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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those of you wishing to post photos for the heck of it, use this sticky.
RULES: TRY to keep them on subject but not a requirment, the OCCASIONAL aircraft/ship/off topic photo ok, but don't over do. No more than ONE(1) Elle MacPherson photo at a time.
Remember, this is a "FAMILY" site. Decency and Decorum required.
SAVE THE ONES YOU LIKE: After 30 to 45 days, photo will be deleted to save TUCOs memory space.
jona
 

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interesting....

that the soldiers shooting the long lee enfields prone are using a shooting sling. Itd be nice to know what year that practice started in 'our' armies.....
 

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Gawd, can you imagine the howls of protest from the naysayers!!
When my wife saw the pic I heard it from her. That, and many other reasons is why we no longer live together.

My oldest asked me about when I was getting her a .22 last night. I guess I got to start looking.
 

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Colt Machine Gun

Coop. The Colt MG pictured above, is that the one nicknamed the "Potato Masher"? The Lithgow SAF Museum has one also.
Darren.
In Canada, they called them the "Potato Digger." This particular model had a lever at the gas port below the muzzle, and when fired, the lever move downward about 90 degrees and pushed a rod back operating the mechanism.

If you got the muzzle too close to the ground, the lever hit the ground when fired, digging up dirt.
 

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.303 Slings

that the soldiers shooting the long lee enfields prone are using a shooting sling. Itd be nice to know what year that practice started in 'our' armies.....
The use of slings for the Lee Enfields is an early practice with target shooters. The sling was attached to the fore end swivel, and to a swivel located just in front of the magazine. This is one of the reasons that the early No1MkIIIs had an attachment point just ahead of the magazine on the floorplate/triggerguard. The rear sling swivel could be unscrewed, and then moved to this mid-rifle position. This attachment point was eliminated in the No1MkIII* in 1915.

The big "trick", learned from experience, was to attach the sling to the front swivel first. You then give the sling a 1/2 turn to the LEFT, putting a twist into the sling. Then attach it to the center swivel.

By putting this "twist" into the sling, the sling then positioned itself flat against the left arm providing a better and more comfortable hold, and not cutting into the arm.

You could then hold the rifle by the wrist with the right hand, rotate it to the left smartly, and the sling would swing to the right. You then immediately rotated the rifle to the right, the sling picked up a bit of momentum, and as it came left across in front of you, you stuck out your left arm into the loop of the sling. By lifting your left wrist vertical, moving it over the top of the sling and grasping the forestock, the sling was then in position for support.

All this sounds complicated, but could probably be learned how to do it in five minutes of practice.

Later target shooters had special sling swivels that were made to replace the front action screw. They were roughly triangular shaped, and rotated or swivelled on the end of the screw.
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Interesting picture of the Bren LMG mounted on the 25 pounder. This was for anti-tank practice, you will notice the gunner in the Number 3 position (gun layer) is looking through the telescopic sight, and you can see the attachment to the Bren Guns trigger. .303 is a lot cheaper than 25 pounder shells, and a heck of a lot easier on the equipment than firing Super Charge.
 

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Nice work

Thanks for the show.

..MJ...
 

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Sling attachment

In an earlier post BuffDog stated that there is a point for attaching a sling swivel just forward of the magazine, but was eliminated in 1915 with the adoption of the Mk.III*. I just wanted to report that I have a BSA. Co. Mk.III* dated 1918 that still has the attachment point. I don't know if it's just a case of reusing surplus parts but I found it intersting enough to check on my rifles.
 

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Nice Picture

Nice picture Wolftam. A Mk. III with volley sights intact I presume?
 

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Nice picture Wolftam. A Mk. III with volley sights intact I presume?
It is (again) now. Didn't have a MkIII but had all the bits (forearm, volley sights, early sight protector - all Enfield marked). Then a mate offers me his sported 1915 Enfield MkIII. What else could I do ?:)


 

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The book itself is based around the panoramic photos taken in WW1 by the Royal Engineers. Some fascinating photo's in it. These are a few of my personal favourites. Unfortunately the panorama's aren't done justice on this scale.
1 - Camouflaged truck and gun
2 - Railway camouflaged by the French
3 - Foldout panorama
4 - A comparison panorama, then and now
5 - part of a much larger photo but what struck me was the rifle forearm, first I've seen in a period photo.
 

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The handsome bugger on the right is yours truly.
This is the 500m run down

The Next Picture is a 1950 Long Branch CNo4Mk1* which belongs to the Queen but is in my possession in exchange for my services. Regimental Armourer free floated and centre bedded her some time ago. The PH5C does belong to me (and not her Majesty). At 500 metres I was out shooting the majority of C7A1's on the field.

Last Pic
It just feels right......
 
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