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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some think loading blocks are evil…I’m not asking for opinions on use, but a way for some to make handy blocks for loading, or just sorting and organizing your brass/ammo.

1) Find 45 ACP ammo trays in the range trash
2) Rough up one edge of each with sandpaper and clean edge with alcohol
3) Glue together with a PLASTIC SPECIFIC epoxy and clamp or rubber band together overnight.
4) Use ‘em or don’t!
Rectangle Wood Font Gas Symmetry
 

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I have been using American Eagle (Federal) white and black .40S&W 50 round trays since the 2000s.
Get them ( then) from local Pistol Range used by LE .
( .40 cal Glocks).
Originally used individually with inside-out sleeves for our Custom Antique/Obsolete Cartridge Cases, and Movie Blanks; then 50 round trays of Rifle Cartridges ( Rimless Mauser & Mannlicher size cases, with custom made packet sleeves;
Then 100 (2×50) trays for Loadingblocks and cartridge counting; and finally 500 ( 10x50) in rows of 5x2) for large lot reforming or Blank Loading and Crimping, or Priming.
The Larger trays are in light wooden frames, the 100s just used thin cardboard folded up around the trays and Polyurethane glues up. Solid as a rock.
Btw, Packet liners are made from CocaCola (r) F-flute
Corrugated Cardboard ( 1mm thick) which makes a strong Cartridge Box ( more so than single ply board used commercially)
Packets for our Commercial Obsolete cases are dimensioned as if they held Loaded Ammo, the Packet continues use after loading ( no need for MTMs)
For Rimmed cases, we pack them mouth-down, with rims overlapping, to fit a 70mmx140mm Tray+ outer sleeve.
I even have crates made to take
500 cartridges per Layer, 4 layers, ( 2,000) for storing primed 5,56 long Blanks, 7,62 Long Blanks, etc.
For short term storage, they are Ideal between lot preparation for up to 10,000 cartridges ( Movie Blanks).
Doc AV
AVBTechServices.
 

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I know some think loading blocks are evil…I’m not asking for opinions on use, but a way for some to make handy blocks for loading, or just sorting and organizing your brass/ammo.

1) Find 45 ACP ammo trays in the range trash
2) Rough up one edge of each with sandpaper and clean edge with alcohol
3) Glue together with a PLASTIC SPECIFIC epoxy and clamp or rubber band together overnight.
4) Use ‘em or don’t!
I never got the memo on evil! Good post.

I paid good money and you got those for free. My one consolation is some of mine needed a bigger hole. I guess using a drill press and scrap wood is kinda free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never got the memo on evil! Good post.
There are those that insist “you must charge a case with powder and INSTANTLY seat a bullet in that case, one by one” as a loading block will yield empty and double charged cases galore.

I didn’t want the thread to dissolve into that back & forth argument
 

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There are those that insist “you must charge a case with powder and INSTANTLY seat a bullet in that case, one by one” as a loading block will yield empty and double charged cases galore.
I always choose a load that will over flow when double charged.
I also eyeball the whole tray before I start seating bullets. ALWAYS

Thank you for the explanation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I always choose a load that will over flow when double charged.
I also eyeball the whole tray before I start seating bullets. ALWAYS

Thank you for the explanation.
Roger that. You see my picture?…I’m eyeballing those 308 Match loads: All same-same and good to go!
 

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Loading blocks or not, reloading is a process, it must be done the same way every time.
As each step of the process is completed the product must be segregated from the uncompleted product.
Such segregation eliminates the possibility of doubling up on any step in the process.
In my case, being right handed, that process is from left to right, charging the cases, for instance, from whatever type container the primed cases are in (bin or loading block or whatever) on the left, to the charging station in the center, to loading block on the right.
Once the block is full, an examination of every case in the block with a bright light shows that all cases are charged with, more or less, the same amount of powder.
Then and only then are those cases moved to the bullet seating step.

It's not the tools you use, it's the process, IMO, mixing uncompleted product and completed product in the same container (of whatever type) is a recipe for problems.
 

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Loading blocks or not, reloading is a process, it must be done the same way every time.
As each step of the process is completed the product must be segregated from the uncompleted product.
Such segregation eliminates the possibility of doubling up on any step in the process.
In my case, being right handed, that process is from left to right, charging the cases, for instance, from whatever type container the primed cases are in (bin or loading block or whatever) on the left, to the charging station in the center, to loading block on the right.
Once the block is full, an examination of every case in the block with a bright light shows that all cases are charged with, more or less, the same amount of powder.
Then and only then are those cases moved to the bullet seating step.

It's not the tools you use, it's the process, IMO, mixing uncompleted product and completed product in the same container (of whatever type) is a recipe for problems.
I would say it depends on the person, as well as so many different things with that "run" you are making.

My process for testing new loads when loading up 5 rounds of a given recipe is very different then when making a run of 100. Same goes with making rounds that run in the 20's, that process is yet again different. And handgun is yet again different from rifle.

There are some things that cross over, what I would call the basic safety stuff, but outside of that things are very different.

I will give you an example, I run on a turret press but run it like a single stage.

For loads on short runs like 5 I will do each round all the way through one at a time. If I am loading 100 rounds, prime all, charge all, seat bullets in all, then into box. Each process is done one at a time, vs the short loads where each round it done start to finish.

Some people need to pick a way and stick with it to stay away from errors.
 

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Agreed, I suspect however, that whatever your process for any given batch size, the process is the same every time.
I have done the same myself, empties and powder filled in the same block, 5 or 10 empties on one end, transfers to the other end when charged.
Notice the separation still occurs.
Now, using a progressive press to complete one round at a time would obviously require a different process than mine but it is probably highly repeatable.
Point being that your tools don't define your process, other than defining what they are capable of, the operators brain is still the most important "tool" in any process.
 

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Agreed, I suspect however, that whatever your process for any given batch size, the process is the same every time.
I have done the same myself, empties and powder filled in the same block, 5 or 10 empties on one end, transfers to the other end when charged.
Notice the separation still occurs.
Now, using a progressive press to complete one round at a time would obviously require a different process than mine but it is probably highly repeatable.
Point being that your tools don't define your process, other than defining what they are capable of, the operators brain is still the most important "tool" in any process.
Correct it is....now. But at the start, like most people we did it the way "the manual said" or the guy teaching you told you how to do it. As we do it more and more we come upon an idea....well what if I did this for that. And we find out something that works better for us.

Now some of us are not having a little card on the table and weighing each bullet in the box, some of us may just do a load and call it good, well the manual says X,Y,Z is it so that is it. Others like to tinker, I think it comes down to the person.
 
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