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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

This is the first rifle I have ever bought. Other firearms I have are an Smith & Wesson M&P Shield EZ M2.0 9mm, M&P Bodyguard and I had a Hi-Point CF380. I just got an M91 Carcano Cavalry Carbine hand-select from Classic Firearms. There didn't seem to be any cosmoline on it so the metal had a bit of rust but after soaking it in Break-Free MIL-Spec CLP it helped clean it up a bit then I just cleaned the wood with a dry micro-fiber towel. It's not perfect but good overall.

Only issues is that one of the adjustable sight screws is stripped so it holds but is a bit wobbly, the bayonet is a bit wobbly, and I didn't want to take the chance in disassembling the trigger guard assembly to clean it.

I got a reproduction sling, ten en-bloc clips, and I ordered some back-ordered ammunition for it that should be here... eventually. So one day, I will be able to shoot her.

Any thoughts on the production date? It doesn't seem to have any other markings related to the date near the serial number so maybe it's a mid-war model?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The metal looks to be nice. I picked up one from classic that had bad metal and was hand selected for "nice stock" according to the little tag that came with. A non-matching refurb stock at that :p
There is a small rust spot under the hand guard and another one somewhere else under the stock. I removed what I could but I didn't go deep into it. There's also a hairline crack on the stock but I don't think it should cause issues.

It was my first time purchasing from Classic Firearms so I just took the chance with hand select. I likely got lucky.

Still, I just can't wait for the ammo to come in and hopefully not blow up in my face when shoot it...
 

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There is a small rust spot under the hand guard and another one somewhere else under the stock. I removed what I could but I didn't go deep into it. There's also a hairline crack on the stock but I don't think it should cause issues.

It was my first time purchasing from Classic Firearms so I just took the chance with hand select. I likely got lucky.

Still, I just can't wait for the ammo to come in and hopefully not blow up in my face when shoot it...
All of the Mother-Goose tales you hear about Carcano rifles are simply fairy-tales. Consider the source.
Why in the world would it blow up when you shoot it? If you have a concern about your Moschetto because you see a flaw in the barrel best take some photos and post them so the experts on this forum can advise.
Wear safety glasses and NOT the cheap plastic $2.99 Harbor Freight specials.
Best to buy some Ballistol and wipe it down gently, don't go mother-hen on your Moschetto and over knit-pick it .



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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All of the Mother-Goose tales you hear about Carcano rifles are simply fairy-tales. Consider the source.
Why in the world would it blow up when you shoot it? If you have a concern about your Moschetto because you see a flaw in the barrel best take some photos and post them so the experts on this forum can advise.
Wear safety glasses and the cheap plastic $2.99 Harbor Freight specials.
Best to buy some Ballistol and wipe it down gently, don't go mother-hen on your Moschetto and over nit-pick it .



View attachment 3959580
I say blow up in my face as in I don't know what will happen when I shoot it. The barrel seems fine. Pictures later. I'm still excited for the day when I shoot it.
 

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I say blow up in my face as in I don't know what will happen when I shoot it. The barrel seems fine. Pictures later. I'm still excited for the day when I shoot it.
First time shooter with the Carcano and a little apprehensive.... you would feel better if you were with an experienced buddy at the range. Here's a video from Youtube... The Koba49, listen to what he has to say, he has done a lot of work with the Carcano rifles... He'll be your Go-To guide...
Enjoy your Moschetto 91/38, your '44 FNA-Brescia is the best of the best!

 

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There is a small rust spot under the hand guard and another one somewhere else under the stock. I removed what I could but I didn't go deep into it. There's also a hairline crack on the stock but I don't think it should cause issues.

It was my first time purchasing from Classic Firearms so I just took the chance with hand select. I likely got lucky.

Still, I just can't wait for the ammo to come in and hopefully not blow up in my face when shoot it...
Avoid the oversized Hornady bullets and you won’t have any problems. The Carcano is a very strong rifle. There’s a video online of a couple guys trying to blow one up and they had to plug the bore to explode the receiver.
 

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Welcome! I purchased my first “Carcano M91 cavalry carbine” from Classic when they got them in a couple years ago. The actual name for the rifle is a Moschetto Modello 1891. I purchased PPU ammo and had fun shooting it. The battle sights are set up for 300/600 yds if I remember correctly. You want to flip it forward for the lower 300 yd setting.

You’ll have fun with it. There’s also a good chance you’ll start reading about other old military guns on here and get addicted.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Avoid the oversized Hornady bullets and you won’t have any problems. The Carcano is a very strong rifle. There’s a video online of a couple guys trying to blow one up and they had to plug the bore to explode the receiver.
I ordered the back-ordered Steinel round nose ammo. Should be here one day...

If the nosecap and action screws are not stuffed and easy to remove, separating the stock isn't a major undertaking.
I disassembled and soaked in CLP just about everything I could except the trigger guard (and the wood).
 

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Rear Sights Ranges: When the whole rear sight leaf is flipped forward the front of the rifle resting in the notch in the handguard, that notch is calibrated for 300 meters, this the normal way to keep the rear sight leaf during storage or carrying, this sight notch is known as the 'battle sight'. If you flip the rear sight leaf toward the rear of the rifle and resting on the 300 meter notch that notch is calibrated for 450 meters.

Here is the original ballistic trajectory chart for the Moschetto Modello 1891 using the ordinary ball type bullets 'Cartoucche a Pallotolla Mo.1891-1895' (FMJ, 163 grain, round nose, flat-based bullet), the muzzle velocity from the Moschetto Modello 1891 is 661 MPS (2168 FPS).

Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Rear Sights Ranges: When the whole rear sight leaf is flipped forward the front of the rifle resting in the notch in the handguard, that notch is calibrated for 300 meters, this the normal way to keep the rear sight leaf during storage or carrying, this sight notch is known as the 'battle sight'. If you flip the rear sight leaf toward the rear of the rifle and resting on the 300 meter notch that notch is calibrated for 450 meters.

Here is the original ballistic trajectory chart for the Moschetto Modello 1891 using the ordinary ball type bullets 'Cartoucche a Pallotolla Mo.1891-1895' (FMJ, 163 grain, round nose, flat-based bullet), the muzzle velocity from the Moschetto Modello 1891 is 661 MPS (2168 FPS).

Patrick
Good to know. I knew it was calibrated for 300 meters when set forward, I just didn't know this was how it was supposed to be stored too. Most of the videos I have seen the sight set for 450 meters instead when not in use.

I figured it was weird to have to deploy the battle sight first prior to shooting and that when set for 450 meters the sight stays locked in place for storage.
 

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Keep in Mind too, that the official Italian Army Line of Sight is to place "a line from the bottom of the Rear Sight Notch, to the Summit of the Front Sight"; highlighted below.
Font Paper Publication Paper product Document

But this of course is based on the original 162gr. Ammo.
Also, for shooting at Short Range (100 & 200 meters) on Combat Silhouette Targets, the Italians used lower power Ammo & "False Aiming Points" below the Bullseye; much like the targets used to Zero ARs with Scopes @ 10 or 25 yards etc.
But then again, all this might go out the window using commercially loaded Ammo; so find how/where yours shoots with the it; until you can reload your own to Military Trajectory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Keep in Mind too, that the official Italian Army Line of Sight is to place "a line from the bottom of the Rear Sight Notch, to the Summit of the Front Sight"; highlighted below.
View attachment 3959722
But this of course is based on the original 162gr. Ammo.
Also, for shooting at Short Range (100 & 200 meters) on Combat Silhouette Targets, the Italians used lower power Ammo & "False Aiming Points" below the Bullseye; much like the targets used to Zero ARs with Scopes @ 10 or 25 yards etc.
But then again, all this might go out the window using commercially loaded Ammo; so find how/where yours shoots with the it; until you can reload your own to Military Trajectory.
"Adjust as needed" would be my approach.

That was something I was wondering too, whether or not to keep the spent casings when after I go to the range.
 

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Here are some pictures of the bolt, bolt face (pardon if my terminology is wrong), and inside the barrel (to the best of my ability). Prior to cleaning the bolt face was pretty dirty.

View attachment 3959896 View attachment 3959897 View attachment 3959898 View attachment 3959899
The bolt face and the locking lug look good, almost like new, but the rifling at the muzzle end looks fouled. Could be heavy Cu-Ni metal accumulation. I have a '37 Gardone VT moschetto 91 with a gain twist barrel that was heavily fouled with Cu-Ni at the muzzle end. The Cu-Ni build-up looks almost like worn steel. The rifling and crown on it looked shot, like yours, but after removing all the build-up it looks great now. Have you cleaned the bore with a Gunzilla or Copperzilla?... if that's metal fouling it's going to take awhile to get it all out. You will see a gray metal deposit on your cleaning patch... don't freak-out this isn't steel coming from the barrel ... Forget Hoppes 9... it's worthless for metal fouling and stay away from abrasive liquid cleaners like the Remington product.
 
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