Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, quite the collection!!
Cheesecloth. That's the first I've heard of that. I oiled and covered with RIG for the photos. I will have to try the cheesecloth.
I suspect that it was a bring-back. He also had a GEW 98 dated 1916. I talked him out of that one 20 years ago.
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
If you're talking about Rig spray lubricant/protectant that is fine but I would definitely get to rubbing that rust with some heavier gun oil and the cheesecloth. The cheescloth will actually pick some of that speckling up and into it.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
20,943 Posts
Don't do any heavy "rubbing". You don't need to scrub away any of that fine bluing.

Patience. Take off the grips. Put the metal inside a baggie with a squirt of PB blaster, a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid and a tablespoon of good synthetic motor oil.

Let it sit inside the baggie for a month. Take it out and use a BRASS brush with the oil still on the surface.

Put it back in the baggie for another month. Repeat. Then wipe down lightly with a soft cloth.

There will be no more rust. And you won't lose any bluing.

Patience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Third Variant Mauser Model 1914 -World War I Production
Serial Number 13500 - 290100 approximately
With the advent of World War I, production was quickly ramped up to fill military orders. With over 276,000 made, this is the most common variant of the Model 1914. Pender refers to it as the Wartime Commercial 1914.

Mauser Pistols
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Your 32. caliber Mauser pocket model is the 3rd variation after the Humpbacks and the early production variations. Your was made in 1915 and was accepted by the German Imperial army. I refer to these as "1914 War Era" examples. Yours is the first of 3 sub variations or types. It has a neat serial number, 5 digits is early. As others have addressed the surface rust I will refrain from comment. I hope you are able to remove it without damaging the finish as otherwise it is in very good condition.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
family legend - back in the 1930's when times were different U.S. postal employees were allowed to legally carry weapons with post masters permission - mail robberies common at time - my father kept this one in clerks drawer at Elizabeth post office + carried it when he carried mail bags to tracks for pick up by moving trains -
Brown Product Gun Firearm Trigger
Gun Product Brown Firearm Trigger
Gun Product Brown Firearm Trigger
Gun Firearm Trigger Gun accessory Gun barrel
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
It is a believable legend. Your 32. caliber Mauser pocket model was made in the mid to late 1920s and imported as it is marked "Germany". It was a different time then and these were often purchased to carry for personnel protection, no permit required.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
New Jersey required a permit since early 1900's - federal postal employees were exempt - mother died in 1956 + father in 1966 so it is impossible to verify facts - part of the story is Elizabeth post office had a pistol range in basement + issued .45 revolvers to employees at times + my father also knew Dutch Schultz -
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,977 Posts
Many Postal employees were issued weapons. Mostly when the PO was a government department. My Grandfather was a clerk on an inter urban type rail setup and had an issued Colt snubbie he wore home into the 50s. Local PO had holsters attached to sorting cases through the 60s. I saw an old "HYPO" A bus set up as a rolling Post Office transport that had a '28 Thompson in it's inventory.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top