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I absolutely fell in love with these rifles when I saw them on here. Unfortunately I was a little late on the bandwagon, though I did find one at Buffalo Bros. I wanted to go to Allan's Armory but a gun shop salary kept me from spending that kind of money.

I got a 1929 46, the finish on the stock is quite thin in places, so a refinish will be in order. The sling swivels were held on with bent nails so somehow I need to find new screws. The last problem is that the gun is drilled and tapped, the front hole for the rear base is actually drilled on the step up in contour. I really don't know how else to say it but it just doesn't look right. So finding bases might be rough, when I do I found a nice Weaver K1.5 to go on top.

Of course the blue is well worn so I will have to do something about the metal finish, any suggestions?

Just had to tell somebody,
Nick
 

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evans;

Caliber I assume to be 9.3x57.

Sounds like there is a screw hole in the barrel?

You could always fill it with a headless screw and use "normal" bases on the receiver. That would solve the oddball base problem.

Or, peep sight it.

As of metal finish, without a picture hard to say, but maybe it's fine?

A reblue can be done whenever.

Glad you are on board. Fill us in with load work, etc.
 

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Replace the nails with a couple of 5x40 socket head screws and trim the heads to fit, they are easier to find than slotted screws unless you like em zinc plated.

You can use weaver aluminum bases #46 front, #55 rear and contour the base to fit the charger hump. Or, since the metal needs refinishing, you can have teh rear bridge contoured. I'd suggest rust bluing the barrel & action again to restore it.
 

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welding drill and tap fix

I would not recomend this unless you are skilled with metal fab however it is possible to weld in the holes, I had a an older lever action that expelled shells from the top and previous owner had left handed side mount scope on it I am right handed so needed right mount scope. a friend of mine who is a very good welder put it in freezer over night and next day while cold filled the screw holes in with a mig welder each dab with the mig to fill he cooled down with ice water and rubbed with oil after they were completely filled, and he filled in high for finishing, I filed down with a fine tooth very carefully and finished by hand with sand paper on a small section of wood, working my way down in grit til it was perfectly smooth, I rust blued the whole thing over using the old fashion bathtub method and unless you know the holes were there you can hardly tell unless you search for them. again unless you are a very skilled metal worker and welder I would not attempt this myself, but it worked for me just fine:)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses, I think I will just buy the bases and see if I cant work on them to make them fit. I would rather do that, than to do any welding on the receiver. I will try to find the screws today and put them in the sling swivels at work.

Other than these small items the gun is in good shootable condition with a beautiful bore, so I can't wait for the weekend.

Thanks
Nick
 

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Nick- if you can find a Leupold or Redfield single piece base, you only use the centred rear screw hole and the two at the front of the action. Measure the screw spacing to see if you can get close enough. Re-drilling a scope base has been done before.;)
 

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Nick- if you can find a Leupold or Redfield single piece base, you only use the centred rear screw hole and the two at the front of the action. Measure the screw spacing to see if you can get close enough. Re-drilling a scope base has been done before.;)
This is very good advice and will save a lot of mucking around drilling and tapping and filling screw holes.
 

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This is very good advice and will save a lot of mucking around drilling and tapping and filling screw holes.
Certainly worth exploring but I suppose I'm jaded. I've never come accross one of these that has been drilled & tapped for anything that remotely resembles a commercial hole pattern. But, there's always a first time.
 
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