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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My first British Martini Henry (i do own a nice Gehendra), interested in what you all think as I am no expert on these rifles but the price seemed right 375, but also interested in what you think it might be worth. Sorry about quality of pictures will take some better ones asap, but just received rifle and would like some initial feedback. Rifle is just as i un boxed it, I purchased it as being a commercial L.S.A.co 1877 MK2 rifle which from my limited knowledge it pretty much what I hope I have ? I can find no Nepalese or other foreign service marks on it and the only broad arrow is on the cocking indicator. No cracks in the stock bore is dark but looks as it will clean up nice. Much of its original finish to the metal work action is strong and positive. Also noticed if you look at side of barrel under rear sight there are some small dimples anyone know what these are and screw on the right hand side of the action under the number 209 see pictures ?
Thanks for your help

More pics follow link

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157623609626403/
 

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I'll take your word on the year and maker, since the pics aren't that clear. However it certainly appears to be a commercially produced volunteer rifle in the MK II style. I say MK II style because if it isn't Brit issued, it isn't a Mark anything, since that was an official designation applied to issued arms. Since it is a voluteer rifle, you wouldn't expect to find foreign markings. These were privately owned and maintained and by definition don't have any governmental markings. As such they are also generally found in better cosmetic condition than most issued rifles.

Based on current prices realized (vice asked), there doesn't appear to be that much interest in plain volunteer rifles without some documented history. LSA is of course one of the less common manufacturers which may influence value some. Many of these are acquired to be used as regular shooters and as such bore condition matters a great deal in valuation. Once upon a time before the Nepal cache showed up folks were more forgiving on bore condition, since many showed some neglect from use of BP without proper cleaning. However since many if not most of the Nepal MH rifles have VG bores without pitting, expectations for bore condition have gone up.

I shy away these days from guessing on value. Suffice it to say that volunteer rifles bring significantly less than Brit issued ones in comparable condition unless they have some documented history.
 

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I also would like to see clearer pictures especially of the markings...Who ever electro pencil 209 on that action should be horse whipped!

Right above the point of the indicator is some sort of mark. Can't tell if it is the LSA trade mark or perhaps and old Canada property mark. I do see the Stylized M trademarkl indicating of the Martini licensed use.

I like the commercial rifles better as the usually are av little better quality.

I have to say this I have not seen this configuration of markings before. The Martini license marking is usually on the left side and commercial rifles aren't normally dated.

Except for the Electro pencil mark, it's a nice looking rifle by the way.
 
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