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Discussion Starter #1
Two of the most recent three rifles I've seen advertised as FN 1900 rifles appeared to be fakes, or at least misrepresented in part, in my opinion -- mix-masters of some Remington Model 8 parts, some authentic FN 1900 parts, and possibly some Model 8 parts altered to look like FN 1900 parts. One gun looked mostly correct but did not have an original FN 1900 stock set, sling swivels, or charging handle (though it was described as "all original, excellent condition"). The second one actually had its serial number scrubbed, and the receiver polished and re-blued where the serial number should have been. It was described as having "no visible serial number." In fact, it also had no Belgian proof marks at all, as far as I could see. The stock set was close in profile and overall shape to the FN 1900, but the checkering was wrong, done in none of the three known FN checkering patterns. Most importantly, it was chambered in .30 Rem and stamped "30" on the barrel, receiver, and bolt, but according to Woodall the FN 1900 was chambered exclusively in "calibre 9mm" (equivalent to .35 Remington). Watch out for these, and make up your own mind about them if you see them.
 

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The rare .30Remcaliber FN1900!

Are they putting a rib on the bbl jacket also?
I think I read that some of the 1900's were mfg w/o the rib or at least that was an option.
Probably too much work for most fakers to do.

If they do have the rib on the bbl,,the orig rear sight is a small dovetailed base with 2 leaf (one folding),,much like you find on Mauser sporters.


Not having a ser#,,reblued, wrong checkering pattern, wrong caliber, no Liege proofs....they didn't try very hard!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One had the rib, the other didn't, as I recall. The one with the rib had the correct rear sight -- and it at least had the Liege proofs too. As I said, it was mostly correct; the real problem was the stock set. The other one, however, was truly astonishing with respect to how much was wrong with it. The wrong caliber!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, so I sent my concerns to the auction house and the gun is still listed, no changes, so they either think I am wrong or else they simply do not care. I am interested in your opinions about this gun, as it is my OPINION that it is not what it being represented to be. It is Lot 0125 offered at the Oct 17, 2020 Fall Firearms Auction of Connecticut Firearms Auction in Berlin CT.

The first major problem with the gun is that there is no visible serial number. All FN 1900 rifles were clearly marked with their serial numbers, I believe. So, right off the bat, something is wrong and I don't see any way past this.

The second major problem is that it is stamped in multiple locations as being chambered in .30 Rem, a cartridge and caliber that the FN 1900 was never offered in, to my knowledge.

Third, while the receiver and the barrel jacket look mostly correct to my eye (though I see no Belgian proof marks anywhere), I think (but cannot say with certainty) that the buttstock and forearm checkering are in patterns never offered by FN according to TheGreatModel8.remingtonsociety.com. As they were hand-checkered, however, it might simply be a slight variation. Also, the "no cheeks" style of the front end of buttstock where it meets the sides of the receiver seems wrong to me.

So, what do you guys think? Real FN 1900 or fake later Model 8 modified to appear as an FN 1900, in your OPINION? EVEN IF it is an actual FN 1900 that was re-stocked and rechambered at some time during its lifetime, what could explain the absence of any serial numbers?
 

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As far as I can tell, lot 0125 looks almost exactly like the FN modele 1900 on page 25 of the Henwood's book, with the exception of the modification to the chambering.
 

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The '30' stamped into the bbl extension on the right side is just that,,'30'. Does it indicate 30Remington caliber?,,I don't know.
I think that '30' marking on the right side was punched in after the rifle left FN.
If it was a caliber marking and done by FN,,it would have been in M/M.
FN had no contract to sell the 1900 in North America, That was the deal.
So they would have no reason to mark the rifle in anything other than metric designation wether it was to stay in-factory at FN or was something that was to be for sale in Europe.

If you look at the pic of the muzzle and the bore,,does that bore size look like the .35/9mm dia of what the orig 1900Model production rifles were?,,same size as a 35Remington..and not that of a 30cal.
Pics can be deceiving of course.

Bolt is unmarked as to caliber,,IIRC the production FN's were marked 9m/m
A 9mmBrowning bolt head recess would be too large (as would a 35Rem bolt head) for the 30Remington case. Different extractor & different magazine as well.
Different recoil & buffer springs inside the bbl jacket as well, lighter compression weight for the 30Rem.


Then move to the two marks on the left side ,,one on the bbl extension,, the other immedietely beside it upon the frame itself.
On first glance these markings both appear to each be '30'. (30 (caliber) again?)

But if you enlarge the pic and look closely,,in each of the markings, the '3' is a clean stamping, but the '0' is an over stamp of a '7'.
My opinion is that what was originally in place in each position there was simply a '7' .
If so,,that could have easily have been an assembly# or ser#

I think the '3' and the '0' were added at some later time. For what reason ??

What I'm leaning towards is that the rifle is a very early FN1900 pre-production model. The '7' would most likely be an assembly #. No proofs as the rifle was never meant to leave the R&D of FN.


Stock looks European Walnut. Checkering is their flat top diamond style. I wouldn't rely on checkering patterns in books and catalogs as being the only ones ever offered or having been done on any specific model of most anything ever made. Lots of stuff is done in the factorys that is never cataloged or goes along with a book written a century later.

All this said, it certainly has enough off the tracks about it to want answers about before investing very much into it. The pics certainly don't provide much infor, only questions and more guesses as to why things are.
A hands on inspection would be nice, but even then I doubt that a whole lot more would be nailed down as a final answer.

Interesting rifle for sure and I wouldn't mind owning it.

Relying on auction house explanations and their 'exspur't knowledge of various subjects is a sure way to spend a lot of money and come up short.
They don't sell the stuff 'As Is,,Where Is' for no reason. They don't want it back no matter what.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All interesting theories. Interested in reading views of others, too. I'm not traveling to Berlin, Connecticut for an in-hand inspection, though. I'm looking for a decent solid example of an FN 1900 rifle, and signs of use and wear don't matter to me. But I don't need or want a snowflake.
 
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