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Bayonetcollector
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Posted - 07/25/2006 : 7:05:35 PM Now here's a pic that speaks volumes...

I believe this is of soldiers resting behind the front. Sadly there's no date or writing on it.

I notice a few things:

Two of them are smoking those huge porcelain pipes. The 5th army recieved pipes like this as christmas gifts in 1914, though these were common everywhere with painted pictures of the Kaiser, the crown prince, humourous images (reservistenpfeifen...), patriotic images etc...

One of the smokers doesn't fit into his feldbluse at all... I don't suppose he got fat at the front
. Was that all they had to issue to him? Shortages?

They are in front of a door with a sign saying "Officers kitchen, entry prohibited". Organized, not a house taken yesterday.

The building appears damaged. There are holes in the wall. Some might be shrapnel/bullet holes. Four of the holes appear to be from shutter hinges torn from the wall. On the window on the right this appears to have been freshly repaired with the hinges put back with new mortar (no not the grenade launcher "mortar", the civilian kind...
). The window on the left is obviously used as an entrance with stairs added, why? was the front entrance too dangerous? Might this be that close to the front?



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Any comments are welcome.
Big commander
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member


Belgium
967 Posts
Posted - 07/25/2006 : 9:45:09 PM For me this is the typical rearside of a large building (19th century castle, abby, townhall etc), the frontside would have had better and heavier wood for the windows and door. The stone stairs would also have a more beautiful design. The artists entrance so to speak. I see the holes were the hinges were, but no bulletholes. In that kind of, rather expensive, natural stone bullets would have chipped away circles of at least 2 to 5 inches in diameter. Maybe the door led to the kitchen itself and the stock of food. The simple stair at the window could have been the entrance for "the working class". Let's not forget that officers in those days were treated, certainly more as now, as a breed apart.
The small Feldbluse is amusing, should he have been the chief cook and holder of the key to the wine cellar?
Ubique fidelis et fortis
(1st recce)
Bayonetcollector
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Norway
1471 Posts
Posted - 07/26/2006 : 05:16:34 AM I agree, it looks like the rear of a building. The damage I was thinking of is above the window with the stairs, in the ornament there (What is the english word for Gesims?). Also there is some to the left of that window. You may well be right that the damage should have been more extencive if it was bulet holes, but to me it looks a lot like the marks on the battle damaged buildings I've seen (in Berlin for instance.)

The stairs up to the window might indeed be for the lower ranks, though it is a puzzling entrance... I don't think that is how the building was originally designed, loks more like it was adapted by some creative souls for military use.

From the torn down shutters I believe this might have been an abandoned building that was locked and closed and that had to be opened by force to be put to military use.
 

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ChipM
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Posted - 07/30/2006 : 10:27:54 PM Given that the soldier in the picture has Brandenburg cuffs, he most likely was in the infantry. The shoulder strap number could be for the 38.Infantry Regiment, the 38.Res.Inf.Rgt., the 38.Landwehr Inf.Rgt., etc. There is no way to tell which. The shoulder strap is the early 1915 simplified pattern that still included a tongue, though the piping was dropped. Soon after, the tongues were dropped as well.

The two side belt hooks (Haken) would have been in a pebbled brass or nickel. These would have been present on all issue tunics. So in total, the tunic had four supports, the two tail button/supports and the two side hooks.

Chip
 

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Now this one I got because of the unit stamp, not the picture. First of all it is from Brest-Litowsk where the Soviet union signed their separate peace with Germany. Secondly it was sent from Uhlan regiment number 5. It was sent the 9th of september 1917.

Frau v(on)Canstein
Dortmund
Baristr(?) 5

Liebe Eltern,
Mir gehts ausgezeichnet. Euch hoffentlich geht es auch gut.
Reite (Reise?) heute nachmittag mit Re(g)iment(?) aus. Heute abend mehr? Gruss Cal...(?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bilek, Serbia (Now bosnia?)

Adresse
9 Landsturmregiment
11 Compagnie
3 Bataillon
Barakkenlager VI . VII
Bilek (Feldpost)

Receiverpart:

Feldpost - Karte
Wohlg. Frau
Marie Güttler
Tischler(...?) Gattin (Spouse of a carpenter...?)
in Böhm - Kahe(?)
bei Aussig an der Elbe
Nord-Böhmen
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here are a couple of photos from a man of few words...

These are both sent in March 1916, to another soldier (relative?). He is not one to say much, to say the least. Nice pics, he won the Iron Cross class II, so I suppose he saw a bit of action...


First card:

In the field, the 19th of March, 1916

My dear Walter:

With heartfelt greetings from your brother-in-law,

Hans


Second card:

The 24th of March, 1916

Many heartfelt greetings from your Hans.



Both cards addressed to Gefreiter Walter Voeller. [??L_malkalven??] Landwehr Inf Regt 82, fifth Batl, 2 Company
 

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Here's a card printed to honour the memory of Joseph Müller.

He was an economists son from Aufing bei Bernau and was a soldier in the 15th bavarian reserve infantry regiment, 10th company.

His fate was parallell to Heinrich Fabers, except for one crucial point. Both were wounded at Verdun, and were sent to hospitals in Germany. Müller was sent to Freiburg in Breisgau after being severely wounded. The difference is, of course, that Müller did not survive his injuries.... He died on the 13th of march 1916, an early casualty of that long battle.

The German War graves commission (Volksbund) have Joseph Müller listed. Reservist Joseph Müller is buried in the war cemetery in Labry (France), Block 1 Grave 70. Labry is in Alsace that was then German, and not too far from Breisgau. So, though it would seem strange that he died in hospital in Germany and was buried in France, he really died in Germany and was buried in Germany.

He has a Gew98 with an S98 quillback bayonet. Instead of the lineman tool he carries an axe with the same harness that JPS posted pics of a while back. An interesting detail, I think, with the leather loop for the bayonet scabbard.
 

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Bayonetcollector
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Norway
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Posted - 10/24/2006 : 5:10:08 PM Now. I haven't posted a WWI image in a long time. Not that I haven't got more, but the Heinrich Faber and Anna/Heinrich Menges series have been great and I feel it is good to consentrate on those. However I thought I just had to post this one... For several reasons.

First of all my former Girlfriend (1988-89) lived in Dresden Neustadt where this was postmarked, so I've been all around Neustadt. I must have been where this hospital once was at some point.

Second, it is a nice image of wounded soldiers with nice uniform details etc...

Third, I thought I'd try my hand on reading it... just to see if I can do it.

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Download Attachment:
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Well. It is not as difficult as most of the ones I've posted, but not nearly as easy as Heinrich Menges handwriting either.
Here goes:

To:
Ch. Hoff (Hopp?)
Vereinlazarett Damschule
Zimer 80
Heilbronn
(Does the - over the M mean a double M so it is Dammschule and Zimmer?)

25/2 1916

Lieber Kamerad.

Haben deinen lieben brief erhalten, und hast mir dadurch grosse freude bereitet. Ich habe mich erkältet und liege von neuem in bett; werde dich später mehr schreiben. Viele herzliche grüsse und eine gute genesung wünscht dich dein freund Romok(?) Altmann.
Reserve Lazarett II
Dresden
(?) 1,B, (?) 24.

Here is a translation, not strictly literal, but it hopefully catches the gist of it.

25th of february 1916

Dear friend.

I have got your dear letter, and by that you've given me great happiness. I have gotten a cold and once again I'm bedridden; I'll write more to you later. Many heartfelt greetings and a good healing for you, is the wish of your friend Romok(?) Altmann.
Reserve hospital II
Dresden
(?) 1,B, (?) 24.


Now, Big Commander and The Expert, please feel free to critizise any error in transcription and translation. This is definitely not perfect and your help in removing the question marks would be greatly appreciated.

It is fun to experiment like this, simply to try to do it myself, but judging from the handwriting in the previous posts I'll not be able to do what we three do together on my own in many years, if indeed ever. So, I'm counting on, and hoping, that our cooperation will go on for a long time.

Any comments are, as always, welcome.




Edited by - Bayonetcollector on 10/24/2006 5:52:39 PM The Expert
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


USA
1417 Posts
Posted - 10/24/2006 : 6:59:18 PM Well, BigCom, I guess this is goodbye between us. BayCol no longer needs us! See ya later, pal!

"Once you were the master and I was the student. I am the master now."
Darth Vader to Obi-wan Kenobi, Star Wars




Excellent translation. I can add nothing to the meaning, as it is all there, but stylistically I might offer a few tweaks:



Christian Hopp
Vereinlazarett Dammschule
Zimmer 80
Heilbronn

25th of february 1916

Dear friend.

I am in receipt of your dear letter, whereby you have given me great joy. I caught a cold, and so am newly bedridden; I will write you more later. Sending you the most heartfelt greatings and wishing you a good convalescence, your friend,
Romock Altmann


Yes, BayCol, the tilde over the m is an abbreviation representing a double letter. German has many of these sorts of abbreviations, as you well know, although this one has fallen into disuse in recent years. At least one of the previous letters had this mark.

Regards.
Edited by - The Expert on 10/24/2006 7:00:17 PMThe Expert
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


USA
1417 Posts
Posted - 10/24/2006 : 7:01:31 PM As far as the picture goes: "Smoke 'em if ya got 'em, boys!!"DocAV
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


Australia
3278 Posts
Posted - 10/24/2006 : 7:35:35 PM Just one interesting point from the Address "Vereinlazarett Dammschule": Union /United Hospital, Ladies School"...Obviously a school cleared of its students for a Recuperation Hospital. As the photo shows all the patients as "Walking" wounded, yet still wearing Hospital issue PJs under their greatcoats...probably they were still restricted to Hospital grounds.

And another feature of the photo: All(or nearly all) the soldiers have a cigarette in hand or in Mouth for the Photo. The style of holding the cigarette is one common throughout Europe at the time
( I have a photo of all my Great-Uncles together, Grandfather and Great-grandfather (Photo 1919, Northern Italy) and all the younger men carry their cigarettes as in the 1916 Dresden Photo.

great work, Guys,
Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics
[/URL]The Expert
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Posted - 10/24/2006 : 7:43:08 PM Thanks, Doc! Glad to see we are a hit Down Under!

A "Damm", FYI, is an embankment, or a dike, or maybe a causeway, depending on the usage. You may recognize the word from the famous street in Berlin, "Kurfuerstendamm"..."Elector's dike". "Damen" would be be women. Hence it is the "school on the embankment"

Regards.
Edited by - The Expert on 10/24/2006 7:45:35 PMThe Expert
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


USA
1417 Posts
Posted - 10/24/2006 : 7:51:41 PM It also occurs to me that the man sitting down on the left bears a striking resemblance to the american actor, Noah Wyle, from the TV show, ER.

Regards.

Edited by - The Expert on 10/24/2006 7:57:11 PMBig commander
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member


Belgium
967 Posts
Posted - 10/25/2006 : 12:50:50 PM You did well Baycol! Good and certainly "surpassing" students are the goal of every real "master". To have learned something is a joy ... to have teached something also! If one doesn't remember anymore where he read it it's always safe to quote Kong Ze (Confucius): "Be gratefull to the one who learned you something". This wisdom was given to me, years ago, by a young student in Suzhou, Mainland China. He wasn't half my age but he was so right.
Concerning the "Dresden Cigarette Club" ("DCC" in short
) it certainly was a time that smoking was something unsuspected and viril. I remember the pipe rack in the parental home with the Flemish inscription: "Het is geen man die niet roken kan!" (Free: Only real man smoke!). It's a very bad habit and I still have it.
PS: Did you notice that the second man from the left (standing row) carries a big stick? I think he wanted to be sure to recuperate the cigarettes he lended for the photo

Ubique fidelis et fortis
(1st recce)
Edited by - Big commander on 10/25/2006 12:59:04 PMBayonetcollector
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


Norway
1471 Posts
Posted - 10/25/2006 : 2:35:47 PM Thanks for those words Big Commander.

The pipe rack... Is the literal translation "He is not a man who can not smoke"? Afraid I'm also a smoker...
The Expert
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


USA
1417 Posts
Posted - 10/25/2006 : 2:38:40 PM I should post a pic of a pipe I'm carving right now after I finish it.

Regards.
Edited by - The Expert on 10/25/2006 3:27:29 PMDocAV
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


Australia
3278 Posts
Posted - 10/26/2006 : 12:46:56 AM Thanks for the Correction on "Dammschule" as against my interpretation (erroneous) of "Ladies School."

So it's the "School on the Levee" or "On the Dike"...an indication of whereabouts it was(is) (may have been)???
A bit like in London "On the Embankment" or in Rome, "LungoTevere".

All info is a hit down under, we are so far from all the action.
Even if there is a large reserve of untapped documentation here from all the Post WW I immigrants from both sides of the Great War...sadly a lot has "just gone to the Dump" when the owners passed on. Occasionally our Historical groups and small museums do get rich collections of letter, cards, photos etc. and some has been deposited at the Australian War Memorial.
But nowhere like the volume of memorabilia coming out of Europe and the USA nowadays.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a group that must be veterans already. Three of the five are decorated. The visible steel scabbard of a 98/05 should indicate 1915 or later (that's when the steel scabbards came into use if I remember correctly). What kind of unit are these from?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Bayonetcollector
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Norway
1471 Posts
Posted - 01/30/2007 : 6:40:30 PM These images showing the front line areas appear to have been sold by the help fund for L.J.R No 124 (Light Jäger regiment? Landsturm? What regiment can this have been?), presumably to help invalids or some such purpose. Whether sold during or post war I can't tell.

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These show the landscape with trenches and fortifications.

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Sadly there is no indication of where this is and what year, only that stamp on the reverse of all three.

Any comments are welcome.
Gustaf B
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member


USA
1022 Posts
Posted - 02/01/2007 : 11:57:42 AM Hey Bayonetcollector,
The L.I.124 served with the 2nd Lanwehr division until 1917 when it was moved to the 26th Landwehr division. The L.I.124 should be from Wurttemberg.
Gus
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Obverse:
Fr.(Fer.?) Müller / (München?) - K. Koduss(Koruss?) (Frankf. ?) - R. Ubrecht (München?)
Weihnachten in Flandern 1916.

Reverse:
Abend d(en) 17 / 1 / 17
Liebe Grützmacher's !
Herzl(ichen) Dank für Euere liebe Sendung diese ist heute in meinen Besitz gelangen(?).
Alles gut bisauf jeden(?) ??angen, hier Schnee & nasskalt. Sonst ohne Mehr.
Obacht auf meine Anschrift geben, bin nach Abt(ei)l(un)g 11 (La Matlein) (Lille) versetzt.
Herzl(ichen) Grüss
Euer Rob(Robert?/Robrecht?) Ubrecht.


Obverse:
Fr.(Fer.?) Müller / (München?) - K. Koduss(Koruss?) (Frankf. ?) - R. Ubrecht (München?)
Christmas in flanders 1916.


Reverse:
Evening on the 17th of january 1917
Dear
(family) Grützmacher!
Heartfelt thanks for your dear shipment, that I managed manged to get into my possession today. Everything is ok
(lacuna here as I do not understand the context of the legible words well enough) , here is snow and wet cold. Further nothing more to say. Pay attention to the adress as I've moved, it is now Abteilung 11 (la Matlein) (Lille).
Heartfelt greetings.
Yours Rob Ubrecht


Both the man on the right and the left are wearing a Drillichjacke. By this time in the war, this jacket was being issued in a gray cotton herringbone weave cloth. The jacket was part of a suit of work clothes (Drillichanzug) that could be worn under or over the wool uniform. The soldier in the center appears to be an infantryman. I can almost read the numbers on his shoulder straps.
 
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