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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this one recently. It seems to be an old studio portrait of russian soldier, which has been used later as a postcard. This frontovik wears m1935 winter uniform, budionovka and holstered Nagant m1895 revolver.

On the background, there's some writing. The most interesting part is that the writing seems to be german, because of the letter "ü's" seen on the text. There were german speaking minorities and emigrant communists in Soviet union so it's not totally uncommon. I don't know for sure if the guy in the picture and the writer of the greetings are even the same person. It's always possible that the picture is actually somekind of commercial postcard. The history is also unclear, how it arrived here to Finland. It's always possible that it has been taken from fallen or captured russian soldier as souvenier in the winter war or early continuation war.

I have framed the picture and it hangs in the wall of my gunroom. Not as trophy, but more as tribute. It would be nice to know what's written on the back side.
 

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"for my comrade Martin, in memory of <<can't read>> of communists and Red Guards"

The formation of the letters is almost like a combination of Suetterlin and Cyrillic cursive.
 

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Wee I think he is wearing his acedemy dress great coat. See the fancy bar straps for the button not found on a combat great coat.
 

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Could the word that is difficult to make out or read be a Russian word inserted into the German letter? Perhaps some Russian/Soviet word that would have been known to the letter writer and the recipient?

Interesting photo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"for my comrade Martin, in memory of <<can't read>> of communists and Red Guards"

The formation of the letters is almost like a combination of Suetterlin and Cyrillic cursive.
Thank you very much munrod. Your help is most appreciated

Wee I think he is wearing his acedemy dress great coat. See the fancy bar straps for the button not found on a combat great coat.
Yes indeed, I'm not an expert on soviet overcoats, I hardly know the basics, but could it be even older model like m27?

Could the word that is difficult to make out or read be a Russian word inserted into the German letter? Perhaps some Russian/Soviet word that would have been known to the letter writer and the recipient?
Interesting point. Could it be somekind of russian word or phrase, which is untranslateable to german or other western languages?

Thanks for your replies guys. All the additional info is more than welcome.
 

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The missing word seems to be Wladiwostok (Vladivostok) and the signature, Elen Fernowka.
I think you're right. It looks obvious once pointed out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The missing word seems to be Wladiwostok (Vladivostok) and the signature, Elen Fernowka.
I think you're right. It looks obvious once pointed out.
Thank you very much for your help.

What do you think, the soldier on the picture, "he" or "she" ?

Looks little bit like a "she" to me. Maybe Ellen Fernovka herself.
 
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