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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Review of actual rifle:
Light, handy, very slim; trimmer than either the Henry or an old Chipmunk I found. This thing is very well-proportioned. It's not an adult rifle trimmed down.
Sights are a rather large-diameter sheet-metal peep with sloppy screw-adjustable windage and elevation. The front sight is a cheap-looking plastic ramp topped by a square blade.
The scope mount is specific to the Crickett and must be ordered separately for $12.95. It works quite well with a Tasco red-dot sight.
Some parts are plastic and very cheap-looking; for that matter, the clerk at Gander Mountain informed me that one of the Cricketts was dropped by a kid on the floor, and the plastic stock actually broke. I don't know if that meant the stock itself, or the buttplate, which is a separate piece of plastic.

The action is your basic open-the-bolt-slide-in-a-round cocking piece type action. The cocking piece is also cheap-looking plastic, and quite stiff; it takes a lot of effort to cock this rifle, and my daughter can't do it. I consider this a positive, by the way.
Accuracy seems to be adequate, seems to be 2-3" at 25 yards with $10 brick ammo.

The trigger pull is somewhat heavy and coarse. I don't have a problem with it, but my daughter is just learning and has some trouble with yanking on the trigger as the pull weight is a bit much for a little kid's finger. I haven't yet looked to see if there is something I might want to do about that, or just leave it as a safety issue.

For example, I sighted in her Crickett and then went back to my Winchester 75, and had inadvertant discharges because I couldn't 'feel' the trigger pull (Inhale, exhale halfway, hold it, concentrate, take up-POW! Whoa! What was that?).
Some ejection failures with Shorts; they would extract fine but not eject, leaving the case sitting in the action. This did not happen with Long Rifles. No failures to fire or feed.

All in all, it's OK for a beginner rifle for popping cans at the plinking range. The price was right, $107 out the door. It's PINK, dammit, and the kid loves it. It's not really a family heirloom piece, but personally, I have absolutely no patience whatsoever with macho gun crap, no patience whatsoever with arthritic traditionalists who attack anything not made of walnut and blued steel, and wanted a rifle that would get my kid enthused about shooting.
The Crickett fills the bill nicely.

One drawback I discovered; she is so proud of the thing she tells EVERYONE about her 'pink rifle'. And I mean strangers at the grocery store. I've discovered that a lot of people who are otherwise essentially pro-gun are freaked out by a six year old with a real firearm, and all the explaining I do (only used under Pentagon-like supervision) doesn't seem to matter. Oh well.
 

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Thanks and don't worry about those people! I am teaching my daughter to shoot this summer after she turns 10 because she is just now matured enough to start. Every child is different I was in the woods killing squirrels at age 7.

I getting a old marlin bolt and cutting it down for my daughter.
 

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got one with two stocks special order adult size and young kid too for them to grow into....and you could change the color later on......
.....shot good......hate the lock it causes the action to rock a little on the adult stock, i'll fit it later this year...
 

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I bought a walnut stocked Cricket close to 10 years ago when a store was closing. The grandkids weren't near big enough, but the price was right and it is "kid sized", so I bought it and it sat in the box for a few years. I installed an old Bushnell .22 scope when I turned it over to the grandkids. I figured using a scope let them concentrate on trigger control and breath control. They can learn to use open sights, later. It is definitely not a match grade weapon, but I believe I got more like 1.5" groups at 25 yards, although it's hard to bench for a 5"11" 260 pound guy. Sometimes it does fail to eject and the scope mount and small ejection port makes it more difficult to get the empty out. Also, the bolt is somewhat difficult to remove. It drags as it is withdrawn. Unlike USMCsean's piece the cocking piece on this one is steel, I think. However, the rifle is in Illinois and I'm in Kansas, so I can't check. All in all, it's a great started gun, especially for small statured kids.
 
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