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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently picked up a 1944 Finn 91/30 with a tikka barrel after reading Tuntematon Sotilas and seeing a deal locally I couldn't pass up. It's my first mosin (really should've bought a couple russians back in 2010, and M39's in 2015!!) and I'm trying to educate myself as much as I can about it. Some of the questions I've had come up that my research isn't yielding answers for are below; I'd appreciate any information you guys have and appreciate any help. Thanks!

1. This model has round fingers in the splicing, which I understand to be war time. The rifle, however, is in excellent condition. Does the "war time" stock splicing hold for this model of rifle, or is it just a post war refurb?
2. The receiver is an Izhevsk 1938 round receiver. I know finland acquired their mosins from all over but with a 1938 mfg date is there any other place this rifle could have come from other than a battlefield capture in the winter war or continuation war?
3. Does anyone have production numbers on these rifles? I can only find estimates in terms of captured 91/30's but not reworked M30's.
4. Is there some kind of survey of serial numbers? I believe mine to be early 1944 with a serial number of 57xxx, but would like to compare this to more than just a couple of observed 1943 serial numbers from online auctions.
5. Finally, I'm wanting to preserve the condition but still shoot surplus out of it. Do I really only need to water down the bore and bolt face? In my head I think that working the bolt would spread the salts along the action.
 

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From what I see the Finns made around 20,000 1944 Tikka M30's. From serial number 53900 to 73600.

If you shoot corrosive ammo just clean your bore with Hoppes when you get home. That's what have always done with no damage to my rifles. I do not understand why some people talk about pouring water down your barrel.
 

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Coues: A great many of the Tikka 91/30 barrels were only assembled into rifles after the war which explains their virtually new appearance. My two (one round, one hex) are both apparently unused and I have little doubt they were built post-war even though the fingers of the stock splice are round. As far as clean-up post corrosive ammo, I would personally never consider not using hot water as stage one. With a proper system it ends up adding very little time to cleanup, particularly with these smooth, shiny bores typical of the Tikka 91/30's. With a bolt action the corrosive salts don't really get back into the action, unlike an SVT which unlocks with a fair bit of gas pressure still in the chamber. I do generally wipe the bolt-head with hot water but that's about it.

Ruprecht
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did have one more question. I seem to remember there's often discussion about bore diameter of the m39 being .308 or .311. Does anyone know if this is the case for the tikka 91/30 barrels? I'd like to reload and have plenty of .308 but no .311.
 

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A 1938 dated receiver would have to be a battlefield capture since Finland had no other source for Mosin receivers dated that late. It is most likely a Finnish battlefield capture but could also be a German battlefield capture since Germany sold 57,000 captured Mosin's to Finland in 1944.
Flushing the bore and bolt with water is all I've ever done after shooting corrosive ammo and I've never had any issues. Both the M39 and the M30 can use surplus ammo without issue as neither have a.308 bore.
 

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I actually saw one of those Finnish mosins about a year ago, but it was in really rough condition. Really bad pitting, the action felt rough, and the price was 450$. I would’ve bought it at around 250$, but not that much. Really cool purchase nonetheless and a super piece of history! Gotta show us when you shoot it!
 

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A 1938 dated receiver would have to be a battlefield capture since Finland had no other source for Mosin receivers dated that late. It is most likely a Finnish battlefield capture but could also be a German battlefield capture since Germany sold 57,000 captured Mosin's to Finland in 1944.
Flushing the bore and bolt with water is all I've ever done after shooting corrosive ammo and I've never had any issues. Both the M39 and the M30 can use surplus ammo without issue as neither have a.308 bore.
did the germans mark or ad a stamp to those mosins that were sold to finland?
 

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did the germans mark or ad a stamp to those mosins that were sold to finland?
Most foreign weapons captured and used by the Germans were never marked in any way but weapons that required repair at a German Army depots( Heereszeugämter)..(HZa) were marked on the underside of stock, usually behind the trigger guard. Some SA marked Mosin's have been found with the Kru1 Stamp from the HZa in Krakau Poland on the stock but since most of the rifles in this shipment were in poor condition they were mostly parted out by the Finn's and few intact examples exist. Here is what the Kru1 stamp looks like.
3804563
 

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Congratulations on your first Mosin. A Finnish M/30 is a good place to start. The production numbers JohnnySako pointed out are in the informational sticky section:

Pictures would be great!

The purpose of any “corrosive ammo” cleaning routine is to dissolve potassium chloride (KCl) residue resulting from detonation of the potassium chlorate compound in the primer. The KCl can attract water from the air in moderately humid conditions, which facilitates corrosion of metallic iron via reaction with oxygen.

There are many variations on the water, water-displacing solvent, oil procedure but I follow the routine below:

(optional, depending on how much you’ve shot) Run a bronze brush through the bore to loosen up carbonaceous powder residue mixed with the small amount of potassium chloride primer residue that is the offending water-attracting salt.
  1. Use a spray bottle containing water with a few drops of laundry detergent (the detergent is a wetting agent, aka surfactant, to break the surface tension of water and ensure good interaction of the salt-dissolving water with all surfaces). Hold the rifle pointing down at an angle and spray water into the chamber. I rotate the rifle to ensure that all surfaces get contacted by water. Avoid getting water under the wood or you’ll be disassembling the rifle to dry off the outside of the barreled-receiver. Dry patches. Disassemble the bolt and treat the bolt head the same way as the bore. Wipe the firing pin tip with water, WD-40, oil.
  2. Spray the chamber and bore with WD-40 to help displace any water. Dry patches. I also use cotton swabs to get into the extractor recess at the water and WD-40 stages.
  3. Continue with a normal cleaning routine as necessary, if it’s still dirty (Hoppes 9, CLP, or your choice). I finish by running an oily patch through the bore with whatever petroleum or synthetic oil you prefer.
  4. Run a dry patch through the bore before a range trip.
It’s not nearly as time consuming as it sounds. The spray bottle and WD-40 I just leave in my range bucket. If I can do those two steps at the range while the barrel is still warm, all the better!
 

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great procedure. i used a spay bottle with water and a few drops of murphys oil soap. flushed out the barrel and fired black powder cases. just a quick and dirty method to hold until they are brought home for a more detailed cleaning. i always thought the murphys left a protective film on the parts until removed later. best regards
 

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great procedure. i used a spay bottle with water and a few drops of murphys oil soap. flushed out the barrel and fired black powder cases. just a quick and dirty method to hold until they are brought home for a more detailed cleaning. i always thought the murphys left a protective film on the parts until removed later. best regards
That'll work. Like any substitute for step 1, the key ingredient is the water ;) Murphy's Oil Soap is a detergent (soap) mixture. The "Oil" in the name comes from tall oil (pine tree extractives), whence the water soluble sodium tallate (a mixed component detergent) is obtained, so there isn't actually any lubricating oil in the product.
 

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That'll work. Like any substitute for step 1, the key ingredient is the water ;) Murphy's Oil Soap is a detergent (soap) mixture. The "Oil" in the name comes from tall oil (pine tree extractives), whence the water soluble sodium tallate (a mixed component detergent) is obtained, so there isn't actually any lubricating oil in the product.
agreed. the corrosive effects will destroy those thin walled martini/henry 577/450 cases as well as my 45/70 brass. best regards
 
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