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Does anyone know of a book which shows colored pictures of the different woods used on the various firearms? Everyone talks about different walnuts and birch and other woods, but I have a hard time distinguishing the different woods in my collection. Random pictures don't really help at all. Thanks for any help.
 

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Color will not help you. You have to go by the grain of the wood most of the time because of the stain used. I remember stripping a savage 99E and it was miserable. The wood was coated with some kind of epoxy and fake grain stained into it--from the factory. The original wood was straight grained like birch. There are a lot of woodworking/sawmill sites online. Try You Tube.
 

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As a serious woodworking enthusiast, most rifle stocks are a dense hardwood that isn't to heavy, has good workability, nice grain pattern, and is readily available in the area. Walnut varieties top the list, with Ash, Birch, Beech, Maple varieties, Myrtle, and even Mahogany being used. Of course war period arms that were mass produced took what they could get, and quality suffered as a result. This prompted the advent of laminated stocks which could use inferior grades of wood to produce strong light warp resistant stocks.
Without removing the finish or finding a place where bare wood is present, it will be hard to tell what species of wood you have. The frontiersman often used Curly Maple which grew locally and abundantly. If you seriously are curious about wood varieties beyond just your gunstocks, then Rocker sells a 50 piece wood identification kit on their website.
 
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