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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all
I'm currently having feeding issues with my M/28. When loading a round into the magazine, and attempting to chamber it.
The round seems to stop moving when the tip of the bullet hits the chamber. attached are images showing my issue.
My thinking is that the rounds arent sitting high enough, or possible the ejector/top round holder are pushing it down?
I've tried with live rounds at the range today, and hade the same isue.

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Don't mind the crud in the chamber, i cleaned it out and still am having the issues.
 

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I would take it apart, completely out of the stock, and clean everything. It looks like it still has cosmoline in it. That is the first thing I do when a rifle comes in the house. I clean it like my Drill Sargent is watching. Lol
 

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My thinking is that the rounds arent sitting high enough, or possible the ejector/top round holder are pushing it down?
According to 1927 Ministry of Defence of Finland's Mosin Nagant m/91 repair guide, the problem is most likely caused either by "teeth" of the follower assembly protruding too much or dented magazine wall. Less likely cause is failure of one of the springs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both, im going to do a deep dive today and try to find something. Mangrove i find it really really cool that you have Finnish documents about this issue, Im going to take a look at the assembly and see if anything is odd.
 

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Thank you both, im going to do a deep dive today and try to find something. Mangrove i find it really really cool that you have Finnish documents about this issue, Im going to take a look at the assembly and see if anything is odd.
9x out of 10 your "interrupter" is dirty and just needs removal and cleaning. Of course your going to have to take the barreled action out of the stock. Good time to clean it up like it should of been already and already mentioned. When the interupter is so filthy it can't function properly it will "lock up" and not feed. Then take lots of pictures and share that M28 if you haven't already. Regards, John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks John, i was thinking it might be the interrupter as well, i read that sometimes loosening the screw a little bit might actually solve the issue. Im going to remove it and clean it good. I will take pictures of the Whole rifle after, sometime around noon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, i cleaned her out, tried loosening the screw on the interrupter. i noticed a few things though:
1. If i slam the bolt, it closes, but its less than ideal, and i would assume a round would get damaged from it possibly.
2. I tried doing slow bolt movements and observing the round, and noticed that right when the tip hits the chamber bottom, i push down on the rear of the cartridge, it does go in.
3. the follower is leaning to the right a little bit attached is a picture of that.
Still not sure what it could be almost makes me wonder if receiver is out of spec.
 

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3. the follower is leaning to the right a little bit attached is a picture of that.
From 1927 Ministry of Defence of Finland's Mosin Nagant m/91 repair guide. Loose translation by me from Finnish original:

"5. The follower does not move enough to the left when the bolt is closed.

Problem:
1) The follower's "tooth" or front end rests on the cut made in the stock.
2) The eccentric part of the bolt is significantly worn.
3) The top of the follower (which rests on the eccentric part of the bolt frame) is considerably worn.
4) The right wall of the magazine is bent inwards.
5) The bolt frame is so worn that the eccentric part of the bolt frame does not move the adjuster to the left.

Effect: Slows down shooting.

Repair:
1) The cut in the stock is widened.
2) The bolt frame is replaced.
3) The follower is replaced.
4) The wall is straightened.
5) Unless the fault can be rectified by replacing the bolt frame or the follower, the rifle must be sent to the gun factory."
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting, i might have found the culprit though, and it is the upper follower spring. Its cracked, and i need to replace it any ideas where?
 

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So did you remove and thoroughly clean the interrupter and the space it sits and operates in? If you have another MN rifle switch magazine assembly whole and see if that changes anything? The way the interrupter works is the top round sits independently of the rounds in the magazine which eliminates the "rim lock" syndrome. While most of us see the MN rifle as infantry proof tough as nails rifle, this is where most problems occur. You may be tempted to look at it, see it moves freely and no grit and leave in search of bigger and better problems. I had a M39 which did the same thing. I had been told but I had to go back and take it apart, remove it, clean what didn't look like needing cleaning and it worked flawlessly after that. Shooting rapid fire in a timed even made this a intolerable situation. I never heard that loosening the interrupter screw would help anything? The only thing I can see that doing is making things worse? Please explain that idea? Not trying to be snarky just wondering the rationale for such an attempt to repair. Maybe I can learn a new trick I never heard of? Regards, John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So did you remove and thoroughly clean the interrupter and the space it sits and operates in? If you have another MN rifle switch magazine assembly whole and see if that changes anything? The way the interrupter works is the top round sits independently of the rounds in the magazine which eliminates the "rim lock" syndrome. While most of us see the MN rifle as infantry proof tough as nails rifle, this is where most problems occur. You may be tempted to look at it, see it moves freely and no grit and leave in search of bigger and better problems. I had a M39 which did the same thing. I had been told but I had to go back and take it apart, remove it, clean what didn't look like needing cleaning and it worked flawlessly after that. Shooting rapid fire in a timed even made this a intolerable situation. I never heard that loosening the interrupter screw would help anything? The only thing I can see that doing is making things worse? Please explain that idea? Not trying to be snarky just wondering the rationale for such an attempt to repair. Maybe I can learn a new trick I never heard of? Regards, John.
Hi John, I read on a different forum that loosening the interrupter screw could help, I just tried it out of lack of different ideas. I'm awaiting a new magazine assembly on Monday, so I can see if that helps. I cleaned the interrupter pretty thoroughly, but I will go back in on Monday and take another look. Who knows maybe the new magazine assembly will solve my issue entirely. What i noticed is that the top round sits wobbly above the interrupter, but currently i cannot test as the upper magazine spring is broken.
 

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The round sitting wobbly is a good thing. Changing the magazine spring won’t have any effect as it’s not pushing on the top round anyway. Unless it’s the last round in the magazine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So, I got the new magazine parts, which didnt fix the issue,
but i did somewhat fix it and found the culprit. The stock!
I removed the stock and screwed the magazine to the receiver without the stock and it fed fine. Put stock back on and boom jam. I removed the rear shim to see if it has something to do with the gap between the mag and receiver, and it looks like it helped a little bit.
 
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