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A very generous German collector friend has forwarded to me (via another very generous collector) a German document he discovered outlining an inventory of Russian weapons in February 1945. Interestingly, it includes a column entitled "An das Ausland verkauft", sold to foreign countries. I have little doubt that all of these went to Finland in late 1944.

Gewehr 252(r) - M91: 8324
Gewehr 253(r) - M91 Dragoon: 1966
Gewehr 254(r) - M91/30: 52142

Selbstladegewehr 258(r) - SVT38: 70
Selbstladegewehr 259(r) - SVT40: 379

Karabiner 453(r) - M1910: 150
Karabiner 454(r) - M1938: 325

Le.M.G. 120(r) - DP27: 700
Kpfw M.G. 320(r) - DT: 600

No bayonets were sold, nor were any pistols, snipers, or SMGs. And yes, I realize the M1910 designation is incorrect, but that is what the Germans used.

As an interesting aside, there are no SlG.260(r), SVT40 snipers, or Kb.457(r), M1944, listed in the German inventory.
 

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Good stuff thanks for sharing Ryan.
 

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Interesting as some reputable source (I forget the citation) said Finland imported 57,000 in July 1944. The number of M91/9130s is not far off that...
The exact number was 56,722 rifles. All that is known is that they were Mosin-Nagants - mostly m/91-30, but also older rifle among them.

Soviet-made semiauto rifles and light machineguns went somewhere else since Finland never bought any from Germany.

Jarkko
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The exact number was 56,722 rifles. All that is known is that they were Mosin-Nagants - mostly m/91-30, but also older rifle among them.

Soviet-made semiauto rifles and light machineguns went somewhere else since Finland never bought any from Germany.

Jarkko
Who, aside from Finland and the USSR, would have any use for 7.62x54R weapons? None that I can think of.
 

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Thank you for posting this. Interesting how meticulous the Germans were. You'd think they would have just said "Mosin Nagant's" and been done with it, but they labeled each as it was.
 

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Typo: February 1944 not 1945, since Finland sued for peace with the USSR in September 1944. Arms deliveries from Germany would have had to come before then, likely May June 1944 not "in late 1944." [EDIT: Not so, apparently! See below for Sept. '44 delivery].

The Germans had codes for all captured weapons, including Russian and Soviet models.
 

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Typo: February 1944 not 1945, since Finland sued for peace with the USSR in September 1944. Arms deliveries from Germany would have had to come before then, likely May June 1944 not "in late 1944."

The Germans had codes for all captured weapons, including Russian and Soviet models.
It's likely that the document merely memorialized the event ex post facto. By that late in the war, the Germans had been ushered out of Finland by the Finns, despite being co-belligerants and enjoying a type of 'Waffenbruderschaft' in fighting the Sovs together.

Speaking of the experience in being 'brothers in arms,' here's a pic of an acidly worded sign left in the wake of the German withdrawal from Finland to Norway following Finnish agreement to the terms of the cease fire with the USSR:


Pat
 

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as a thanks for nothing weapons brotherhood?

Probably translates more clearly to "thanks for nothing brothers in arms" (my speculation)
The latter, I think. They had fought together for years and had exchanged TTPs and friendship, and had parted on bad terms. That's a summary, but it covers it.
Pat
 

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The latter. They had fought together for years and had exchanged TTPs and friendship, and had parted on bad terms. That's a summary, but it covers it.
Pat
Thanks Pat. I'd never seen that photo. I sent the link to a German friend of mine for the exact translation as he is a history buff too. Should make for an interesting discussion.
 

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Thanks Pat. I'd never seen that photo. I sent the link to a German friend of mine for the exact translation as he is a history buff too. Should make for an interesting discussion.
The book 'Black Edelweiss' has some interesting anecdotes about the cross-polination of tactics between the Finnish Army and their 6th SS comrades, and even mentions the adoption of things like Puuko knives, et al.
Pat
 

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Document is very clearly dated February 1945.
Fair enough. As indicated, the "Lapland War" was on while the German bureaucrat typed it up with three months left in the war. The arms transfers would not have been in "late 1944" in any case. [I stand corrected. See early September dates on Jarkko's posts...]

The German sign says: "Thanks for nothing 'brothers in arms'" /s.
 

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It's likely that the document merely memorialized the event ex post facto. By that late in the war, the Germans had been ushered out of Finland by the Finns, despite being co-belligerants and enjoying a type of 'Waffenbruderschaft' in fighting the Sovs together.

Speaking of the experience in being 'brothers in arms,' here's a pic of an acidly worded sign left in the wake of the German withdrawal from Finland to Norway following Finnish agreement to the terms of the cease fire with the USSR:


Pat
Hey; you gotta do what you gotta do. By SEP `44, the writing was pretty clearly on the wall. If dip Hitler hadn't have made major strategic blunders, things would of been different.
 
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