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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some of you around here are big fans of this oil, but I had put off trying it for too long.

Tried some today and I must say I was impressed. Smell wasn't objectionable like I had heard it might be- the missus even gave it a thumbs up- and most surprisingly I found when I was done my hands weren't greasy and smelly like usual with Breakfree/CLP.

Good stuff.
 

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Guys - IMO its great stuff and I wouldn't use anything else on metal after cleaning or stocks. You will notice that it will laquer up quickly on metal cleaning rods after a few uses. The consensus among many collector friends is that this is likely the foundation of what you see on period original stocks with a laquer looking finish.

Scott
 

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It's cheap. CLP has toxic properties, Ballistol doesnt. I buy it in the 16 oz. metal containers from Brownells for like $7 and put it in a plastic spray bottle. It's not the "BEST" and isn't a miracle elixir, but it works for everything I use it for and is non-toxic. It also breaks up bore fouling pretty good. It isn't as detrimental to wood or leather as other things, and while it is recommended for those things I'd put it on neither on purpose. MSDS on it:
http://www.firehawktech.com/Ballistol/MSDS.pdf

Ingredients
(according to a specification from December 2002)

pharmaceutical white oil: CAS RN 8042-47-5
Oleic acid: CAS RN 112-80-1
C-5 alcohols: CAS RN 78-83-1; CAS RN 137-32-6; CAS RN 100-51-6
different essential oils to perfume Ballistol
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I called Ballistol and they were able to tell me a couple of Mom and Pop stores in my area that carried it. Saved me the shipping charges and it felt good to support a small local business. The closest place ended up being a hole in the wall gun store that was just getting started. I had never been there before so that was gravy. Bought a brick of .22s while I was there.

I was impressed the guy I spoke to at Ballistol-Doug-was able to tell me the places near me that carried it, and even went to his rolodex and got a phone number for me to call to put me in touch with the gun store.

Seems like a lot of guys order theirs from Brownell's like Ham does or Midway, etc. online.
 

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Ballistol is wonderful stuff, Ive used it for years now. I just wish somewhere carried it local to here too, I have to order it in every time. Good stuff though, and I shoot a lot of corrosive ammo. It works well for that, hot soapy water and Ballistol appear to kill all of it, completely, and leaves a good oily film after. I do it like the manual says though from WWI: Clean one day, then follow with patches with oil every day for a few days after, too. (They did 10 days back then!)
 

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I've used Ballistol for 10+ years. I always have a big can of it around. It works well on your leather slings as well as the other uses stated above...
 

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Glad to hear many have had the same great experieice with Ballistol. As far as I am concerned using a product the Germans used during the period seems not only logical but appropriate especially on stocks. Never been a great fan of Howards Feed n Wax or other such products that in my experience produce colors, tones and gloss that do not look period.

Scott
 

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Anyone ever use it on a Norwegian blond stock ? If so, any negatives ?
 

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The only colors, tone, or gloss produced by a light Howard's wipe is what the stock looks like with the dirt, grease, dust, and gunk accumulated over 65 years, invariably from improper storage and handling. Bubba's dirt and grime from the 1970s is not original. Ballistol is good stuff. I use large amounts of it on everything because I'm a shooter. Every time I make a Brownells order I put in a 16oz can and always keep a spare because I go through it. Familiar with what it does and doesn't do over a range of applications.

Many of those black, smooth, almost slimy leather K98k slings and black stocks impregnated with everything they touch are that way because of Ballistol (or similar) applications. I would not take a nice leather sling and ruin it with Ballistol because that is what German troops in the field did, nor would I Ballistol a stock to darken it, cause it to attrack dirt and grime, because that is what German troops in the field did. The less you do to such things the better, and Ballistol is not good for preservation of stocks or slings unless you're out in the rain with your K98k fighting, want it quickly waterproofed, and will get a new one in a couple years anyway, if you live that long.

If you want to reenact, eat period German food, live in a field under a zeltbahn tent with your K98k dressed in a German wool uniform, and have the whole experience, wipe the stock and sling with Ballistol. If you have a collector grade weapon and sling, don't. Just my humble opinions from being familiar with the product for many years.
 

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Anyone ever use it on a Norwegian blond stock ? If so, any negatives ?
No - but I have used it on stocks stripped of all sorts of post war goop. It changes color slightly but then so does every solvent cleaner or wax that I know of. It absorbs and wipes off easily. It dries hard and is not too glossy or smell like a beehive. I would not use it on leather. Even if you did so sparingly - it would still not be as harmful as most of the leather treatments out there as Ballistol is pretty organic.

Scott
 

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It will goop up and jellify a bit and attract most things it touches, like dirt and dust. It's a firearm lube and bore cleaner that is not as harsh on slings and stocks as other things like CLP and Hoppes that have more active chemical components. Because it isn't as harsh doesn't mean you should ;)

If German troops did wipe their stocks with it, and they assuredly did, it wasn't for the reasons we do. It was an oil to wipe crusted dirt and seal against water intrusion in the field because that is all they had. They also ate dead horses, didn't shave or brush their teeth or change clothes for weeks, sometimes months, and wrapped their feet in foot wraps, not socks.
 

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The only colors, tone, or gloss produced by a light Howard's wipe is what the stock looks like with the dirt, grease, dust, and gunk accumulated over 65 years, invariably from improper storage and handling. Bubba's dirt and grime from the 1970s is not original. Ballistol is good stuff. I use large amounts of it on everything because I'm a shooter. Every time I make a Brownells order I put in a 16oz can and always keep a spare because I go through it. Familiar with what it does and doesn't do over a range of applications.

Many of those black, smooth, almost slimy leather K98k slings and black stocks impregnated with everything they touch are that way because of Ballistol (or similar) applications. I would not take a nice leather sling and ruin it with Ballistol because that is what German troops in the field did, nor would I Ballistol a stock to darken it, cause it to attrack dirt and grime, because that is what German troops in the field did. The less you do to such things the better, and Ballistol is not good for preservation of stocks or slings unless you're out in the rain with your K98k fighting, want it quickly waterproofed, and will get a new one in a couple years anyway, if you live that long.

If you want to reenact, eat period German food, live in a field under a zeltbahn tent with your K98k dressed in a German wool uniform, and have the whole experience, wipe the stock and sling with Ballistol. If you have a collector grade weapon and sling, don't. Just my humble opinions from being familiar with the product for many years.
Well, according to you, I've desecrated my slings. My problem is all of my items are in my basement, in a small room. My dehumidifier runs constantly to stay ahead of the moisture. This time of the year in E. Tn, humidity starts really getting tough. It's a fine line between having mildew show up or drying stuff out to the point of taking all the moisture from leather and stocks. That's where the Ballistol comes in....helps in both areas. Some of the old slings and ammo pouches probably had guys pissing on 'em as far as I know, yet they are still around and yes, they have a light coat of Ballistol on them. If you know of anything better, let me know and I'll start using that instead of Ballistol.
 

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Well, according to you, I've desecrated my slings. My problem is all of my items are in my basement, in a small room. My dehumidifier runs constantly to stay ahead of the moisture. This time of the year in E. Tn, humidity starts really getting tough. It's a fine line between having mildew show up or drying stuff out to the point of taking all the moisture from leather and stocks. That's where the Ballistol comes in....helps in both areas. Some of the old slings and ammo pouches probably had guys pissing on 'em as far as I know, yet they are still around and yes, they have a light coat of Ballistol on them. If you know of anything better, let me know and I'll start using that instead of Ballistol.
You aren't "desecrating" them Duke. You are hastening their destruction and devaluation, which of course, takes time. Where I live is a helluva lot more humid than anywhere in Tn., all year long. I rely on a properly HVAC'd home and dehumidified safe. I also collect helmets (leather liners) and gear (leather). I would never wipe any of that with Ballistol, per every museum and conservator guideline ever published since it was realized about 30 years ago that neatsfootoil is ultimately destructive to leather.

In short, the best thing to do with vintage leather is to leave it be and store and display it properly. Next best after that, I use a light wipe of Pecards, not lathering it or globbing it. Mildew is going to happen if your sling is moist from anything and the storage area not properly dehumidified.

Bottom line (IMHO and experience) - Ballistol is good stuff and cheap and the closest thing to what was period used on German WW2 firearms. It cleans bores, corrosive salts, is a pretty decent metal preservative, is non-toxic, and the general/universal gunlube/bore cleaner/preservative I use. While no problem if it gets on stocks and leather, don't treat your stocks and leather with it per the sales pitches for the product.
 

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I've been using ballistol for a little while now. The only time I use it on leather is if the holster is dry and cracking. If the leather is ok with not much cracking, I just leave it be. It easily cleans bores and rust but does leave a very thin film on things. If you use it on a stock, I would suggest that you use it sparingly as it will attract dirt and grime if not properly stored. It is easier to clean my hands after using ballistol than with other solvents I've used and I've come to tolerate the smell.
 

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Ballistol dries pretty quickly on a stock unless sloshed on and left damp. Curious - what kind of environment is necessary for correct use of Ballistol to attract dirt/grime? I have been using this product for years without any evidence of such damage to stocks.

Scott
 
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