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Diamond Bullet Member and the Revered Sir Jim
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D-Day Certificates

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Veterans Affairs Anthony J. Principi and H.E. Francois de l'Estang, ambassador of France, announced that the French Government will present certificates to World War II veterans to thank them for their participation in the liberation of France.

This honor is further evidence that the contributions of our World War II veterans will be remembered by this nation and by our allies around the world whom they helped to free, said Principi.

To be eligible, a veteran must have served on French territory, in French territorial waters or in French airspace between June 6, 1944 and May 8, 1945. The certificate will not be issued posthumously. Presentation of the certificates is expected to begin later this year.

The ten Consuls of France in the United States will work with state veterans affairs offices, veterans service organizations and other veterans groups to identify eligible people and to organize ceremonies to present the certificates.

The application form is available from veteran service organizations and on a special Internet site maintained by the French
 

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No credit for the guys doing recon of France BEFORE 6 June 1944 and no posthumous awards, while we lose 1,000 veterans daily.

Keep your pieces of paper, France. Let your next invader use them as occupation money.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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My feelings toward the French were, essentially, neutral. Until i got to Germany in September, 1966 and quickly became involved in Operation FRELOC. My experiences during that convinced me that (a) we should NOT have liberated the French from the Nazis and (b) requiring the Nazis to continue to occuppy and administer France after May 8, 1945 would have been an entirely suitable punishment for their evil actions toward others during the conflict...
 

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My feelings toward the French were, essentially, neutral. Until i got to Germany in Septemeber, 1966 and quickly became involved in Operation FRELOC. My experiences during that convinced me that (a) we should NOT have liberated the French from the Nazis and (b) requiring the Nazis to continue to occuppy and administer France after May 8, 1945 would have been an entirely suitable punishment for their evil actions toward others during the conflict...
Please elaborate Clyde. I'm curious why you feel the way you do and want to know why.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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The way the French I encountered at that time acted toward their NATO allies is the basis. Supercilious, obstructive, and - well, I was left with the feeling they didn't like us much and still expected us (Germany, USA) to buffer them from the Russians, and that we ought to thank them for the opportunity.
 

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The way the French I encountered at that time acted toward their NATO allies is the basis. Supercilious, obstuctive, and - well, I wa left with the feeling they didn't like us much and still expected us (Germany, USA) to buffer them from the Russians, and that we ought to thank them for the opportunity.
I figured it was something along those lines.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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Clyde, you are probably right. Thats why we joked that one battery of our Nike Herc Btln had to protect our rear flank.
Wolf
Are you sure you were really joking?

I recall one of the other folks I served with suggesting that if was true that if you give a German a gun and a drum, he heads for the French border = we should buy a lot of drums, as it seemed there were plenty of guns already in the hands of the Bundeswehr.

Steve was ALMOST as fond of the French as I was....
 

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French People Honor Pilots

My great uncle died in a bombing raid in which his plane crashed at a small town/village in France. They have held honors for the sacrifice of these specific fliers (my great uncle) who died in this plane every 10 years or so. My great aunt who is about 90 now, was the youngest of her siblings. There was an invite last year for her to make an appearance at the local church for one of the commemorative ceremonies. She has visited the town in the past and stayed with locals who invited her there to honor her loss and the sacrifice of her brother. She sent me some of the local articles from the local newspaper so I could translate them to English with software.

I feel that the French people, especially those from the time and their kids do honor the sacrifice of our WWII heroes, even if the government didn't do anything official.
 

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I Know France pretty well, only thing i can say about the theme is that, from my experience, french common people do have the sacrifice of so many young US soldiers, in there hearts, and they in fact honor that memory. Of course official policies, are a bit different, nevertheless, I think the french people do have a gratitude debt towards those heros. But also bare in mind that France changed a lot in the last 40 years, speaking in terms of demography, there are places today in France where among the locals you only find 30% of really french origin, all the others are french naturalized. To give you an example, do you Know what is the biggest portuguese city? Paris. There are over 1 and half milion portuguese livin in Paris, making it the biggest portuguese town, its a joke of course, but serves to ilustrate my point, which is, people tend to have short memory, and it gets worse if they do not relate to events. It must be political officials to ensure that those memories do not die.
best regards
 
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