessary bend.
It all goes to show that Enfields require fitting, even with different timber from the same factory and probably the same batch.
Enfields... always learning.
 

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Oooooh, thank you, I have one like this. It all makes perfect sense now!

Man, have I been barking up the wrong tree.
 

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Yet there are those who prefer a single stage trigger. Trigger guard bending and even soldering a piece of heavy wire between the ‘lumps’ to achieve it.
Now you’ve gone and possibly undone someone’s hard work!;)
 

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THANK YOU! :)
Perfect timing for me, I am just starting in on this and am rushing madly about reading and adding to my library of things Enfield.
Great pictures and discussion
Ed
 

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Yet there are those who prefer a single stage trigger. Trigger guard bending and even soldering a piece of heavy wire between the ‘lumps’ to achieve it.
Now you’ve gone and possibly undone someone’s hard work!;)
All right, what are the lumps and humps you guys are referring to? I will never master speaking Enfield. Draw, knacker, cheeky, chuffed, bodged, knees up, naff......huh? How are we English speaking folks supposed to understand?
 
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Ha Ha, Yes quite, a language all its own, it is!

I find new phrases to add into my lingo all the time.
 

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All right, what are the lumps and humps you guys are referring to? I will never master speaking Enfield. Draw, knacker, cheeky, chuffed, bodged, knees up, naff......huh? How are we English speaking folks supposed to understand?
Do you really think you speak English English ? (even the computer gives me a choice of English English or American English)

"One nation divided by two languages".
 

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Protrusions on the rear face of the trigger. Kind of like the humpback bridge ahead road sign.
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Do you really think you speak English English ? (even the computer gives me a choice of English English or American English)

"One nation divided by two languages".
3857277
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All right, what are the lumps and humps you guys are referring to? I will never master speaking Enfield. Draw, knacker, cheeky, chuffed, bodged, knees up, naff......huh? How are we English speaking folks supposed to understand?
Fairy's nuts. There may be some fancy armourer's term for them, but they are "lumps" on the front face of the trigger.
The sear contacts the lower "lump" first, and as you pull the trigger, this lower lump moves the sear down until it just engages the cocking piece. This is the first trigger pressure.
The sear then encounters the upper "lump". As you pull the trigger further, this upper lump should then crisply release the sear from the cocking piece (the second trigger pressure). Being closer to the pivot pin, there is less mechanical advantage and hence the second trigger pressure is higher than the first.
See the excellent articles by Peter Laidler Part 1 and Part 2. He refers to the "lumps" as "ribs", which to an American will mean "beef spare ribs" and be even more confusing.
As confusing as Father's Day in Tasmania, eh?
 

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Beef ribs,Pork ribs y’all done triggered a bloke’s appetite with reference to them two speed bump looking hump’s. 😬😉
 
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